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Reinhardt Thread - "Suggestions and Predictions"

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posted on Nov, 16 2008 @ 11:58 AM
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regarding hubris


"Right," said Malaclypse. "They were the innovators in that instance. All the Illuminati were and are neophiles. Even today, they see their work as directed toward progress. They want to become like gods. It's possible for humans, given the right methods, to translate themselves into sentient latticework of pure energy that will be more or less permanent. The process is called transcendental illumination, to distinguish it from the acquisition of insight into the true nature of man and the universe, which is ordinary illumination. I've gone through transcendental illumination and am a being composed altogether of energy, as you may have guessed. However, prior to becoming energy fields men often fall victim to hubris. Their actions cause pain to others and make them insensitive, uncreative and irrational. Mass human sacrifice is the most reliable method of achieving transcendental illumination. Human sacrifice can, of course, be masked as other things, such as war, famine and plague. The vision of the Four Horsemen vouchsafed to Saint John is actually a vision of mass transcendental illumination."


also from RAW




posted on Nov, 16 2008 @ 12:02 PM
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i thought this was interesting:

www.boston.com...




And above all, a depression circa 2009 might be a less visible and more isolating experience. With the diminishing price of televisions and the proliferation of channels, it's getting easier and easier to kill time alone, and free time is one thing a 21st-century depression would create in abundance. Instead of dusty farm families, the icon of a modern-day depression might be something as subtle as the flickering glow of millions of televisions glimpsed through living room windows, as the nation's unemployed sit at home filling their days with the cheapest form of distraction available.



posted on Nov, 16 2008 @ 12:12 PM
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the whole suburban thing is addressed in this article:

www.theatlantic.com...




Falling crime rates have been one of the great American success stories of the past 15 years. New York and Los Angeles, once the twin capitals of violent crime, have calmed down significantly, as have most other big cities. Criminologists still debate why: the crack war petered out, new policing tactics worked, the economy improved for a long spell. Whatever the alchemy, crime in New York, for instance, is now so low that local prison guards are worried about unemployment.

Lately, though, a new and unexpected pattern has emerged, taking criminologists by surprise. While crime rates in large cities stayed flat, homicide rates in many midsize cities (with populations of between 500,000 and 1 million) began increasing, sometimes by as much as 20percent a year. In 2006, the Police Executive Research Forum, a national police group surveying cities from coast to coast, concluded in a report called “A Gathering Storm” that this might represent “the front end … of an epidemic of violence not seen for years.” The leaders of the group, which is made up of police chiefs and sheriffs, theorized about what might be spurring the latest crime wave: the spread of gangs, the masses of offenders coming out of prison, methamphetamines. But mostly they puzzled over the bleak new landscape. According to FBI data, America’s most dangerous spots are now places where Martin Scorsese would never think of staging a shoot-out—Florence, South Carolina; Charlotte-Mecklenburg, North Carolina; Kansas City, Missouri; Reading, Pennsylvania; Orlando, Florida; Memphis, Tennessee.



posted on Nov, 16 2008 @ 12:17 PM
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hehe


Wise investors:

Listen to this audio:

www.nasa.gov...

This is how intelligent humans are supposed..

to communicate.

Not like smart-ass (joke-a-second) Ellen, Letterman and Leno



posted on Nov, 16 2008 @ 12:26 PM
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shermanium has found an interesting article:

www.boston.com...

food for thought



posted on Nov, 16 2008 @ 02:27 PM
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first thought: Are we gonna bail out the suppliers too?

second thought: Who is supplying the plants in Russia and China?

biz.yahoo.com...





NEW YORK (AP) -- The financial woes of U.S. automakers have grabbed Washington's attention, but similar problems at auto suppliers have the potential to set off a cataclysmic chain of events in the industry if key parts makers run out of cash and fail.

As with the automakers, auto suppliers' sales have tumbled this year because of the steep drop in demand for new vehicles.

That has forced suppliers to burn through their cash reserves and slash their costs to stay in business, said Craig Fitzgerald, an automotive analyst with Southfield, Mich.-based Plante & Moran PLLP, which advises about 400 small and midsize auto suppliers.

Meanwhile, banks and other credit providers have become dead-set against lending to any company in the faltering automotive industry, making it difficult and expensive for suppliers to get needed financing.

But if the companies at the bottom of the supply chain don't find a way to recapitalize, Fitzgerald warned, numerous bankruptcies and liquidations among the small companies will set off a string of parts shortages that could reach all the way to the vehicle assembly line.

The resulting disruptions could negate any help the government might give General Motors Corp., Ford Motor Co. and Chrysler LLC.

"Either they deal with the liquidity issues at the lower tier, or these problems have the potential to just devastate the Detroit OEMs and the other automakers," Fitzgerald said, referring to so-called original equipment manufacturers GM, Ford and Chrysler. "It's an issue equal to what's going on at the Big Three, they just don't have the heft, so it doesn't get quite the play."

In most cases, auto suppliers have their own suppliers, who in turn receive their parts from other companies, meaning that many automotive components pass through a chain of several companies before they're sold to an automaker.

"The fragility of the whole thing is very much like a house of cards," said Bob Viswanathan, an assistant professor of operations management at the University at Buffalo School of Management. "Everybody knows that the finance markets are so interconnected, but the auto industry is worse."


