How should I approach philosophy?

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posted on Sep, 23 2008 @ 10:17 PM
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I am reading a book called A Concise Introduction to Philosophy. It's like a text-book.

I remember when I last tried reading this book I gave up on reading the book because I didn't like studying it... I thought it was silly of me to take it too seriously. Now I'm a little more mature than I was when I was last studying philosophy so I can take the matter more seriously without it destroying the world-views that I have.

I am curious. How should I go about studying philosophy? Should I take a careful approach to philosophy? I know the subject can potentially be damaging to certain people.

[edit on 23-9-2008 by Frankidealist35]




posted on Sep, 23 2008 @ 10:24 PM
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look for that which strengthens your preseant beliefs then become curious and look at the broader spectrum. or just go page by page molding it o yourself as you go.



posted on Sep, 23 2008 @ 10:26 PM
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I don't know you personally so don't take this as an attack:

Don't read philosophy if you arent' looking to expand your horizons.

It's going to raise new questions. Some of it is going to try to raise humanity above the level of God or even say that there is no God.

If you aren't ready to read that, or you're only trying to read it in order to point out the futility of humanism, or something like that... don't bother.

Unfortunately though, I am not the one to tell you where to start, who to read first, although I would think that would kind of depend if there is any specific you are preoccupied with.

My .02



posted on Sep, 23 2008 @ 10:44 PM
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Basically what I do with philosophy is read it, appreciate it, think about it, then take away from it what I like and agree with and believe in and try to apply it to my own life.


:



posted on Sep, 23 2008 @ 10:49 PM
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Everything that was really important to me in life I learned in kindergarten.



posted on Sep, 23 2008 @ 10:50 PM
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My personal suggestion, but I am biased because I do love philosophy so much, is that you start by reading through the general topics which you find the most interesting...this will get you to really enjoy thinking about your reasons for many beliefs.

That said, I agree with asmeone2 that you shouldn't read the subjects which you are currently whoelheartedly opinionated on...I did that and it caused me to spend about a year intensely questioning my very foundation of belief (in my instance, it was God).

Whatever you do, good luck and I hope you find yourself more open-minded and rational!



posted on Oct, 5 2008 @ 04:50 PM
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reply to post by Kashodi
 


Yep...apply philosophy to yourself, not the other way round.

It's easier to understand what you already know and to use that for further knowledge in the things you don't.

Good luck.



posted on Oct, 10 2008 @ 10:12 PM
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Ok... I just finished reading the book and I learned all about introductory stuff about Philosophy.

What should I do next?

I have a book about what different philosophers think. Now that I know a bit about philosophical concepts should I read about what specific philosophers think or should I read more about individual concepts like free will?



posted on Oct, 10 2008 @ 10:16 PM
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Originally posted by Frankidealist35
Ok... I just finished reading the book and I learned all about introductory stuff about Philosophy.

What should I do next?

I have a book about what different philosophers think. Now that I know a bit about philosophical concepts should I read about what specific philosophers think or should I read more about individual concepts like free will?


Why not both?
Just read a little bit in general, you'll begin to find topics that interest you and be able to focus on them.

Or you m ay find that you don't like philosophy at all, and that's okay too.



posted on Oct, 10 2008 @ 10:23 PM
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Originally posted by Frankidealist35
I am reading a book called A Concise Introduction to Philosophy. It's like a text-book.

I remember when I last tried reading this book I gave up on reading the book because I didn't like studying it... I thought it was silly of me to take it too seriously. Now I'm a little more mature than I was when I was last studying philosophy so I can take the matter more seriously without it destroying the world-views that I have.

I am curious. How should I go about studying philosophy? Should I take a careful approach to philosophy? I know the subject can potentially be damaging to certain people.

[edit on 23-9-2008 by Frankidealist35]


Um.. I'm going to try and not sound like an ass... but come on ..

It's philosophy for one thing.. it's theorizing, looking at patterns and most times outlandishly uncritical critical thinking.

Another thing... wtf do you mean by destroy the world-views that you have? do you think they are real? or the "right" view? It's called a collaboration of everything you've been subject to..... imagine the day you turn off the sponge that soaks this world up is the day you are severely out of tune with reality, because it is constantly changing.

Potentially damaging? .. please provide some evidence? what the heck are you talking about? ... do you not understand what philosophy is?

What philosophy are you talking about anyway? .. there is Greek Philosophy, American Philosophy, Eastern Indian Philosophy, New Philosophy, and Old Philosophy.. ... and then there are a million things in between.

Maybe you came to the right place if you're asking this question, because it sounds like you're scared of believing things other than what you already believe....

[edit on 10/10/2008 by PuRe EnErGy]



posted on Oct, 10 2008 @ 10:38 PM
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reply to post by PuRe EnErGy
 


If you have studied philosophy you would know about how philosophy can radically challenge the existing views that you have, perhaps, even destroying some of them.

Philosophy has already challenged what I have thought about God, and, Free will, and, it has challenged what I have thought about moral judgments regarding behavior.

So given that, philosophy challenges one's perception of what one already holds to them. I hope that clears up some of what I said about philosophy possibly destroying views that you previously have.



posted on Oct, 10 2008 @ 10:40 PM
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reply to post by asmeone2
 


I actually love philosophy. Science sometimes bores me, but philosophy really makes science interesting by giving me ways to think about science.

Hey... which philosophers do you think I should study first? Do you have any recommendations?



posted on Oct, 10 2008 @ 10:41 PM
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reply to post by Frankidealist35
 





How should I approach philosophy?


With a closed mind, how else...?




posted on Oct, 10 2008 @ 10:43 PM
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reply to post by chapter29
 


You're kidding aren't you?



posted on Oct, 10 2008 @ 10:47 PM
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Originally posted by Frankidealist35
reply to post by asmeone2
 


I actually love philosophy. Science sometimes bores me, but philosophy really makes science interesting by giving me ways to think about science.

Hey... which philosophers do you think I should study first? Do you have any recommendations?


I'm not into philosophy to give you a personal favorite. I feel the other way, cience is interesting, philosophy bores me.

But I might reccoment that you start with the ones that have had the biggest impact on history?

Socretes, Plato, Aristotle, Voltaire, Locke, Marx, Neitzche, Bertrand Russell... some names that come to mind.


[edit on 10-10-2008 by asmeone2]



posted on Oct, 10 2008 @ 10:53 PM
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Originally posted by Frankidealist35
reply to post by PuRe EnErGy
 


If you have studied philosophy you would know about how philosophy can radically challenge the existing views that you have, perhaps, even destroying some of them.

Philosophy has already challenged what I have thought about God, and, Free will, and, it has challenged what I have thought about moral judgments regarding behavior.

So given that, philosophy challenges one's perception of what one already holds to them. I hope that clears up some of what I said about philosophy possibly destroying views that you previously have.



Laugh out Loud.. sooo funny....

I know it can... what's the big deal? are you afraid that thinking in different ways may have a negative impact on .. ? your after-life?

I hope philosophy destroys everything it touches, I wouldn't want to be stuck thinking a certain way my entire life.

Check out Plotinus as well if you want to study philosophy like the above mentioned by asmeone2.



[edit on 10/10/2008 by PuRe EnErGy]



posted on Oct, 10 2008 @ 10:56 PM
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reply to post by Frankidealist35
 


Absolutely...that was just the GG talking!

BTW -a good recommendation to start you out on your philosophical journey would be to read Nietzsche, as he has a very positive and motivating take on life...






grammar edit!

[edit on 10/10/2008 by chapter29]





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