It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Water on mars see for yourself to believe it!!!

page: 1
2
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Sep, 27 2008 @ 03:45 AM
link   
Hi everyone came across this in the HIRISE images collection it is titled, "Dark Spot Near Olypmus Mons Volcano".

The image was apparently taken near the olympus mons volcano, the largest volcano in the solar system, and it is inactive one, and in the image, there is this blue lake, though NASA release states that it is basaltic sand or dust free bedrock, it doesnt look like that all, the image clearly shows liquid water and also the proximity to the volcano suggests that the water might have been collected through the crater.



These dark spots are distinctive because much of the surrounding area appears to be covered by light-toned dust. In pre-HiRISE images, the origin of this dark spot was ambiguous. This HiRISE image reveals that the dark color is likely the result of accumulations of basaltic sand (smooth, blue-colored material in the color swath) on top of otherwise relatively dust-free bedrock.


Here's the link, see for yourself,

hirise.lpl.arizona.edu...




posted on Sep, 27 2008 @ 03:49 AM
link   
The website seems to be down


Can you insert the image here?



posted on Sep, 27 2008 @ 03:51 AM
link   
It is working fine for me, Ill just post the 800*600 wallpaper,





posted on Sep, 27 2008 @ 03:53 AM
link   



posted on Sep, 27 2008 @ 03:55 AM
link   
reply to post by altered_states
 


Thanks for posting, can you tell me how you did that.



posted on Sep, 27 2008 @ 04:02 AM
link   
I will u2u with instructions peacejet



posted on Sep, 27 2008 @ 04:05 AM
link   
reply to post by altered_states
 


Got the u2u, thanks.

This is not a one liner.



posted on Sep, 27 2008 @ 04:08 AM
link   
it's not water.... apart from looking at the picture below and realising that when water is laid down on a surface it remains flat. the bottom of the picture looks like a huge wave there but is actually raised ground...

As quoted from the website that you provided: which im guessing you didn't read.
hirise.lpl.arizona.edu...
"This image covers a relatively dark-toned patch of ground west of the Olympus Mons volcano. This spot is one of several dark areas in this region of Mars.

These dark spots are distinctive because much of the surrounding area appears to be covered by light-toned dust. In pre-HiRISE images, the origin of this dark spot was ambiguous. This HiRISE image reveals that the dark color is likely the result of accumulations of basaltic sand (smooth, blue-colored material in the color swath) on top of otherwise relatively dust-free bedrock."



posted on Sep, 27 2008 @ 04:10 AM
link   
reply to post by DaRAGE
 


I see your point, but just look below the upper rock and you will see that the sand is distributed in the form of waves, and if it is only sand why is its colour instensity different at various points, it should have been even,



posted on Sep, 27 2008 @ 04:11 AM
link   
Just to let you know, neither the shades of gray or the blue in that picture are the true real color. It's some sort of camera mode that makes it out to be like that. So if you were basing your decision on the color, then rethink it.

Whether or not that's water is a topic i don't really care for, besides, wasn't it confirmed a few weeks back that they have found frozen water on mars with the phoenix lander? Maybe my memory is messing me up.



posted on Sep, 27 2008 @ 04:27 AM
link   
Oh come on guys please do post your opinion regarding this, I am waiting for your replies.



posted on Sep, 27 2008 @ 05:52 AM
link   
To be honest, to me, it doesn't look like water, I can't help noticing a 'grained effect' on it, yet for all I know, NASA has photoshopped this bad boy, afterall, what was photoshop invented for?


The waves also seem to be 'wind disturbances' on the sand, they're to far apart to be waves I think, although, I'm probably wrong.


I do think there is water on Mars, and possibly alot more, but IMO, this isn't conclusive, could be, but it may not be aswell, the colours are beautiful though. IF you want to see water on Mars, have a look at this, seems to be a puddle underneath the Rover?:



I'm sure this has been shown before but oh well.

EMM

Edit to add: If this was water, I doubt NASA would leave it blue, they would hue it with red, so as to divert attention, the fact that it is blue makes me question.

[edit on 27-9-2008 by ElectroMagnetic Multivers]



posted on Sep, 27 2008 @ 05:59 AM
link   
Although I am not qualified or smart enough to make an indepth analysis of this pic. Even NASA has said Mars was once a water world.

To believe pockets still exist is not outside the realm of imagination.



posted on Sep, 27 2008 @ 03:56 PM
link   
reply to post by peacejet
 


Why should the color be even?

On Mars (and on Earth) there are many places that dust and soil deposits are darker in some places than in other places -- i.e. not all dirt is the same color.

Plus, he sand you said is distributed in the form of waves simply looks like parallel sand dunes -- the type that are very common on Mars.

