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Vulcan- the planet that never existed?

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posted on Sep, 19 2008 @ 05:21 PM
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Sorry for stealing the title


I'm guessing most of you have heard of Vulcan already. I'm not at 100% with this myth or whatever it's supposed to be though. I know this planet can't be proved since no one can find it anymore, and the last people who saw it died like a century ago.

Supposedly it was the 9th planet in the 19th century when Pluto wasn't discovered yet. One theory is that it crashed into the sun and disappeared.

Did it really exist though, or were all those austronauts on crack? If they were, I'd like some of itO_o I also want to be able to see a imaginary fire world when I look through a telescope!

[edit on 19-9-2008 by ZikhaN]




posted on Sep, 19 2008 @ 05:50 PM
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the only 'Vulcan' planet of long ago i recall is the exploded planet we know as the asteroid belt.

the 'EPH' = exploded planet hypothesis, is pretty much a cult following...
one which i subscribe to.

Now scientists say that the two types of asteroid materials found in the belt, are not compatible with an exploded planet as the source...
i still think that there was a watery world there near Mars,
& when Vulcan out-gassed, Mars surface got inundated...
and the Earth too was inundated by the biblical flood where the skies opened up in torrential rains.
(of course those flood of waters on the Earth were a long time before a 4,000BC as the bible account says.)

thanks



posted on Sep, 19 2008 @ 08:34 PM
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Originally posted by ZikhaN

Did it really exist though, or were all those austronauts on crack? If they were, I'd like some of itO_o I also want to be able to see a imaginary fire world when I look through a telescope!

[edit on 19-9-2008 by ZikhaN]


There were no astronauts at that time
Manned space exploration didnt even exist are you in any way saying astronomers and regarding the planet crashing into the sun wouldnt it have caused massive solar flares and gravitational disturbances if it had hit the sun.



posted on Sep, 20 2008 @ 03:09 AM
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Originally posted by peacejet

Originally posted by ZikhaN

Did it really exist though, or were all those austronauts on crack? If they were, I'd like some of itO_o I also want to be able to see a imaginary fire world when I look through a telescope!

[edit on 19-9-2008 by ZikhaN]


There were no astronauts at that time
Manned space exploration didnt even exist are you in any way saying astronomers and regarding the planet crashing into the sun wouldnt it have caused massive solar flares and gravitational disturbances if it had hit the sun.


W/e dude. Yes obviously I meant astronomers, small error, jesus.

You do know that Vulcanus was an extremely small planet right? It could have been just a very big asteroid or a planetoid. Maybe it had the exact same fate as the Shoemaker-Levy comet that passed too close to Jupiter (Inside the Roche limit), and shattered into 23 pieces. That comet had orbited Jupiter for atleast 20 years.

[edit on 20-9-2008 by ZikhaN]



posted on Sep, 20 2008 @ 07:22 AM
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Actually vulcan is the greek god of volcanoes and regarding the planets existence in the past, it might have existed in the past along with other planets and as you say shattered along with the other planets by the massive gravity of great jupe.



posted on Sep, 20 2008 @ 07:43 AM
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Wow you're impossible:O



posted on Sep, 21 2008 @ 06:06 AM
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Some informations about it:



On 26 March 1859, a new planet was seen.

It was seen by Edmond Lescarbault, a French medical doctor and amateur astronomer. He reported sighting a new planet in an orbit inside that of Mercury and he named it Vulcan.

Typical orbits for inner solar system asteroids


He had seen a round black spot on the Sun with a transit time across the solar disk 4 hours 30 minutes. He sent this information and his calculations on the planet's movements to Jean LeVerrier, France's most famous astronomer. Le Verrier had already noticed that Mercury had deviated from its orbit. A gravitational pull from Vulcan would fit in with what he was looking for.

However, it was not seen again and it is now believed to have been a rogue asteroid making a one-time pass close to the sun.

www.esa.int...


