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Flying Manta Ray Filmed at 20,000 ft. From Airplane Window

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posted on Sep, 30 2008 @ 11:58 PM
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reply to post by schrodingers dog
 


I am withholding my "debunked" card for some solid evidence...

Maybe an expert will chime in........




posted on Sep, 30 2008 @ 11:59 PM
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I find it interesting that one the left of the youtube page that one the side there is videos of the mobula manta ray, a 'flying manta' similar to what the great whites do in south Africa. Jumping out of the water and seeming to fly. The plane or whatever it is seems to be flying over water. So maybe it was just one of those mobula (or whatever) manta rays. The pics at the end seem completely photoshoped though.



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 12:01 AM
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reply to post by mateandbucky06
 


I dont know why the poster of the video didnt just put the enhanced version of the film up and thats it....

Unfortunately we have to sit through some BS to get to the juicy stuff....



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 12:03 AM
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Fish falling from the sky is not completely unheard of:

The Weather Doctor
Answer: While fish and frogs falling from the sky is not a common occurrence, it has been reported many times around the world, with or without exaggerated embellishment.
Here is how it can happen:
The most likely means by which fish, frogs or any other object (books, a box of chickens, cows, letters have also been reported "falling" from the sky) are lifted aloft is through the passage of a tornado or waterspout. The strong updrafts can lift objects to great heights within a thunderstorm cloud and carried long distances.
When a tornado passes over the ground, it may sweep objects into its circulation and then throw them out again, kind of like a discus thrower. If the item is lightweight like a fish or a small frog, it may be caught in the strong storm/cloud updrafts for a long time, rising higher and higher until it is finally thrown out or drops out like a hailstone. (There is a report of an ice-covered turtle falling from a storm cloud!)
If the item is very heavy, it may not go very far ,and just tumble and jump along the ground, travelling some distance before coming to rest. Observers may think they saw it fall from the sky although it likely did not reach a high altitude.
High winds such as found in a hurricane may keep objects aloft for many miles, allowing them to fall far from their point of origin. Roofs, billboards, and other large, flat object can act as a sail or wing and be tossed high in the air. Even if an item is heavy, strong winds may roll and tumble it until it is hundreds of feet from its original location as has been reported for cars, trucks, and boats.

Considering the aerodynamic shape of manta rays, even though they are heavier, this is still a possibility. I do hope its not he case though, being a diver I love mantas, and if that is real footage we are probably seeing the last few minutes of its life.

[edit on 10/1/2008 by defcon5]



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 12:06 AM
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Originally posted by mateandbucky06
I find it interesting that one the left of the youtube page that one the side there is videos of the mobula manta ray, a 'flying manta' similar to what the great whites do in south Africa. Jumping out of the water and seeming to fly.


Mantas Breach like other marine life, and can appear to fly over the water for short distances. Its not really flying though so much as it is jumping.



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 12:07 AM
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Maybe it's looking for another Australian zoo keeper.

Too soon?

No, defcon5's explanation seems as good as any.



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 12:11 AM
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It might be one of these:

Ruppell's griffon


They can travel fast at need, cruising at up to 35 km/h, and will fly as far as 150 km from a nest site to find food. They can reach great heights, 6,000 m (20,000 ft) is not uncommon, and on one exceptional occasion, an aircraft over the Côte d'Ivoire collided with a Rüppell's Vulture at the astonishing altitude of 11,300 m (37,000 ft), the current record avian height.[1] They have a specialized variant of the hemoglobin alphaD subunit; this protein has a high affinity for oxygen, which allows the species to take up oxygen efficiently despite the low partial pressure in the upper troposphere.[2]

wikipedia

Plus there are many species of birds that use high altitude when they migrate.
source




[edit on 10/1/2008 by schrodingers dog]



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 01:30 AM
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reply to post by schrodingers dog
 


I like your sleuthing skills


However the creature/craft/hoax in question looks more soild




This would definitely look like a bird from an airplane....



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 01:39 AM
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It's clearly a plane flying low over very clear water. Sea Plane?