So besides the fact that the picture is blue (which is false color, by the way -- blue is often used in fasle color images because it contrasts well with the browns and yellow) I don't see any evidence that is a picture of water.

I know it was proven that water ice exists on Mars, but water itself would sublimate away due to the low atmospheric pressures.

[edit on 9/27/2008 by Soylent Green Is People]



posted on Sep, 27 2008 @ 07:57 PM
link   

Originally posted by ElectroMagnetic Multivers
Edit to add: If this was water, I doubt NASA would leave it blue, they would hue it with red, so as to divert attention, the fact that it is blue makes me question.

Yes, I accept your opinion, but it looked so much like water, and had me amazed for a moment, thats why I posted it here.



posted on Sep, 27 2008 @ 08:01 PM
link   

Originally posted by jpm1602
To believe pockets still exist is not outside the realm of imagination.


Yes, there is a possibility, and the close proximity to the extinct olympus mons suggest that if it is water, it might be a overflow of water from the crater caught in the form of the reservoir between the two mountains, and it sure looks more like a lake seeing that the bottom half is more in slope than the top half.



posted on Sep, 27 2008 @ 08:05 PM
link   

Originally posted by Soylent Green Is People
reply to post by peacejet
 

I know it was proven that water ice exists on Mars, but water itself would sublimate away due to the low atmospheric pressures.

[edit on 9/27/2008 by Soylent Green Is People]


Liquid water is found during the early morning times when the temperature is a lot cooler as you would have seen in the phoenix mission images of the liquid water and frost forming in the early morning time, and considering that it is near olympus mons and it is higher than the plains the temperature if a lot cooler and can allow water to exist without evaporating.



posted on Sep, 27 2008 @ 10:44 PM
link   
I'm one to think Mars is abundant with water, but in this case, I don't think we are looking at water.

Pros:
-The "wave-like" eroded sand.
-The small rock inside the dark blue, just above the lower large rock.
-It's blue. Although false color, it kind of makes the mind think water.

Cons:
-It's blue! Although false color, NASA wouldn't make it so easy. Usually when water is pictured, they turn it to sand.
-Where's the source/s?
-The other so-called dark spots in the image.
-Did I mention it's blue?


That's my take. Thanks for posting. Flagged.



posted on Sep, 27 2008 @ 11:09 PM
link   
When looking for water I think we should also remember that the gravity on mars is lower compared to earth. How would this affect how the water behaves?



posted on Sep, 27 2008 @ 11:47 PM
link   

www.marsanomalyresearch.com...



Note that the interior contents of these two depressions are a very light and very bright color. One might assume that this may be because of the presence of highly reflective ice conditions. Such an assumption would conveniently in turn enable the perception and following arguments that this ice is probably CO2 ice. However that just isn't the case here. Note that the flat level interior surface and the obvious narrow band of sloped bare shore between the true liquid waterline and the darker background shore as pointed out by my labeling are both very light color. In my opinion, this is because of an application of light color semitransparent (opaque) smudge image tampering was mapped and applied equally to both the bare sloped shore narrow band and the flat water surface together.

Now, if it had been applied thick enough in enough layers, the evidence of flat level liquid waterline as differentiated from the narrow band of sloped shore evidence would have been merged together and eliminated. That is typical of how effectively obscuring water sites goes in this planetary Mars imaging as it has been released to us. Fortunately for us liquid water depth because of its transparency absorbs more light than it reflects and is normally a darker color preserving the water here as a very slightly darker color and thereby the faintly seen waterline demarcation line effect is preserved. Also, the narrow band of reflective sloped shore as above water terrain was already a lighter reflective color in the natural sunlight. So the tampering application made it even lighter maintaining to some extent the contrast difference between the water and narrow band of sloped shore to preserve the irregular waterline demarcation line.

This type of tampering is typical of how the visuals of the natural visual qualities of liquid surface water are hidden from view in the Mars satellite science data imaging. I have seen a great many much more effective applications, especially around and on the South Polar Cap itself. Most of the time these applications are successful at merging the water and shore into a false single flattened visual effect intended to and relatively effectively mimicking an ice field, at least as it appears in the compromised quality distant satellite imaging as released to us. Remember, if it can be made to appear to be solid form ice, then it can in turn be argued that it is CO2 ice rather than water ice. At the very least, doubt is introduced and, when in doubt, who are you going to believe a lone individual like me or the whole scientific world?




The photos are tampered with before they reach our eyes, and Nasa attempts to make us conclude standing water is co2 ice. There are many analysts that catch these things.
Then there's the forest....

[edit on 27-9-2008 by mystiq]




top topics



 
2
<<   2 >>

log in

join