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How Serious?

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posted on Sep, 28 2008 @ 04:44 PM
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Hi People,

Well you should know me by now and I like to stir things up, for good or bad, so the question I would like to ask is:

How many of you on here are actually commited to your word? I'd like to know how many people on here actually have a BOB, cache sites, pre-planned escape routes out of the city and emergency medical supplies?

I'm not knocking anyone for doing so, on the contrary I would applause them, I just seem to get the feeling that maybe not everyone is commited as we think.

Your thoughts...

As always
DK


[edit on 28/9/08 by Death_Kron]

[edit on 28/9/08 by Death_Kron]




posted on Sep, 28 2008 @ 04:59 PM
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Hey DK,

Everything I have stated here is genuine. There is much that we know, have learned and have acquired that I haven't mentioned, and likely not going to talk about. Evac plans, we have none, as our option is flying or boating to the capital of our country, which IMO is a far worse option survival-wise. Either that or bugout to Cuba, which is out of the question in our minds.

We don't just have a BOB, we have a bugout kit, and depending upon the perceived severity of the event (hurricane, for example) can be anything from the primary bugout backpacks (2) to the entire emergency supplies/food/water/clothes/hand tools, which takes up about 250 cubic feet of space. The two backpacks -- one Alice pack and another ancient woodframe pack -- contain tools, lighting, food, rope/rescue tools, hygiene things, cooking, knives for the two of us for about a week, except for water.

I don't think it's enough to have supplies and goods...... how many people think it's also important to live as minimally -- in terms of not using power -- as they can?

We do have a cache, near our cave. I supposed the hidden, buried tank of stabilized gasoline could be considered a cache of sorts as well.

Cheers



posted on Sep, 28 2008 @ 05:02 PM
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plucky is ready. I was born ready, freddy, get it?




Although my plan is more high-tail than anything.



posted on Sep, 28 2008 @ 05:04 PM
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I would have, if I had the economic means. But because I haven't had such means, I will probably actually be able to manage better than those who have prepared.



We, the unwilling, led by the unknowing, are doing the impossible for the ungrateful. We have done so much, for so long, with so little, we are now qualified to do anything with nothing.
- Mother Teresa



posted on Sep, 28 2008 @ 05:07 PM
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reply to post by Death_Kron
 


One thing you must take into account is, that not all of us see the world quite the same way and therefore each has in their mind which Sit X's they are prepared or are preparing for and so will be making plans and preps for such.



posted on Sep, 28 2008 @ 05:20 PM
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Originally posted by Death_Kron
Hi People,

Well you should know me by now and I like to stir things up, for good or bad, so the question I would like to ask is:

How many of you on here are actually commited to your word? I'd like to know how many people on here actually have a BOB, cache sites, pre-planned escape routes out of the city and emergency medical supplies?

I'm not knocking anyone for doing so, on the contrary I would applause them, I just seem to get the feeling that maybe not everyone is commited as we think.

Your thoughts...

As always
DK


[edit on 28/9/08 by Death_Kron]

[edit on 28/9/08 by Death_Kron]


Bob - Check,
Catche - Check,
Preplanned escape route - Check
Emergency Medical Supplies - Those that I carry only.



posted on Sep, 28 2008 @ 05:37 PM
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i have 3 bobs, one thats all weapons of diffrent types, axes, knives, crossbows (with extra strings, bolts, and oil), home made items such as bollos, throwing sticks, wrist rocket (with extra bands, hardware and shot) ect. the second contains some tools, equipment, food prep gear,fishing accesories ect. the 3rd has clothes for me and the wife plus some first aid gear and long lasting medications. i have some food set aside with long shelf lives, as well as other useables like paper towls and toilet paper.

because where we live theres many options for places to go i have 7-8 diffrent routes set with locations for hidieng during persuit figuerd in.

im on a fixed income so i cant purches much but most of the gear iv had before i moved hear that i collected through the years. i have no caches but i know where all the best hunting, fishing, and scrounging areas are and im well versed in scamming and phreaking as well as social enginering for use in urban areas.



posted on Sep, 28 2008 @ 08:20 PM
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We have our go-bags, food, camping gear ect. Last three deer that I killed went to 100% jerky that we made. Already live in one of the lowest population density places in the lower 48. Green house check, own water well check, garden check, firearms check, fire wood check, wood stove check, 4x4 and trailer check, house set up for no electric power check, skills set always improving on them. House and land payed off check. No loans outstanding check.

