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China's 'space' walk filmed under water?

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posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 03:43 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


You may be right about the speed of the movements. But I have watched this video many times now, and around 1:05, it really DOES look like an air bubble. It behaves just like an air bubble in water. This is certainly very strange.


[edit on 1-10-2008 by ziggystar60]




posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 03:46 PM
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reply to post by GodForbid
 


Do we know what they are? When first opening the hatch a bunch of junk was blown out at around 8:15 on the full video of the module so perhaps some just got caught on the suit and broke free later when moving.



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 03:52 PM
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At 1:56 there appears to be another 'bubble' which seems to change shape like an air bubble in water does. Or is that my imagination playing tricks on me?



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 03:54 PM
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Originally posted by EnlightenUp
reply to post by GodForbid
 


Do we know what they are? When first opening the hatch a bunch of junk was blown out at around 8:15 on the full video of the module so perhaps some just got caught on the suit and broke free later when moving.


If something just broke free, I would imagine it to break off quite slowly, unless there were some really fast motions made by the astronaut, which there aren't. The bubble seems to bend around the guy's helmet, and travel upwards very quickly. To travel that fast it would have had to have broken free in a very violent way.



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 03:59 PM
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Those do not look like underwater movements to me, and the "bubbles" do not look like bubbles either.

One thing I noticed is that the camera moves too much, as the solar panel, it looks like the whole ship is under some stress.

And I think that this is in the wrong forum, this has nothing to do with Aliens & UFOs.



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 04:00 PM
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reply to post by GodForbid
 


My problem is that if it were bubbles, they would all assume the same trajectory opposite gravity almost from whence they originate, which they don't; they fly in all directions.

Perhaps some slight static charge is involved with the helmet.

Giving a light piece of material alot of velocity in a vacuum wouldn't take much if the material had a somewhat elastic collision with a massive object (astronaut).

Edit: Water does not explain what happens when opening the hatch since it is essentially incompressible.

[edit on 10/1/2008 by EnlightenUp]



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 04:02 PM
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Originally posted by ArMaP
Those do not look like underwater movements to me, and the "bubbles" do not look like bubbles either.

One thing I noticed is that the camera moves too much, as the solar panel, it looks like the whole ship is under some stress.

And I think that this is in the wrong forum, this has nothing to do with Aliens & UFOs.


I did edit into the OP that I accidentally posted it here. Sorry for that.

I understand they don't look like natural underwater movements to you, but with the aid of a buoyant suit I don't see why not.

Why is it that those bubbles don't look like bubbles to you? They seem to bend around the guys helmet, from the bottom of the screen upwards, and others seem to be changing shape, just like air bubbles do.

I'm not saying I know what they are, but if you do, I would like to know



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 04:05 PM
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Originally posted by EnlightenUp
reply to post by GodForbid
 


My problem is that if it were bubbles, they would all assume the same trajectory opposite gravity almost from whence they originate, which they don't; they fly in all directions.

Perhaps some slight static charge is involved with the helmet.

Giving a light piece of material alot of velocity in a vacuum wouldn't take much if the material had a somewhat elastic collision with a massive object (astronaut).


I addressed that earlier, I haven't seen one that doesn't go upwards yet. I've seen upwards at a slight angle, when they're filming the astronauts at a different angle, but I haven't seen any moving sideways, or downwards yet. Please point it out, sorry if I missed it.

The object moves around the astronauts helmet, or atleast appears to. I'd have thought in space it would bounce off of the helmet, collide if you will, instead of being 'streamed' past the helmet.



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 04:08 PM
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Originally posted by GodForbid


I totally understand what you're saying. You're right. But I'm not sure it's too many excuses. What's yours for this question: Why and how, would an ice particle come out from somewhere under his helmet, and move very quickly upwards out of the screen? Surely in a vacuum, something would have had to give that ice all for that energy to move so fast. I don't see anything flinging anything.

Granted, I'm not willing to label the Chinese space walk a fake, yet, but I definitely think this is worth discussion.


Possible explanation:

Current space suits remove the heat energy generated therein by sublimation. Sublimation occurs when a solid vaporizes without the intermediate formation of a liquid. Water from a separate storage tank is sublimated by exposing it to the vacuum of space. The water is exposed to the vacuum by means of a porous plate which forms part of a heat exchanger. The porous plate traps and freezes the water. The cooling medium, meanwhile, circulates through separate passages within the heat exchanger. The heat energy of the cooling medium sublimates the thin layer of ice producing a small cloud of water vapor. The heating load absorbed by the cooling medium is effectively rejected from the suit thereby. The resulting water vapor is vented to the environment.

Source

A piece of ice separates from the heat exchanger plate and begins to sublimate, creating it's own little jet of water vapor. I'll admit that the thing seems to originate near the base of the helmet which would be an odd placement for the heat exchanger but you know those wacky Chinese. Note I said "seems to originate". Can't really tell from the video where it actually did start from, it sort of comes around the visor. A piece of ice could have also formed on the suit when the capsule was depressurized.

