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Hard Times Have Tent Cities Rising Across the Country

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posted on Sep, 18 2008 @ 08:22 PM
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Hard Times Have Tent Cities Rising Across the Country


www.foxnews.com

RENO, Nev. — A few tents cropped up hard by the railroad tracks, pitched by men left with nowhere to go once the emergency winter shelter closed for the summer.

Then others appeared — people who had lost their jobs to the ailing economy, or newcomers who had moved to Reno for work and discovered no one was hiring.

Within weeks, more than 150 people were living in tents big and small, barely a foot apart in a patch of dirt slated to be a parking lot for a campus of shelters Reno is buildin
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Sep, 18 2008 @ 08:22 PM
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When I saw this headlines I couldn't believe that they were talking about here in the U.S., I guess that the predictions that the U.S. could become a thirl world country that seem laughable a couple of years ago doesn't look that wack all of the sudden.

Goob job Dublya!

www.foxnews.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Sep, 18 2008 @ 08:27 PM
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I tell you, news about the homeless in tend cities has been coming on and off in the last year since the housing crisis started but as usual you may no find a lot of information on it.

But they are there and is getting bigger.



posted on Sep, 18 2008 @ 08:56 PM
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Bad situation? Yes. Unheard of? Not at all.
Every state has a populace percentage that live under bridges and in cardboard boxes. The homeless situation in America has always been a part of reality. Mostly though, it is like a dirty little secret that the MSM doesnt give much attention to because it is so common place. Citizens from all ranks of the class system know about the homeless situation and most choose to ignore it.
Ok, so a new crop of homeless people come along due to the recent financial woes and all of a sudden it means crisis. I have to disagree with you there. There will always be a margin of homelessness in the US.
Even in the greatest, most powerful and richest days of the US, there were homeless people who were completely ignored. The government and charity organizations largely choose to spend their time and money in foreign countries because it garners the most attention, increasing donations, thereby growing the entity. No one cares about truly supporting those organizations that help the daily local heroes, because it isnt popular or sexy. These smaller charitable entities rely mostly on tax breaks and donations from individuals and small businesses to survive. While national/international organizations value themselves in the hundreds of millions, the smaller, just as important organizations value themselves in the hundreds of thousands. Huge difference in view, value and ability to aid.

At least those in NV have tents, unlike the cardboard box and sewer rats that live in many other cities.

Note: I didnt intend this to sound crass, rather realistic. I know that if I were in that situation, I would want some media coverage in hopes that I could get back to normal. And I truly do hope that these people can find some way back to their lives. It is evidence of the fact that there are far too many people in this country that are just one bad month away from homelessness and bread lines.



posted on Sep, 18 2008 @ 09:10 PM
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reply to post by wheresthetruth
 


I agree, BUT when you get an influx of previous 9-5 workers who had a home and have a family pitching tents, its a bit different to a homeless person.

What is happening now, is not just a common cycle.



posted on Sep, 18 2008 @ 09:17 PM
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reply to post by wheresthetruth
 


I agree with what you say, but what surprise me is the new class of homeless people if you can call it such. The economy being all bad and everything is nothing new, but people suffering homelessness because of it thats a new development for me.

When I think of a homeless person I think maybe of the person that has some sort of disability either physical or mental, a drug dependency, people that just dont care and have gone through life making bad decision after bad decision.

I just dont think of people that find themselves homeless because of the bad economic policies enacted by the government that is supposed to create jobs and foster economic growth.



posted on Sep, 18 2008 @ 09:26 PM
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Reno has been that way for many years. I lived there briefly in the 80's. Many of the Casino Workers would sleep in the parks in the day and work at night because rent was so high they wanted to save their money.

The shelters are packed with people who go there to gamble and loose everything, leaving them with no where to go and no money to get there. Many of these people are gambling addicts and like those addicted to alcohol and drugs, they end up homeless.

Then you also have those who they call Missionites. They come to places like Reno and Vegas where there are shelters and rescue missions to get away from colder climates. Reno being on the freeway it is attracts many of them.

Many of these people fall into the category of the mentally ill. They wander the country unsupervised, surviving however they can, because they are not ill enough to be put into an institution and their families either don't exist or they don't want them around.

Unemployment is still at a historically low rate and you will find that these are mostly people who would not take a job if offered. Our society, like all others around the world, is full of people who will not work. Most people simply go to their families or freinds when they fall on hard times. These folks often have no place else to go because they burn their bridges behind them.



posted on Sep, 18 2008 @ 09:31 PM
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One thing to also consider is that rent has doubled or tripled in many areas in the last few years, due to the bubble. In a way some of these folks caused their own problem by purchasing houses they could not afford and getting into such trouble financially they can't even cover rent.

I blame that one on the Banks for letting people take out variable rate mortgages who clearly did not understand the papers they were signing.



posted on Sep, 19 2008 @ 01:04 AM
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reply to post by Blaine91555
 


It's becoming more and more like Steinbeck's "The Grapes of Wrath". Many folks want to help but are in meager means themselves, but I offer up that there is something we can do all beit small (for those of us in the lower status ranks). When you shop, you can spend just $20 extra maybe on a few items...maybe a few gallons of milk and some plastic cups...or maybe a box of items such as mixed fruits & veggies or even a few bags of chips. I know if I were homeless and haveing a tough time I would really enjoy a bag of pototo chips once in a while.

While it may not fix their situation, it will demonstrate that there are those in the community who do care and are willing to acknowledge the plight and offer something. In the winter maybe a box of donuts and a cantein of hot coffee?

