Help ATS with a contribution via PayPal:
learn more

Bush Pre Speech/Post Speech Thoughts and Dissection

page: 2
6
<< 1    3  4  5 >>

log in

join

posted on Sep, 24 2008 @ 08:34 PM
link   
He probably mentioned 10 years because that is probably where the root causes are, if not longer. If he had said 15 years I would agree with him, and that is rare.

If you look back 15 years ago, there was a lot of deregulation on the banks; and this after the 80's banking crisis, which is exactly the same thing we have now. I would be interested in knowing if the loss in the late 80's is equal to the loss now in how much that loss would be worth now. If they are comparable, the problem could be fixed; and most likely with out the government interference.

The problem, or root, could be considered when the bill was passed that allowed banks to be a "one stop shop" of sorts. This allowed certain companies, as he mentioned, to get to big. The blame is on the government, but greed by bankers and individuals must not be excluded.




posted on Sep, 24 2008 @ 08:34 PM
link   
I'm just so tired of the BS no value pompous "american pride" empty words that Bush constantly uses to cram down our throats. i hope people in kansas and nebraska aren't taking that rhetoric seriously. bottomine is pride is a deadly sin and Bush did nothing but TERRORIZE the people of the USA (AGAIN!) by spreading BS rumors and lies and sugar coating them with prideful american slogans that strokes the ego...he deserves you know what.



posted on Sep, 24 2008 @ 08:42 PM
link   
The really truly bad things that our government does to us are usually bi-partisan. This is a perfect example. Notice that McCain and Obama are on board as well. I think I'm going to write another nasty letter to my Senators and Rep after I post this.

Just how in the hell can they justify continuing to reward those who are responsible for this crap after they reaped such rewards during it. We have truly crossed the threshold into the territory of banana republic. No government has ever survived a hyperinflationary environment and if they go that route, ours will be no different. I personally think that institutions that are able to unload their crap assetts onto the taxpayer won't start lending again anyway. The banks benefit more from a deflationary collapse than a hyperinflationary one anyway.

Oh yeah where the hell have all the market cheerleaders been lately. I havn't seen any of them on here since before the FNM/FRE bailout legislation.



posted on Sep, 24 2008 @ 08:48 PM
link   
God I want to say something that would get me in so much trouble. All these hill buggers are bought and sold.



posted on Sep, 24 2008 @ 08:53 PM
link   
reply to post by ChrisJr03
 


In 2001 we entered a "real" recession, several quarters of negative GDP ..

Then we had the housing boom, high inflation and we saw jobs move over seas.. but the increase in equity was so huge, it looked as if we got out of the recession .. even though by economic "terms" we had, but given the situation, did we really? .. The bubble burst and now we have to fall, fall, fall .. because when you # with the economy in a Capitalist society, it doesn't matter what you do IT WILL CORRECT IT'S SELF.

I think Skeptic Overlord had better give all us ATS who predicted this a few years ago shiny little stars that say "HAHA ATS'ers we actually got one right!"



posted on Sep, 24 2008 @ 08:57 PM
link   
Why do I have dejavu?

Didn't this same man assure us that his course of action (first in Iraq) now with regard to the bailout was the correct one - to trust him, to understand the immediate need for action?

Two things I noted - 1) no details until the money is approved and 2) changes in policy/regulation/oversight (or the lack thereof) are to be determined at a later date.

I've heard this plea before and I simply do not trust a word he says. I want to know a whole lot more before this is approved.

B.



posted on Sep, 24 2008 @ 09:01 PM
link   
9 years ago congress passed and Bill Clinton signed into law the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act which for the most part overthrew the Glass-Steagall Act of 1933 Which is the root Cause of today collapse.

no one learned the lessons of the S&L crisis of the 80's and early 90's. The lesson is that you cannot remove the regulations on the finical system because when the cat is away the mice will play.

I've been asking the last few days since the draft proposal was leaked Saturday why should the American taxpayers Bailout these guys that lobbied congress to deregulate the system make it harder for the average American to discharge their debt, that took the risks and are now expecting the tax payers to bail them out of the Mess they created.

Oh and top it off they don't want the taxpayers to receive the profits from bailing them out.

Bush said it all. under normal circumstances he would allow these business to fail. he should go ahead and do it now. I'd rather weather the storm now then wait until its a cat 5 hurricane barreling down on us and does more destruction than if we would have just took the hit now.



posted on Sep, 24 2008 @ 09:10 PM
link   
I found the medical infliction causing this.

It is ALS.
(Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis)
found here titled:
Keeping you plugged in-PSA
www.youtube.com...

This is what happened to Congress the other day for 4-5 seconds after the Bernake explaination of What's up.

Now, it is effecting Bush...Paleness is a symptom as is bad feed in todays high tech News-advanced tech that fails miserably at key hyper-important moments?....Cut....Bush Addresses the Nation on Finance, Take 42..and...Action!



posted on Sep, 24 2008 @ 09:14 PM
link   
What happened to bird-flipping George Bush? He delivered the speech standing up with this apologetic demeanor and the amount of unexpected sincerity. . . Maybe George Bush didn't feel well.