My wife and I read "Lucifers (spl?) Hammer" in school a long time ago, it had a big effect on both of us. I have always looked for jobs in small towns, two stop light rule. We starting this program about 30 years ago and have been through a number of events but being set up for bad times made them just a small adventure. I read Mel Tappen (spl?) when it was not cool, he was one of the early writers telling folks to be ready to take care of themselves. Any one who expects tomorrow to be just like today or yesterday is not taking care of their family.

I have I spent a lot of money on things I may never use, I hope so. It is just like insurance on your car or house, kind of like reverse life insurance.

Next week my wife and I will be going to look at a more remote place. There are places out there at this time that can be cashed out that have a lot of promise. With the current economic state I figure our money being tied up in land that we have a title to is better than having it in a bank.

Been walking the walk for about 30 years.



posted on Sep, 28 2008 @ 09:05 PM
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reply to post by waterdoctor
 



I have I spent a lot of money on things I may never use, I hope so. It is just like insurance on your car or house, kind of like reverse life insurance.


Perfectly said; insurance is betting against yourself, whereas acquiring a few goods you hope to not need is betting ON yourself.

If the goods are acquired over time, a little at a time, the pocketbook pain is minimal. Best "goods" off all are pretty much free - skills and knowledge.

_____________

Op, I forgot to add; We keep a fairly extensive med kit. Only problem that I can see is that I cannot find a place to acquire sterile suture packs, and I know they don't last forever. There are materials I could use in a pinch. hmmm. Same materials I DID once use in a pinch as I recall.



posted on Sep, 28 2008 @ 09:17 PM
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"Only problem that I can see is that I cannot find a place to acquire sterile suture packs," Go to a feed store, they sell them for sewing up livestock. Had to sew up my horse after he got cut. Also you can boil dacron fishing line and use it if in a pinch, had to use this and a carpet needle on another horse when we couldn't get a vet to come out. Now I am not saying that I would do this on a regular day to day, but in a pinch it will work. Also super glue can be used to close clean cuts. When hunting I carry safety pins in a small vile of alcohol. If I get cut bad when out by myself I figure I can use the safety pins a lot easier than I can sew myself up.



posted on Sep, 28 2008 @ 09:24 PM
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For many here preparedness is a way of life not a hobby. We recently went through a sustained power outage thanks to the after effects of the hurricane. We missed very little and actually had more time for family as we helper with the clean up process. The only things we lost were a few trees. Thanks to being prepared.

respectfully

reluctantpawn



posted on Sep, 29 2008 @ 03:21 AM
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Each member of my family has there own BOB with some bits interchangable such as batteries for flashlights, same type of compass etc

I have three caches used to be four but I screwed up and a new road got built over one a few years ago


The house has back up heat supplies in the form of bottled gas heater, Light in the form of boat loads of candles and lanterns, plus light sticks which I buy at a 100 at a time cos it works out damn cheap.

The Van has its own bug out and extra tools kit in it.

I have a Bug Out Vest as well as some modified tactical clothing and footwear.

My Bug out Vehicle is a modified Transit Van 2.5 diesel fitted out with 3 berths, Toilets, Kitchen, 3 x minus 18 sleeping bags, water and fod containers, extra fuel cans etc.

Look folks getting ready and prepared is not expensive is you are sensible, spend two quid aweek extra on groceries such as tinned meat and veg, buy the large containers of flour, pasta, rice when they are on offer at Tesco or Makro. Next time you have to change your vehicle add the bug out concept to your list of requiements, but for now even the most humble vehicle can be modded to serve as a BOV



posted on Sep, 29 2008 @ 03:47 AM
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I've had a BoB for a bit over a month...

It's light, no fuss.

It started off with just a first aid kit and a radio. Now it includes an Esbit burner and fuel, dynamo torch, 2 watt handheld UHF radio (very popular in Australia), water purification and filtration, toiletries, candles, wire snips, small survival knife, Silva compass and topographic maps, butt load of AA batteries, loud whistle, rations, and a few other bits and pieces.

Still a work in progress, but I'm in the 'aware of emergencies' category not the sit x category...

But we'll see how the world progresses (or regresses).



posted on Sep, 29 2008 @ 03:55 AM
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Originally posted by mattguy404
I've had a BoB for a bit over a month...

It's light, no fuss.

It started off with just a first aid kit and a radio. Now it includes an Esbit burner and fuel, dynamo torch, 2 watt handheld UHF radio (very popular in Australia), water purification and filtration, toiletries, candles, wire snips, small survival knife, Silva compass and topographic maps, butt load of AA batteries, loud whistle, rations, and a few other bits and pieces.

Still a work in progress, but I'm in the 'aware of emergencies' category not the sit x category...

