It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

The Books of the Bible. One may not be God's Word?

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Sep, 23 2008 @ 08:43 AM
link   
Why is it that besides the Song of Solomon,
The only Book in the Bible that never mentions
God, Lord, or Jesus, is the Book of Esther?

There are a few books that don't mention all three names,
but they all mention one, two, or all three Besides Esther.

In the Bible, if it is the word of God, does this mean
that God, through "man" in God's spirit, writing the Bible, did not author this book?
If so, then is the Book of Esther not of God?

What is the purpose of staying out of this book if God did write it?




posted on Sep, 23 2008 @ 09:13 AM
link   
Ummm...I hate to be the one to break this to you, but the Bible was written by lots of different men - God had nothing to do with it. In fact, scholars now know that the New Testament Gospel of Mathew was written by at least 3 different people over an 120 year period. John was written over 80 years after the so-called death of Jesus...

So you see, the Bible is just like any other book....but did you know that for every time heaven is mentioned in the Bible - hell is mentioned 10 times that amount. What does that tell you about the authors?



posted on Sep, 23 2008 @ 12:59 PM
link   

Originally posted by imd12c4funn
Why is it that besides the Song of Solomon,
The only Book in the Bible that never mentions
God, Lord, or Jesus, is the Book of Esther?


Some canon lists did not include the book of Esther. For example, Athanasius states in his 39th Festal letter that it was not canonical, but should still be read. On the flip-side, Christ celebrated Purim (John 5) and also celebrated Hanukkah (John 10), which is from Maccabees. So, should Christians do as Christ did? Such is the argument.

Interestingly, the Old Testament canon is not actually closed across the Churches. In other words, the Protestants, Roman Catholics, Eastern Orthodox, and Non-Chalcedonian Churches do not agree on which are Old Testament books are canonical and which are not.

It is not a cut-and-dry issue.

There is an entire other thread about these issues here: Why books were left out of the bible? you might think about contributing there.



 
0

log in

join