You did get me to look very closely at the video this time. The thingy is intriguing but I just see too many other details that indicate a freefall environment rather than a water tank.



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 04:13 PM
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Originally posted by GodForbid
I addressed that earlier, I haven't seen one that doesn't go upwards yet. I've seen upwards at a slight angle, when they're filming the astronauts at a different angle, but I haven't seen any moving sideways, or downwards yet. Please point it out, sorry if I missed it.


At around 1:58 and 2:04, within a few seconds, two things move off at very different angles. The first, almost due north in the frame, the 2nd northwest.



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 04:16 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


An excellent reply, thank you
That may well explain it. It's still odd, but I had no idea this existed and it certainly gives a valid suggestion.

Star



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 04:23 PM
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reply to post by GodForbid
 


Thanks. But it is a bit more speculative than I would like. I really don't know that ice would behave that way. I have a feeling there has to be another explanation for the movement. Perhaps an orbital correction of the capsule.



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 04:25 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by GodForbid
 


Thanks. But it is a bit more speculative than I would like. I really don't know that ice would behave that way. I have a feeling there has to be another explanation for the movement. Perhaps an orbital correction of the capsule.


Doing orbital corrections while someone is hanging on for dear life?


Well, it is China so you never know.



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 04:28 PM
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reply to post by EnlightenUp
 


Actually, notice what the guy does at the 1:05 mark. He grabs on with both hands and seems to brace himself. After the thing moves off into space, he starts moving again. I can imagine the banter: "You're going to what? The hell you say! Whoa! OK, just wait till I get back inside. You're going to regret you did that!"



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 04:30 PM
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While I don't know if there is some conspiracy here, to discuss the matter as the OP suggested I did come up with one question. Could it be some liquid other than water? If the video is filmed in a liquid, it appears to be very pure or clean. Perhaps the resistance, friction or movement factors could be due to it being a liquid of a different density or of different properties than water.

Just a thought.



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 04:31 PM
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The change in the "bubbles" looks more like a change in position than a change in shape.

Also, if this was a bubble it should look the same (a bubble is a sphere) regardless of position on screen, the "bubbles" in the video have big changes in shape (or position), too big for bubbles.

The following images were resized to 200%, you have to click on them to see the full size image.

This is the first bubble.





The second bubble.





[edit on 1/10/2008 by ArMaP]



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 04:37 PM
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Great pics, cheers. I found it too hard to screen shot them when I tried.


It's still inconclusive, although you do have a very good point. The youtube video isn't the best quality to analyse small fast moving objects like these though.

We've got some good stuff out of this though, and I guess this is what ATS is for, trying to get to the truth
Good job.



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 04:39 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


Thanks, ArMaP, excellent work. (As always!) I agree the "things" don't look like air bubbles (spheres) in the stills you posted.
Sigh... Yet another cool conspiracy theory debunked... You are just too good.



[edit on 1-10-2008 by ziggystar60]



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 04:48 PM
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Originally posted by GodForbid


Now if they are bubbles, what could be causing them? I'm opposed to the idea of it being condensation off of the space suit. Some of those look like big bubbles. It also looks like air bubbles, or possibly, liquid bubbles in space. Liquid in space seems unlikely to me, I thought it would freeze?


Condensation from respiration, perspiration, and water being drawn from the skin in a dry air conditioned environment has to go somewhere. Think of when you breath on a window... you can see the moisture from you lungs and mouth on the glass, but then it evaporates into the air around it. On the Chinese suits, the vapor may collect on condensation plates that are cooled so they attract water vapor, until the water reaches a certain volume and is expelled from the space suit. Perhaps they even have a setting on the suits that does not expel the water during long missions so that it can be recycled instead of being expelled. This was what, a 3 day mission? Does that length of time warren the recycling of such a small amount of fluid, is is it easier to just expel it from the suit?

It would not remain a liquid but would freeze upon contact with the outside environment. As it is expelled with certain force, it wouldn't form a perfect sphere, but something more elongated that might give you the impression that it is moving like a bubble. Also they are essentially ejected with a certain amount of force away from the suits so they would be moving at a faster speed relative to the astronaut meaning they would not "float" along with him. They also both go in different directions, something that you would not expect water bubbles to do.

Or, you seem to think this is a better explanation... They could be doing this in a giant water tank, supplemented with real time CGI effects to.. you know, trick the world into believing that the Chinese actually made working space suits! I just don't understand what I'm seeing so it must be a trick!

This is just the first Chinese space walk anyway. They've had people in orbit before. They first went up in 1985...

I've been trying to get information on the Chinese space suits, but it's proving very difficult. I imagine they are classified anyway.



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 04:58 PM
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Found another YouTube video called "About paper and bubbles of ShenzhouVII". The music is obviously made somewhere in hell, so I recommend turning the sound off.





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