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NASA to Discuss Conditions on and Surrounding the Sun

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posted on Sep, 21 2008 @ 06:50 PM
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reply to post by roguetechie
 


The problem is we don't care enough.
People and science don't have enough reasons, or so we all believe, for pushing for a massive space initiative. For me this is the epitome of conformity, of a totally relaxed society while facing a myriad of immediate social and environmental dangers. Maybe we just don't have what it takes for developing a spacefairing civilization. Most people would feel more comfortable with the idea of the human population to be reduced to its 1/12th and for the human society to revert back to its hunter gatherer status, instead of pushing forward conquering new realms in to the unknown universe.

Sometimes I ponder of these things and I also research about ufological subjects, my favorite for the time being is this:
A Biological guide to Extraterrestrials
It seems more than one species look like funny creatures, you wouldn't give some special attention if it happened to be just a part of our fauna. Yet these are supposedly creatures from spacefairing civilizations that have mastered space flight. Or so the witnesses reports say, and I don't have reasons enough for not believing them. We would look down on some of those if we happened to meet some of them as a part of our earthly fauna if we didn't know better.

I guess.. we might be the "funny" creatures after all.


Stagnation is what will kill us in the end, though I doubt that a massive gamma ray burst from a human made device would be the reason, since I also doubt we could reach such technological levels any time soon since the way things are going it seems we are slowly progressing to a halt.
Not a legacy any society should be proud of.

[edited for more content]

Sorry for taking the thread of topic.


[edit on 21-9-2008 by spacebot]




posted on Sep, 21 2008 @ 06:58 PM
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Originally posted by JaxonRoberts
reply to post by Cyberbian
 


I was answering your question, not trying to validate the statement. But since you insist... It is completely ignorant, astrophysically speaking, to state that "unless we're getting sucked into it" that the super-massive (astronomers an astrophysists words for it, not mine) black hole in the center of our universe, which keeps stars in orbit around it from a distance of 100,000 light years, can not have any effect on our solar system, which is only 26,000 light years from the core. It seems ludicrous to think that news about the lack of solar winds would not include possible explanations as to why! But apparently, you have all the answers to everything, so we just might as well shut this site down, as well as the rest of the internet, and just have a blog that you write, oh wise one! If you're wonder where this came from, it's your attitude to open discussion, which is more than apparent from your posts!


Wow, that all those sour grapes, you must turn out quite a bit of whine.

Do you always resort to personal attack when you find yourself unarmed in a war of wits?



posted on Sep, 21 2008 @ 07:09 PM
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reply to post by Cyberbian
 


It is apparent from your posts, which perhaps you should review, that you are the one bringing a knife to a gun fight.

[edit on 21-9-2008 by JaxonRoberts]



posted on Sep, 21 2008 @ 08:53 PM
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Sometimes ATS reminds me of the adage "If you are too open minded, your brain will fall out."

Only on ATS does a thread about a non speculatory article telling of a news conference for new data collected about the sun turn into a battle of wits, religion, global warming, ice ages, aliens, galactic alignment, black holes, electric universe, etc...

It's as if the mods are completely arbitrary in their judgment of off-topic posts.

Back on topic... (?)

So, I was watching my grass grow the other day, and noticed some odd looking bugs. Does anyone think they are a new species that spontaneously evolved due to the decrease in solar winds?????? Maybe they are aliens, because I've never seen them before!!!




posted on Sep, 21 2008 @ 09:15 PM
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What causes an ice age is fascinating. It seems that when the sun has sunspots, solar wind speeds up and increases. This blocks a lot of the cosmic rays hitting the earth and increases the Earths magnetic protection. Also the flares and sunspot activity add to atmospheric tempature increases from the solar interaction. When there are no sunspots, the cosmic rays start to bombard the Earth. What happens next is interesting. The cosmic rays cause cloud formatiom and this decreases the amount of sunlight reaching the earth's surface. The oceans begin to cool and then the global tempature cools.

What is even more fascinating is, the earth has been heating up because of the excess in sunspot activity in recent decades. The Earth has melted a lot of ice, and this is in the atmosphere. Now last winter was the snowiest in 138 years. Yet, even though the global tempature was down since 2001 and at a five year low, it was still higher than in the 70's and 80's. With each year getting colder, the moisture will be ever squeezed from the air and the winters will be colder and longer. It will not take many years to be in a full blown ice age.

