It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Does 485 Point Rebound Mean Much?

page: 1
1
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Sep, 30 2008 @ 03:11 PM
link   
The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

As of now the market is back up 484.xx from yesterday's close. From all the crying on CNN last night, this wasn't what was expected. They had one lady on, (I wouldn't want to meet her in a dark alley with the attitude she had), who was spinning this as the end of life as we know it.

So what are investors telling us? Buying cheap because they expect a rise? Figuring money is worthless and they might as well? Thumbing their noses at the "Big Boys"? Whistling in the dark as they try to find a way out of this graveyard?

Just curious why this is going in such an unexpected direction.




As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.




posted on Sep, 30 2008 @ 03:12 PM
link   
reply to post by NGC2736
 


It means this roller-coaster ride is not over. Not over, by a long shot! (My cliche-line of the day.)



posted on Sep, 30 2008 @ 03:18 PM
link   

Originally posted by NGC2736
Just curious why this is going in such an unexpected direction.



doubt it was unexpected. People i saw on tv this morning, expected some sort of rebound today.

Who knows what it means, i doubt very much.



posted on Sep, 30 2008 @ 03:22 PM
link   
It wasnt on high volume which leads me to believe head fake. Im sure some people went in today and did some bargain hunting but I wouldnt be to quick to jump for joy. However if this bailout DOES go through then Im sure youll see the market jump 700 + points.



posted on Sep, 30 2008 @ 03:23 PM
link   

Originally posted by pluckynoonez
reply to post by NGC2736
 


It means this roller-coaster ride is not over. Not over, by a long shot! (My cliche-line of the day.)


This is what panic sex is nice. People like me get to take advantage of the sex while there is a panic and then when things calm down I will have gotten mine
BTW this is in regards to a comment yesterday.
I know youll be eyeing this one forum moderators.

[edit on 30-9-2008 by mybigunit]



posted on Sep, 30 2008 @ 03:24 PM
link   
reply to post by NGC2736
 

The people who sold their stock yesterday must have decided to buy it back today. Yesterday gas and oil fell. Today the markets were flooded with 630 billion in freshly printed dollars ,but the Euro fell. The Europeans must have also been running their printing presses like mad . This whole thing is becoming surreal.




[edit on 30-9-2008 by eradown]



posted on Sep, 30 2008 @ 03:24 PM
link   
The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

I would have thought this rally, if it can be called that, would have taken a bit longer to unfold. Maybe if the US had taken a page from the Chinese and started jailing the top crooks I would have seen the logic. But GB spouting his crap doesn't faze many people, IMO.

Or is there a factor that's not so obvious?




As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Sep, 30 2008 @ 03:30 PM
link   

Originally posted by NGC2736
Just curious why this is going in such an unexpected direction.


Well, I know this might sound a bit weird, but is it possible that despite themselves, the downvoting of the bill was seen as positive by the savvy investors who otherwise invested wisely and are not in trouble? After all, they have reports as high as 95% of the public who stand with them to NOT bailout the thieves.



posted on Sep, 30 2008 @ 03:43 PM
link   
reply to post by TrueAmerican
 


Good point.

I hope people don't buckle overtime. Hitler said something that I hope doesn't occur. He said:

"People are generally stupid, if you repeat the same slogans again and again they will eventually believe it."

If you keep saying crisis, the sky is falling, the great depression and now rescue package instead of bailout package people will start to change their minds.

I'm not comparing anyone to Hitler but people in power use the same propaganda techniques of Goebbels.



posted on Sep, 30 2008 @ 03:51 PM
link   
Like the Himalyas, there are lots of lesser peaks on the way down.

For instance, the '29 crash:




Lots of jagged, ineffectual rallies while on the rollercoaster to the bottom.

And don't forget the massive, unreported market interventions that are going on to push up stock prices. Markets don't sink like the Titanic; they sputter and rally but trend inexorably downward.



posted on Sep, 30 2008 @ 03:55 PM
link   
reply to post by gottago
 


The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

Maybe it's because everything moves faster, but in that graph there is a pretty long downslope before any major rally shows up. I'm just curious why this turned so fast. It's almost like a planned gamble that when it didn't work, everyone bailed on the idea.




As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Sep, 30 2008 @ 04:01 PM
link   
reply to post by NGC2736
 


You didn't have the vast scale of the market in '29 as you have today; so volatility was much stronger, and you also didn't have the unseen hand of gov't and huge institutional investors acting to stabilize markets.

I'm highly suspect of any market falling nearly 800 points one day, only to rebound by over half that the next. This to me screams secret market intervention. You can be sure the FED and the other central banks are moving massive amounts of credit to support stocks and keep these market runs at bay. None of it is (relatively) new. But it was unheard of in '29, and that's why you had the steep plummet. Today we have market life-support--but it's still in the trauma unit.



posted on Sep, 30 2008 @ 04:39 PM
link   

Originally posted by gottago
reply to post by NGC2736
 


You didn't have the vast scale of the market in '29 as you have today; so volatility was much stronger, and you also didn't have the unseen hand of gov't and huge institutional investors acting to stabilize markets.