But we'll see how the world progresses (or regresses).


Hi, If you are Urban as are most Aussies can In respectfully suggest a small pry bar be added to your kit, Great for opening jammed lift doors, tube train and bus doors, breaking windows, lifting water tank covers etc
Respects
NR



posted on Sep, 29 2008 @ 03:58 AM
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Originally posted by waterdoctor

My wife and I read "Lucifers (spl?) Hammer" in school a long time ago, it had a big effect on both of us.


Can I reccomend you read Alas Babylon by Pat Franks and
Patriots by James Wesley Rawles

Respects
NR



posted on Oct, 3 2008 @ 04:17 PM
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reply to post by Northern Raider
 


I think that I have read Alas Babylon a long time ago but I will look for Patriots next time we are in the city. If you have not had a chance the "Foxfire" books are very good. We have the first 7.

Heading out in the morning to look at a retreat. Put the go bag in the 4x4 with some of the required traveling equipment. Hi-lift jack, axe, shovel, tow chain, rope, extra spare tire, savage .223 over 12 gauge and two sets of tire chains. Have a carry permit so the 1911 always goes too.



posted on Oct, 4 2008 @ 11:21 PM
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For me prepeardness has always been important. It has never governed my life though, which I may regret if the # really hits the fan, since I am not always 100% prepeared, but feel I really should be. There are some things lacking that I should have prepeared, but time, location, friends, girlfriend and economy are naturally factors that all get in the way from time to time. At 24 years old I am still young, and I let living my life go before full-out survivalism very often.

I have been blessed with an upbringing and a personality that more than often put me in non-sheltered situations.

The experience, knowledge and mentality that comes with the above is what I feel is my greatest strenght in a potential survival situation. I have always recognized the value of tools though.

What I carry with me at any given time is always a result of a thought out kit-mentality.

EDC:I have my EDC bag that contains first aid equipement, flashlight, folding-knife, notebook, cell phone, paracord and a custom tin-box mini-survival kit in addition to my belt-worn multitool.

B.O.B: I have one, and my girlfriend has one. They are both well-stocked. My B.O.B is a serious thing for me. I try to improve it constantly, and I take it hiking in the mountains for at least an hour minimum three days a week, and with my buddies on at least 5 hour mountain hikes every other week.

Home Emergency Kit:: A hand-crank/solar power/battery/adapter SW/AM/FM radio, a solid flashlight (there are always 4 other flashlights around the house when we are at home), tons of batteries, two ultra-light-weight sleeping bags, paracord, a mora knife wrapped in bandanas, a small first aid-kit and a multitool. A pelican box is on it's way from the US now to replace my drawer.

Work B.O.B: Work in progress, but it is comming together very nicely, especially supplemented by my EDC. At work we also have an abundancy of tools, machinery, first-aid equipement, materials, vehicles and some very useful people, including a machinist, an engineer, and an ex-navy radio operator. Being at work when the SHTF would be a good thing.

BOV:I have a Jeep Wrangler that I drive. I won't lie and say that the jeep was not a choice I made with prepearness in mind, but I have always known my first car would be a jeep anyway. My mom also drives one. In the Jeep I have a well-stocked first aid kit, a well-stocked tool box, 2 x artic temp sleeping bags, a good lenght of climbing rope, a shovel, tire chains, towing line, a box of emergency rations, extra gas that is rotated and the regular auto-safety stuff like jump-cables, emergency triangle, spare tire and lift-jack. The car came with a good lift, off-road tires and an awsome steel-bumper. Apperantly the previous owner whent offroad with it a lot.

That is it really. Sounds a lot when it is all typed out like this, but it's a lot less than a lot of you others I'm sure.

What I dont have:

House: A decent freezer. A good water and food storage. A safe shelter/room. A generator. I have no off-the-grid energy alternatives apart from batteries, I have no off-the-grid supply of water. I have no off-the-grid supply of food apart from hunting, which I do far away from my apartement. The meat is stored at my mom's place.

Car: Decent water storage. A B.O.B... it would be a nice thing to have if I have to bug out from my car, which is not a very far-fetched idea. A winch (on my todo list), roof lights (on my todo list). Things I dream of is a snorkle and some armor :p

BOL: I lack a good Bug out location. My family have a cabin which would be ideal if it was not located so high up the mountain that I need a snow-mobile to get to it from late fall to spring, and have to deal with constant sub-zero temperatures down to -30 celcius at times. My only options are to Bug In, or to bug out to someone I know at a better location

Caches: Love the concept. Defiantly on my todo list.



[edit on 4-10-2008 by me_ofef_seraph]




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