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 01:54 AM
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reply to post by IMAdamnALIEN
 


Manta rays only 'work' in water. They can leap for a few metres above the surface, but can't fly. There are a few reasons for that:

1. They have gills that don't function in air, meaning any ray that could fly would asphyxiate shortly after take-off
2. They don't have bones, but cartilage (like sharks, and like your nose and ears), meaning their wings would lack the strength to support their bulky, hydrodynamic (not aerodynamic) shape
3. Their cartilage skeleton requires the fish be surrounded by water to stop the organs deforming the skeleton, and eventually rupturing or pulling apart from each other (as the water supports the fish's massive weight). You can see that happen with caught sharks - when suspended by the tail you'll see that their necks seem awfully large - that is their skeleton deforming due to the extra weight

So no, it's not a manta ray. Or any other kind of ray. It might be something, but then a shaky video on YouTube isn't going to get any scientists interested in anything, as they are just too easy to fake. It sure is entertaining, though!



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 01:59 AM
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Originally posted by Lebowski achiever
It's clearly a plane flying low over very clear water. Sea Plane?

The wing looks to big for a private aircraft to me.
Seaplanes are almost universally overwing aircraft. I cannot think of ever seeing a floatplane with a lower wing.



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 02:15 AM
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Originally posted by schrodingers dog
Maybe it's looking for another Australian zoo keeper.

Too soon?

No, defcon5's explanation seems as good as any.




Sorry, I know this is in poor taste but it has been one of those days and this is the first thing to make me laugh out loud.

Whatever it really is, the video is kinda cool. I think it is better than the bigfoot scam since it is intriguing, probably easily explained, and no one is trying to profit from it. I will jsut label it a cool vid in my book and that is about it. Whatever knd of bird it turns out to be may not be as fun as imagining a sea creature soaring 20,000 feet in the air.



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 02:25 AM
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Okay, the footage form the airplane window was interesting but towards the end I thought it was some kind of a joke.



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 05:13 AM
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reply to post by defcon5
 


I can still see that the Manta is swimming in Water. No doubt. The plane is flying very low.



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 05:30 AM
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the last two photos are shopped.. im surprised that no one said anything about that..
they are from billy meijer or how ever you spell it.. tho they are, the same photo just
with different colour adjustments.



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 06:03 AM
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I don't know if planes can really flap their wings, but here's one of the Billy Meier pictures that they used in the video:

Billy Meier Picture

Compare that with the picture 48 seconds into the video

(I'd upload them here, but we're blocked from all photo sharing sites at work)



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 07:34 AM
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reply to post by dave420
 


First, as noted by others, mantas can breech. They could not, however, gain enough lift to sustain even a glide, let alone flight. Even "flying fish" with their lightweight structure and wing-like fins can only maintain short distances -- say 200 yards at best -- and at that it is a glide, not a flapping "flight".

Having seen a manta on two occasions moving through the water, their motion is very much as that shown in the video, except slower, much slower. Looking at the video, I am going to guess that it is an underwater video of a manta, speeded up, with an airplane wing superimposed over it for effect.



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 09:37 AM
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Well I think it's fake, and I'll tell you why.

If you look near the edge of the ray's wing closest to the plane you'll see what appears to be an artifact, like a black area that shouldn't be there. This happens often when photoshopping, you'll cut an area around an object and if you add tolerance or feather you'll get this blurry area. It's not a big deal and can easily be erased. Instead of erasing it the video's maker seems to have decided to add this cool looking little black crop out frame thing that moves around when it's most convienent to block out where you'd get a good view of the black area.

Some decent views are at:
:17
:27
:34

ect.

I could always be wrong, but that's just what it looks like to me.



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 10:44 AM
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The manta ray also looks translucent to transparent at times also.
The plane in the film would be traveling at no less than about 100mph to sustain flight above it's Wing In Ground effect




Wing In Ground effect, which refers to the reduction in drag experienced by an aircraft as it approaches a height approximately equal to the aircraft's wingspan above ground or other level surface, such as the sea. The effect increases as the wing descends closer to the ground, with the most significant effects occurring at an altitude of one half the wingspan


That increases lift by 40% so I'm not sure on exact math but the plane would still have to be going 60mph?

Manta Rays can weight upwards of 5000lbs but its hard to see how big this one actually is but given its slow flapping of it's wings,have to be going at least 60mph if in water and ~100mph if "flying" I'd say this is pretty obvious, not to mention how thin the air would be at 20,000ft requiring bigger wings.



posted on Oct, 1 2008 @ 11:44 AM
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Originally posted by caballero
that thing is flying as fast as the plane, I dont know how fast the plane is going there but if its a big jet its going 300+ mph, is it possible for something small like that to fly that fast?


If it's in 1948, it's not a big jet. Most likely it's a propellor driven craft...moving along at 150-200mph. Still remarkable and, at least to me, unexplainable.



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