Vulcan, the intra-Mercurial planet, 1860-1916, 1971


The French mathematician Urbain Le Verrier, co-predictor with J.C. Adams of the position of Neptune before it was seen, in a lecture at 2 Jan 1860 announced that the problem of observed deviations of the motion of Mercury could be solved by assuming an intra-Mercurial planet, or possibly a second asteroid belt inside Mercury's orbit. The only possible way to observe this intra-Mercurial planet or asteroids was if/when they transited the Sun, or during total solar eclipses. Prof. Wolf at the Zurich sunspot data center, found a number of suspicious "dots" on the Sun, and another astronomer found some more. A total of two dozen spots seemed to fit the pattern of two intra-Mercurial orbits, one with a period of 26 days and the other of 38 days.

In 1859, Le Verrier received a letter from the amateur astronomer Lescarbault, who reported having seen a round black spot on the Sun on March 26 1859, looking like a planet transiting the Sun. He had seen the spot one hour and a quarter, when it moved a quarter of the solar diameter. Lescarbault estimated the orbital inclination to between 5.3 and 7.3 degrees, its longitude of node about 183 deg, its eccentricity "enormous", and its transit time across the solar disk 4 hours 30 minutes. Le Verrier investigated this observation, and computed an orbit from it: period 19 days 7 hours, mean distance from Sun 0.1427 a.u., inclination 12# 10', ascending node at 12# 59' The diameter was considerably smaller than Mercury's and its mass was estimated at 1/17 of Mercury's mass. This was too small to account for the deviations of Mercury's orbit, but perhaps this was the largest member of that intra-Mercurial asteroid belt? Le Verrier fell in love with the planet, and named it Vulcan.

In 1860 there was a total eclipse of the Sun. Le Verrier mobilized all French and some other astronomers to find Vulcan - nobody did. Wolf's suspicious 'sunspots' now revived Le Verrier's interest, and just before Le Verrier's death in 1877 some more 'evidence' found its way into print. On April 4 1875, a German astronomer, H. Weber, saw a round spot on the Sun. Le Verrier's orbit indicated a possible transit at April 3 that year, and Wolf noticed that his 38-day orbit also could have performed a transit at about that time. That 'round dot' was also photographed at Greenwich and in Madrid.


Source and full article: NinePlanets.org




From the article: Information Exchange on Newtonian gravity and Einstein's Theory of General Relativity (.PDF)



4a: Mercury's orbit

All planets orbit the Sun in an oval, as described by Kepler's Laws, so there is a point in that orbit that is closest to the Sun, called the perihelion.
We observe that as Mercury orbits the Sun, the perihelion advances by a small amount.
Newton's theory does not fully explain this precession of Mercury's perihelion.
There is a 43 arcsecond per century discrepancy between the Newtonian prediction (resulting from the gravitational tugs of the other planets) and the observed precession.

cosmictimes.gsfc.nasa.gov...





4b: How Newton's gravity explains Mercury's orbit

Newton's theory of universal gravitation has had wonderful
success in explaining the motions of the planets in our Solar System, even leading to the discovery of Neptune. However, given the known planets in our Solar System, Newton's theory does not fully explain the precession of
Mercury's orbit.
Some astronomers theorize that another planet, inside the orbit of Mercury, could account for the odd behavior of Mercury.
This position is bolstered by the success in finding Neptune using the perturbations of Uranus' orbit to calculate an orbit of the
undiscovered planet.
The proposed planet between the Sun and Mercury has been named Vulcan, but has yet to be observed.

cosmictimes.gsfc.nasa.gov...

Wikipedia entry


The Planet That Wasn't
By Isaac Asimov

Littell's Living Age/Volume 131/Issue 1690/The Planet Vulcan

Amazon:
In Search Of Planet Vulcan
By Richard Baum




[edit on 21/9/2008 by internos]



posted on Sep, 22 2008 @ 03:34 AM
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The slow precession of Mercury's orbit is fully accounted for by Einstein's theory of relativity. Lescarbault was probably just smoking something dodgy at the time.



posted on Sep, 22 2008 @ 05:28 AM
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Yes, the perihelion precession of Mercury's orbit was one of the classic tests of general relativity. It had been a problem in classical mechanics until 1916.

Tests of General Relativity




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