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True and false/multiple choice tests should be abolished.

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posted on Sep, 20 2008 @ 05:09 PM
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I've been thinking for a long time about how true and false, or multiple choice tests, really don't do anyone any good. They get students in the mindset that what they are learning is true and indeed fact. They have to chose the right answers. When students get more right answers they get more points.

When you get more points than someone else it shows that you've done better than them. This creates the idea that somehow one student is smarter than another, because, they did better on a test.

I just think that this thinking of being right or wrong is harmful to children. They are young so they don't understand these things. If someone came up to them and proved to them that some true answer on a test was actually false how would they respond? Would they keep going believing their true answer was true?

If I told them I was going to tell them a true answer to the world's problems would they be able to find out what flaws are within my solution to the world's problems or would their "true/false" mindset get in the way of their thinking?

I think this true/false right/wrong mindset really affects the way that children talk. I think people shouldn't do these types of tests anymore.

What do you think?




posted on Sep, 21 2008 @ 04:52 AM
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There are so many issues to address in this post...


Originally posted by Frankidealist35
I've been thinking for a long time about how true and false, or multiple choice tests, really don't do anyone any good. They get students in the mindset that what they are learning is true and indeed fact.


If you believe that the "facts" taught in school are not actually factual, then you have a bone to pick with the educational curriculum, not T/F tests.


They have to chose the right answers. When students get more right answers they get more points.


That's how any and every test works. How else are teachers supposed to test and grade what students have learned? More points for incorrect answers? Or 100 points just for showing up? It's called merit and it's what grades are supposed to be based on.


When you get more points than someone else it shows that you've done better than them. This creates the idea that somehow one student is smarter than another, because, they did better on a test.


Again, this is called merit. Grades are supposed to be merit based, not self-esteem based. The reason public education is so godawful now is that the bar keeps being lowered in the name of self esteem. The entire class is held up by the lowest common denominator.

While you are correct that acing a test doesn't mean one child is smarter than another, it does mean that that child either was smart enough to pick up the material or spent time studying. Either way it means that that child has mastered the material and is ready to continue learning without needing remedial lessons. This is the very purpose of testing.


I just think that this thinking of being right or wrong is harmful to children. They are young so they don't understand these things.


The concept of right vs. wrong is a moral one. The concept of scoring well vs. poorly in academics is a factual one. These are two very different, unrelated things. Furthermore, the concept of merit brings out the best in people, young and old. It makes people strive because they want to do better. This idea of hurt feelings because of a bad grade is absolutely ridiculous. If a child doesn't want to feel sad they got an F, they should listen in class and learn the material! That's not hard to understand at all, even for a 1st grader.


If someone came up to them and proved to them that some true answer on a test was actually false how would they respond? Would they keep going believing their true answer was true?


Like what? What are you going to prove or disprove that is a question on a vocabulary quiz? That 9/11 was an inside job? That the Iraq War really was about oil? The questions on T/F tests are so simple that they only require a T/F answer. Names, dates, places, participants in events, vocabulary...this basic material isn't open to interpretation so a 'true' or 'false' answer will suffice.


I think this true/false right/wrong mindset really affects the way that children talk. I think people shouldn't do these types of tests anymore.


Teachers use T/F tests mainly when there is material that does not require discussion but still needs to be learned as the foundation for a subject. If there is a test on this material kids will be much more likely to learn it than if they are not tested on it. The easiet way for a teacher to get this test out of the way so they can get back to teaching is to make a test they can quickly grade with answers that are either right or wrong.

Honestly this entire thread seems half-baked. I think you could have easily come to these very common sensical conclusions yourself if you had only bothered to think for a few minutes before you clicked 'post'.

edited for quotes

[edit on 9/21/2008 by sc2099]



 
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