[edit on 16-11-2008 by shermanium]



posted on Nov, 16 2008 @ 03:12 PM
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nice find sherm


does that nasa link work for you?



posted on Nov, 16 2008 @ 04:16 PM
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Shermanium... that Baltic Dry Index to get an accurate picture of the economy is nothing short og Genius. Thanks for that!



posted on Nov, 16 2008 @ 05:22 PM
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In support of Reinhardt and his recent efforts, here's the 'print' link to the article he's currently mentioning on his site, its a bit easier to read through. And here's the phrase which really summed up the possibilities to me:

articles/2008/11/16/depression_2009_w hat_would_it_look_like?


"Much of a modern depression would unfold in the domestic sphere: people driving less, shopping less, and eating in their houses more. They would watch television at home; unemployed parents would watch over their own kids instead of taking them to day care. With online banking, it would even be possible to have a bank run in which no one leaves the comfort of their home."



My next question is this: If the g20 means 20 nations, does that mean 20 think-tanks also? Surely the Chinese think-tank-champion sent their think-tank-smart-guy-advisor to the summit, yes? And also did the German and Korean nations also have their best member of their best "think-tank" also attend?

And so therefore, I wonder if any of these think-tanks might also have arrived at the conclusion that this article writer here, has reached? --That the American consumer of the future, need not even leave their home, or even visit their bank? Makes bank runs a thing of the past, eh?

The citizen of the future will be able to insulate themselves within their increasingly insular lives, rarely leaving the house, chatting and web-camming intimately with a core group of friends (probably collegiate chums and similarly worthless relationships)...

Probably they will take less walks into nature, let alone getting away to go camping. Urgh, how horrid and shameful to live in a tent, eh? And virtual nature is superior to actual nature anyway...Because in 2018 or so (by my guess) HDTV v.3-point-oh will allow 3D hummingbirds that'll look so much bigger and really than the real thing!

The real hummingbirds are so darn elusive anyway! At 300 fps in HDTV3D, a hummingbird becomes a true work of art.




It is difficult for ANY human family to compete with their nations' think-tanks (usually think-tanks don't reveal their results to the middle classes) and a competition it becomes, if the people are seen as any kind of 'enemy'.

Nevertheless, I do believe that there is a powerful spirit which assists a family, and familes which band together in the name of truth. I beilieve these smaller corporations/think-tanks (family sized) can produce some of the most beneficial analysis because they can open their hearts and pray to the great Chairperson/Stockholder in the heavens, who said He would bless any gathering of two or more in His name. Cherry-wood conference table not required.


[EDIT: Eh, it won't let me post the PRINT link, so just add ?mode=PF to the end of the URL and you'll get the page which is easier to print and read. Thanks Sherm!]

[edit on 16-11-2008 by smallpeeps]



posted on Nov, 16 2008 @ 06:27 PM
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Another Way To Pretend





posted on Nov, 16 2008 @ 06:32 PM
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hmmm- better build a new bridge then...

New bridge collapses in Kashmir


Three workers are dead and 20 are missing after a bridge being built in Indian-administered Kashmir crashed into the gorge below, police say.



posted on Nov, 16 2008 @ 06:33 PM
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the japanese have announced they are officially in recession.

markets are starting to tank already.



posted on Nov, 16 2008 @ 06:44 PM
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Now Why Would The Church-State Managers..

Want Labor To Assume The Earth..

Is Flat?


I wonder if Galileo Galilei..

would have “insisted” that GM built factories..

in Russia?



posted on Nov, 16 2008 @ 07:01 PM
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hmmm- change of tune from the other day's news. they must have paid big bribes.



posted on Nov, 16 2008 @ 07:29 PM
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I think a good study would be Africa and it's involment in the next bridge, Somalia was on EC today and I think that they should be looked at in relation to the next event.

Russia and Somalia are getting close in a bad way, Somalia is poking a stick at Russia now and Somalia will be mauled soon.

The US would not intervene in that conflict, we still remember "black hawk down".

[edit on 11-16-2008 by LookingAround]



posted on Nov, 16 2008 @ 10:33 PM
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The New Trough

R always says the games is the same



posted on Nov, 17 2008 @ 02:41 AM
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November 16 2008

16/11/2008




posted on Nov, 17 2008 @ 03:09 AM
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uh oh -


General Electric Co. Chief Executive Officer Jeffrey Immelt and Citigroup Inc.’s Vikram Pandit are back to buying their own companies’ shares. That means there may be more stock declines to come.


Immelt’s GE Purchases Signal Sell as Insiders Buy

-----

erm ... "off the books?"


The U.S. Federal Reserve's emergency lending programs, intended to thaw commercial paper and money markets, are also helping banks limit losses from some of their $4 trillion in off-the-books guarantees and loan commitments.


ABCPMMMFLF Spells Fed Relief for JPMorgan, Citi Shadow Banking

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sound the sirens - road and bridge building alert!!!!


CRH Plc of Ireland and Hochtief AG and Siemens AG of Germany lead a list of European building and engineering companies that may benefit from emergency U.S. spending on roads, bridges and power plants.


CRH, Hochtief Look to U.S. Stimulus to Weather Slump

-----



posted on Nov, 17 2008 @ 07:41 AM
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Originally posted by LookingAround
I think a good study would be Africa and it's involment in the next bridge, Somalia was on EC today and I think that they should be looked at in relation to the next event.

Russia and Somalia are getting close in a bad way, Somalia is poking a stick at Russia now and Somalia will be mauled soon.

The US would not intervene in that conflict, we still remember "black hawk down".

[edit on 11-16-2008 by LookingAround]


I found it curious that Somalia was on EC.

I think a war there would be too small be the standard R has hinted at. I thought when I saw it on EC, it may be an indication of what could happen here(?)



posted on Nov, 17 2008 @ 07:57 AM
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Originally posted by verycourious
The New Trough

R always says the games is the same



Nice find. This makes me sick!




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