To date there have been only a handful of old cycle sunspots only lasting hours, and no new cycle ones. If you look closely at the chart someone posted before me, you will see that the current data has already cut into the predicted cycle marked in red.

get your coats on... it's going to get cold... very cold indeed.



posted on Sep, 22 2008 @ 01:11 AM
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Dan Bursh talks about this on his website: eaglesdisobey.net...



posted on Sep, 23 2008 @ 08:32 AM
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Originally posted by Fromabove
What causes an ice age is fascinating. It seems that when the sun has sunspots, solar wind speeds up and increases. This blocks a lot of the cosmic rays hitting the earth and increases the Earths magnetic protection. Also the flares and sunspot activity add to atmospheric tempature increases from the solar interaction. When there are no sunspots, the cosmic rays start to bombard the Earth. What happens next is interesting. The cosmic rays cause cloud formatiom and this decreases the amount of sunlight reaching the earth's surface. The oceans begin to cool and then the global tempature cools.

What is even more fascinating is, the earth has been heating up because of the excess in sunspot activity in recent decades. The Earth has melted a lot of ice, and this is in the atmosphere. Now last winter was the snowiest in 138 years. Yet, even though the global tempature was down since 2001 and at a five year low, it was still higher than in the 70's and 80's. With each year getting colder, the moisture will be ever squeezed from the air and the winters will be colder and longer. It will not take many years to be in a full blown ice age.

To date there have been only a handful of old cycle sunspots only lasting hours, and no new cycle ones. If you look closely at the chart someone posted before me, you will see that the current data has already cut into the predicted cycle marked in red.

get your coats on... it's going to get cold... very cold indeed.




where are you that you had the snowiest winter in 138 years?.? because where i live, we had less than average...now this year there are predictions of it being an extremely harsh winter, especially given the extremely mild summer we had...but meh...to OP topic...can't wait to find out what the announcement is...



posted on Sep, 23 2008 @ 08:45 AM
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...press conference scheduled for 12:30pm e.s.t. today... article relating to current discussion about potential cooling period from lack of sun spots:


Sorokhtin believes that a lack of sunspots does indicate a coming cooling period based on certain past trends and early records. In fact, he calls manmade climate change "a drop in the bucket" compared to the fierce and abrupt cold that can potentially be brought on by inactive solar phases.


www.dailygalaxy.com...

This February is the last report from NASA regarding ULYSSES spacecraft:


The spacecraft is powered by the decay of a radioactive isotope. Over its 17-plus years, the power has been steadily dropping. The spacecraft no longer can run all of its communications, heating and scientific equipment simultaneously. "We expect certain parts of the spacecraft to reach 2 degrees Celsius pretty soon," said Richard Marsden, ESA project scientist and mission manager. This temperature drop will block the fuel pipes, making the spacecraft impossible to maneuver.


www.jpl.nasa.gov...

[edit on 23-9-2008 by arktkchr]



posted on Sep, 23 2008 @ 12:34 PM
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So what did they say?
I couldn't get the live stream to work.



posted on Sep, 23 2008 @ 12:41 PM
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Ulysses Reveals Global Solar Wind Plasma Output at 50-Year Low - PASADENA, Calif. -- Data from the Ulysses spacecraft, a joint NASA-European Space Agency mission, show the sun has reduced its output of solar wind to the lowest levels since accurate readings became available. The sun's current state could reduce the natural shielding that envelops our solar system.



"The sun's million mile-per-hour solar wind inflates a protective bubble, or heliosphere, around the solar system. It influences how things work here on Earth and even out at the boundary of our solar system where it meets the galaxy," said Dave McComas, Ulysses' solar wind instrument principal investigator and senior executive director at the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. "Ulysses data indicate the solar wind's global pressure is the lowest we have seen since the beginning of the space age."



The sun's solar wind plasma is a stream of charged particles ejected from the sun's upper atmosphere. The solar wind interacts with every planet in our solar system. It also defines the border between our solar system and interstellar space.

This border, called the heliopause, surrounds our solar system where the solar wind's strength is no longer great enough to push back the wind of other stars. The region around the heliopause also acts as a shield for our solar system, warding off a significant portion of the cosmic rays outside the galaxy.