I'm highly suspect of any market falling nearly 800 points one day, only to rebound by over half that the next. This to me screams secret market intervention. You can be sure the FED and the other central banks are moving massive amounts of credit to support stocks and keep these market runs at bay. None of it is (relatively) new. But it was unheard of in '29, and that's why you had the steep plummet. Today we have market life-support--but it's still in the trauma unit.


I agree.
I feel the bailout/"buy in" debacle is merely a ruse to artificially fluctuate the market so those who have the ability to do so can extract more money from it before the market goes belly up along with the country. Lots of swings over the past week. Those who have been profiteering from this are the ones to be held accountable. The banking stocks today were among the strongest performers. Obviously. This entire scenario has been orchestrated to become the administrations OPUS. Of course, all on the backs of the already spent people.



posted on Sep, 30 2008 @ 04:45 PM
link   
I am now convinced that all we see in the main stream media, particularly the business programming, is like a gigantic twenty-four hour carnival broker enticing us into the tent where we get mugged.

Yesterday, it was, "How could Congress do this, this is the end of the stock market as we know it."

Today, it was, "Clearly the market rallies in anticipation of the bill being resubmitted and passing soon."

Shameless.



posted on Sep, 30 2008 @ 04:45 PM
link   
Like I said, shameless.


[edit on 30-9-2008 by Grumble]



posted on Sep, 30 2008 @ 05:17 PM
link   
The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

I personally get the feeling of rats leaving a sinking ship. They tried the con, hoping for the bailout money, and since it didn't float, they now need to gain back their earnest money. It reminds me of the "Found Money Con", and America's taxpayers were the marks. (The one where someone claims to have found money on the street, and wants to split it with you. Only you have to put up a bunch of your own cash to see it through.)

It seems that everybody and his dog knew this was coming, and let it happen, betting that the current administration would get the money out of Congress. When Congress lost it's nerve for the con, then the players scrambled to regain their portion of the pie they had put on the table.

Nope, I'm no big headed genius at finances, but I have seen con games run, and this has so many things in common with one it's not even funny.

Or maybe I've lost all my trust in things happening by chance.




As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Sep, 30 2008 @ 05:58 PM
link   
reply to post by NGC2736
 


Stock markets don't just .. drop to the bottom (not any more anyways.. not like 1929 where a few men could case a massive economic explosion)

778 points down is a huge drop (1.2 trillion dollars actually), but only a 7% decline.

448 points UP means a small rebound, mostly people grabbing up cheap shares in the hopes the bill passes (which I am certain it will)... Not many people where selling because they are awaiting news on what's going to happen .. another failure and I agree with some economist, it could be catastrophic.

But as I said, markets don't just drop..

They go like this:

-200
+60
+10
+70
-100
-40
+120
+30
+17
-240
-40
-10
+50
-10
+80
+70
-400
+180


In the end, it's still a decrease (over time) .. when you see such a hypothetical display of numbers on a graph over a month you see a line dipping, rising, dipping, rising, often each dip lower then the previous (waves)

When ever you have a massive sell off, the next day is almost always a positive day.. people are buying stocks at discount, people put calls on stocks betting they rise, people hold off selling until stock numbers rebound and they can recoup value..

If your portfolio drops 78% in one day .. your not going to sell the next day for a huge loss.. you will ride it out, no selling, put some calls maybe, maybe even add liquid funds to purchase more of the stock.

Even after the 1929 crash, the following days where rallies..

Stocks will level out for the week, a few minor dips and raises, awaiting the House decision.



posted on Sep, 30 2008 @ 06:14 PM
link   
reply to post by Rockpuck
 


The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

I can see your point there. But then why the screaming urgency expressed by everyone from the President on down? Why try to ram this home like a football player straining to get the ball over the line? It's the tone of the players all but demanding the money that sounds so fishy.

And if all of this "correction" is going to come out of the taxpayers pocket anyway, then why the need to funnel it back through the same people that screwed the pooch the first go around? Why not just insure the 401s and the pension funds and let the market find it's new level?

These are the type of questions that make so many people feel like this is a robbery in progress.




As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Sep, 30 2008 @ 06:20 PM
link   
It's all the rhetoric. Bailout fails, stocks plummet. Talks of a reworking, stocks rise, but not as high as they were. The above was very true. We have quicker spikes now due to this governmental rescue BS. The markets are also more global. Europe's markets are falling right now, so investors are pulling out and plugging in here because we are still talking about this 700b BS. It will have its ups and downs all the way down.



posted on Sep, 30 2008 @ 06:22 PM
link   
rockpuck pretty much covered it.

what you had today was some people enjoying the discounted prices of many stocks.

look at it like this.

microsoft was down a few bucks on Monday. Microsoft is a cash rich company that, in reality, shouldn't go down as a result of the banking issues. So, it's cheap, snatch it up. Lots of people were doing this with companies across the board. So they went up in price.

question is, with the profits many people saw today, will they sell off tomorrow, creating another large drop?

I'm leaning towards us seeing some profit taking tomorrow.




top topics



 
1
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join