I wonder who wrote the speech. To me it was perfect: the introduction, the causes of the problem, the remedies and the consequences of not implementing the remedies, mentioning the bad guys and the remedies concerning them . . . I liked it.



posted on Sep, 24 2008 @ 09:17 PM
link   
That is a joke right? Sometimes I don't understand so good. Pictures and hand puppets help me.



posted on Sep, 24 2008 @ 09:19 PM
link   
He was surrounded by a team of national Champion Fencers today at White House. I would be a bit nervous as well.



posted on Sep, 24 2008 @ 09:49 PM
link   
I'm behind McCain for some reason however:

After seeing bush raise the earth's temperature 5 degrees for his 15 minutes of hot air and various regurgitated anal gases I almost cried watching Clinton right after on CNN.

Everybody loves Bucko Bill and deep down, long as he has a little nookie, he's a pretty interesting character that brings out more smiles and puts a listener / viewer at ease like a lullaby.

Bottom line is that we, again, need an unforgiving salesman to fix this mess.

McCain is not him.
Obama is not him.
Paul would be the only one with FAITH IN HIS PRODUCT and the uplifting spirit to boot!

CAN WE GET RON PAUL ELECTED>!>!>!>!>!>!>!>!>!?????

*****RON PAUL WRITE IN BOMB!!!*****
YES!~



posted on Sep, 24 2008 @ 09:51 PM
link   
Was it just me, or did he not once refer to us as his "fellow Americans"?
It may be nothing, but to me it implied that he held himself separate from the populace.

As far as what he did say, I noticed that he only mentioned a couple of reasons why we are in the mess we're in now, when everyone knows that there are a lot more reasons then those he mentioned.

All in all, I think it was a pretty weak speech considering the depth and immediacy of the problem at hand. I think the plan he's pushing sucks and won't accomplish anything in the long run but to make more money for those who have already made a fortune off of their lack of forethought and business savvy.



posted on Sep, 24 2008 @ 09:56 PM
link   
To pin this all on Bush is ridiculous. It was good ol' slick Willy himself who let anyone who could walk get a loan. Now, we're seeing all those billions of dollars that were leant out not being paid out. This problem didn't materialize overnight, and I would expect the users at ATS to recognize that fact...

Edit to add-

To the post above mine, "fellow Americans" does not imply that he holds himself seperate from the populace. I'm not sure how you could misconstrue the meaning of that...

[edit on 24-9-2008 by Ketzer22]



posted on Sep, 24 2008 @ 09:57 PM
link   

Originally posted by loam
I can think of no better argument against this bailout than the fact *he* is for it.




well that would explain why we got it in the UK with such glaring color.
it was like when you set your tv with to much color. his skin looked orange almost.



posted on Sep, 24 2008 @ 10:04 PM
link   
After listening to what he said about the plan it sorta makes sense. It'd be like any other investor- buying while things are cheap.. he said the government was going to hold all of them until the economy shapes up and then I would imagine they'll resell them.. Pretty good idea if you ask me. Hopefully there'll be a sort of tax rebate check for all of us when those stocks do rise.



posted on Sep, 24 2008 @ 10:12 PM
link   
Ya, you weren't the only one to miss my fellow American. I would have more expected my fellow elite. Very good catch!

Originally posted by subject x
Was it just me, or did he not once refer to us as his "fellow Americans"?
It may be nothing, but to me it implied that he held himself separate from the populace.

As far as what he did say, I noticed that he only mentioned a couple of reasons why we are in the mess we're in now, when everyone knows that there are a lot more reasons then those he mentioned.

All in all, I think it was a pretty weak speech considering the depth and immediacy of the problem at hand. I think the plan he's pushing sucks and won't accomplish anything in the long run but to make more money for those who have already made a fortune off of their lack of forethought and business savvy.



posted on Sep, 24 2008 @ 10:17 PM
link   
reply to post by Ketzer22
 



Personally, I would blame Greenspan.



posted on Sep, 24 2008 @ 10:21 PM
link   
reply to post by Rockpuck
 


Yea, Greenspan is a good bet too.. really just that whole group that was in power during the time... But ultimately the problem was the lending of a) nearly infinite lines of credit and b) lending to people who had (after a little research) no way of paying the money back. It was just complete irresponsibility by the people in charge during the Clinton years and now Bush has to deal with the cards he has been dealt.

[edit on 24-9-2008 by Ketzer22]



posted on Sep, 24 2008 @ 10:24 PM
link   

Originally posted by jpm1602
He's been looking pale and ill since his last meeting with Putin at the olympics. He looks like hell.



That's the pressure of the job, for you. Even if you don't know what your doing.

I think what we saw was a clone. I mean did you see him blink??


Talk about emotionless....I think he's a Vulcan...\\ //






top topics



 
6
<< 1    3  4  5 >>

log in

join