"Galactic cosmic rays carry with them radiation from other parts of our galaxy," said Ed Smith, NASA's Ulysses project scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. "With the solar wind at an all-time low, there is an excellent chance the heliosphere will diminish in size and strength. If that occurs, more galactic cosmic rays will make it into the inner part of our solar system."

Galactic cosmic rays are of great interest to NASA. Cosmic rays are linked to engineering decisions for unmanned interplanetary spacecraft and exposure limits for astronauts traveling beyond low-Earth orbit.



In 2007, Ulysses made its third rapid scan of the solar wind and magnetic field from the sun's south to north pole. When the results were compared with observations from the previous solar cycle, the strength of the solar wind pressure and the magnetic field embedded in the solar wind were found to have decreased by 20 percent. The field strength near the spacecraft has decreased by 36 percent.

"The sun cycles between periods of great activity and lesser activity," Smith said. "Right now, we are in a period of minimal activity that has stretched on longer than anyone anticipated."


www.jpl.nasa.gov...

"Related images" page:

www.nasa.gov...

[edit on 23-9-2008 by arktkchr]



posted on Sep, 23 2008 @ 02:41 PM
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so basically they restated everything that has already been said? how kind of NASA... oh well looks like the sun will keep on sun-ning for a while



posted on Sep, 23 2008 @ 02:47 PM
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reply to post by cebadec
 


Yeah, for another 5 billion years or so!


But what effects, if any, is the current lull going to have on us? It does seem to support those who say global warming is not man made. Oh crap, I just agreed with Sarah Palin! Somebody shoot me, please!!!!



posted on Sep, 23 2008 @ 02:48 PM
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What makes me think they're going to present a bill for $500 billion.. and release a press statement..


It's hot... It's very,very hot.





posted on Sep, 23 2008 @ 03:11 PM
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So is this the new excuse they will now have to cancel all the new moon missions planned, excess galactic radiation, so we stop our inquiries over what has already been taken from us at tax payers expense: the TRUTH!



posted on Sep, 23 2008 @ 03:24 PM
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Was it me or did I hear one of the NASA representatives whisper:

"Prepare for Unforeseen Consequences"




posted on Sep, 23 2008 @ 03:32 PM
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Originally posted by TruthMagnet
Was it me or did I hear one of the NASA representatives whisper:

"Prepare for Unforeseen Consequences"



Seriously???



posted on Sep, 23 2008 @ 03:32 PM
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reply to post by mystiq
 


Star for you! When I reached the little blurb about astronaut exposure to these increasing particles, the first thought I had was "OK, they'll manufacture this into their excuse for not having a new shuttle for quite some time & shelving our manned space flight program for that duration."



posted on Sep, 23 2008 @ 06:08 PM
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...more references:


The solar wind's effects are also felt at the edge of the solar system, where the Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 probes have entered the heliosphere's outer envelope layer. Voyager 2 arrived at the solar system edge later than Voyager 1, yet found that that boundary to be almost a billion miles closer – a possible sign of the shrinking protective bubble.



"For the first time we've got a spacecraft that flies over the poles of the sun," said Ed Smith, a Ulysses scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. "That allows us to see changes in the heliosphere in three dimensions, or four if you count time."

At least one lingering question still stands out — whether the current weak solar winds represent an isolated phase or a longer term trend in future solar cycles.



Typically a solar minimum lasts about a year, but this low point has gone on since the summer of 2006.


ap.google.com...
www.space.com...

[edit on 23-9-2008 by arktkchr]



posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 04:59 PM
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Could the conditions of the sun they are talking about be apart of what is currently going on?

Check out my thread here and the latest info I've discovered is on pg18/19...
Here

Could they have intentionally nuked the farside of the sun and we have something like a CME heading outwards?

Please take a look and see if NASA maybe knew something and they have planned this. All indications are that this is true...

Rgds


[edit on 18-2-2009 by AllTiedTogether]



posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 05:02 PM
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reply to post by AllTiedTogether
 


The earth compared to the sun is a dot. A nuke compared to the earth is a dot. So I don't think a nuke would have any effect on the sun


I've been looking at the sunspot cycle and I find it strange that it hasn't picked up yet. It's been a mild concern of mine for about a year or so because I remember reading that it should have started awhile ago, but who knows. Its supposed to peak in 2011/2012 so it really doesnt give it that much time to rev up.

[edit on 18-2-2009 by ghaleon12]




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