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Can I talk about religion in school?

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posted on Sep, 28 2008 @ 05:43 PM
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I'm afraid that some college professors may laugh at me for saying pro-religious comments in class.

I'm not very religious but I am somewhat religious... when the discussion allows a religious comment I was wondering what I can say and how I could say it.

I know there are controversies over religion in school. I just want to know what I can and can't do.

[edit on 28-9-2008 by Frankidealist35]




posted on Sep, 28 2008 @ 09:04 PM
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reply to post by Frankidealist35
 

No idea where you live, but I assume you have the fundamental freedom of speech. You can say whatever you want, but I suppose you may be prohibited from proselytizing.

If you're in a class about.....biology, and reply to a question such as "Where do babies come from?" with an answer like "God", you may be laughed at by your professor, probably because even though this may be true, it would still be a gross oversimplification of the answer.



posted on Sep, 28 2008 @ 10:34 PM
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Well, unfortunately, we are living in a world where spiritual and religious views are beginning to become taboo. When "they" took prayer out of school I knew that peoplr with spiritual beliefs would eventually be frowned upon.

Also, you have to realize something. Most professors are secular humanists. They really put no real interest in anything other than what is here in the earth plane.



posted on Sep, 29 2008 @ 04:56 AM
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I think you would be allowed to express religious views in class as long as a) they are relevant and b) you express them with respect for disagreement.

It might be good to preface religious comments with "my religion teaches ..." or something. Don't treat the classroom as an opportunity for proselytizing, but as a place where opinions can be exchanged. Be ready to listen to what other peoples' beliefs are.

The one thing that I would recommend against is trying to debate against evolutionary theory with a science professor. Not being a believer myself, I don't know how this would feel, but I think the best way to take it would be to accept that they are teaching you a model of how things might work; you don't have to agree or disagree, just learn the logic of evolution. If nothing else, it provides a framework for learning about biology and medicine that works.

Be prepared to face disagreement, though I think it will come more from fellow students than professors. Professors might disagree but in the fields in which these topics are most likely to come up (humanities and social sciences), they will also be trained to view issues from multiple sides, and will have the benefit of being mature enough (most of them anyway) to realize that not everyone has to agree with them.

I hope this doesn't come off as too bossy. As a nonbeliever who has spent a lot of time in academic settings, and who is concerned about how these issues are treated (see my "On discussions between..." thread in this forum), I think that believers have a lot to offer "secular humanists", but often come across as self-righteous and patronizing and get ignored or worse.

Hope this helps, and I'd love to hear how it goes through the semester.



posted on Sep, 29 2008 @ 03:18 PM
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Originally posted by Frankidealist35
I'm afraid that some college professors may laugh at me for saying pro-religious comments in class.

I'm not very religious but I am somewhat religious... when the discussion allows a religious comment I was wondering what I can say and how I could say it.

I know there are controversies over religion in school. I just want to know what I can and can't do.



You are permitted to freely exercise your religion, and you have freedom of speech.

Bill of Rights Amendment I:

"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances."



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