We may be seeing a lot more of these cities this year and next...who knows you or I could end up in one?



posted on Sep, 19 2008 @ 01:24 AM
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I always give the bums money if I can. I know they more than likely will go and get a jug or bump with the money I give them. They are in pain and there but for the grace of God go I.



posted on Sep, 19 2008 @ 01:34 AM
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reply to post by skyshow
 


Give a man a fish and he eats for one meal, teach a man to fish and he eats for a lifetime. Like Blaine said, many of these people refuse jobs offered to them (I speak from the experience of someone who has offered some of them jobs purely as a social experiment to see if they would take the offer...) Usually they stare at you as if you'd just slapped their face and called their mother a whore until you walk away. I'm not talking about shady job offers, either, I'm saying from personal experience you say to one of these panhandlers or sign holders "I have a truckload of cordwood that needs split and stacked up. Couple hours of good work for $50." and they refuse. I'm fairly well off, strictly middle class guy with a good job, and I can tell you right now if somebody offered me &50 to split and stack wood on a Saturday or Sunday morning, I'd be on their doorstep before the sun was up.

Anyway, as to the OP, I keep hearing about this new homeless situation, yet I am failing to see any great abundance of new homeless people. What happened to the report earlier in the year about how we weren't seeing as many homeless because they were squatting in the abandoned, foreclosed houses everywhere? I've yet to see any news articles or hear any reports of a dramatic upswing in law enforcement kicking them out of these abandoned homes (actually, I've yet to hear more than one or two reports that even claimed they were squatting in the homes to begin with...) This is typical media propaganda to me. They're taking something which happens every single year, with very little fluctuation in the overall percentage of Americans who live in "tent cities" and they're trying to say this year it's different and worse because of the economy.

I don't buy it. It's a combination of elevated crackdowns against illegal camping on city owned lands pushing what homeless they are onto the ever dwindling tracts of land available for them to camp out on and seasonal fluctuations in what part of the country the experienced homeless tend to summer or winter in.



posted on Sep, 19 2008 @ 11:04 AM
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reply to post by burdman30ott6
 





Anyway, as to the OP, I keep hearing about this new homeless situation, yet I am failing to see any great abundance of new homeless people.


It's good to see that you and others take some genuine heart felt interest in this issue. Tent cities are not just filled with those who stand out by the freeway exit with a cardboard sign in their hands. Many are newly homeless having been evicted. Many are now living in their cars, but it's often difficult to find them in or nearby the gated communities. Just because you don't see them doesn't mean they don't exist.

You could probably locate them by getting out the phone book and digging around for one of many community outreach agencies, or contact an information line and ask somene. If that fails you can always contact the sociology dpt, or the office for the nearest MSW program at your local University. There are plenty of folks who work in the field who would love to hear from you to get your help teaching folks how to fish. All you have to do is to pick up the phone!

The facts are people fall through the cracks. Some like it there, sure, but it's a misnomer to lump all in the same boat and put everyone down for a few people's sloth, and even then most likely it can be attributed to an untreated mental disorder and/or health condition.



[edit on 19-9-2008 by skyshow]



posted on Sep, 19 2008 @ 11:16 AM
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i read about the tent citys a few months ago, and seen it on bbc news (it has been reported on a few times in the uk)

its crazy, the us government can dish out near a trillion to companys to stop them going bust (and the debts being written off) , yet they cant help their homeless??

im fairly sure even 1 % of that would house all the USA's homeless and give them some soup and a blanket!

its a pretty damming comment on what the world is becoming on the whole!



posted on Sep, 19 2008 @ 12:05 PM
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I'd like to invite all of you to read this thread to gain a bit more insight into the world of homelessness.

Anyway, homelessness is only a problem for those who are forced into it. If we are indeed seeing a rise in that kind of homelessness, of course it is a problem. It's still very unclear if there is such a growth in the homeless population. If there indeed is it follows logically that the economy is mostly to blame. It would not surprise me if we started seeing Bushvilles (just doesn't have the same ring as Hoovervilles), but we just don't know yet.



posted on Sep, 19 2008 @ 12:33 PM
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www.youtube.com...


click the link to see tent cities outside LA

[edit on 19-9-2008 by whaaa]


SR

posted on Sep, 19 2008 @ 12:41 PM
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People laugh but i'm studying something like this for my dissertation and sustainable communities, Some of the rates the human race has been projected at mass tent cities could very well be the norm in a century or more for a mass of the worlds populace.



posted on Sep, 19 2008 @ 12:52 PM
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reply to post by marg6043
 


tis true:
December 07
www.abovetopsecret.com...
March 08
www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Sep, 19 2008 @ 12:58 PM
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reply to post by Crakeur
 


Wow!

Is there any particular reason why the British TV news media is reporting on this but not the MSM here in the States?



posted on Sep, 19 2008 @ 01:34 PM
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I guess that no one remembers the 1980s, when there was an exodus of homeless that were living on the streets and under bridges all over the southwest U.S. I worked as a newspaper contractor in Dallas during this period and can tell you that there were people sleeping all over the place. A friend of mine that I met in Vietnam and is now a college professor had to live under a bridge during that period. I was close to being one of these people myself, and was mistaken for one often while walking through the banks and office buildings after making deliveries. It was kind of funny being in elevators full of men in suits doing the best they could to stand as far as they could from me while I was gagging on the stench of their expensive cologne.



posted on Sep, 19 2008 @ 02:03 PM
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reply to post by Blaine91555
 




One thing to also consider is that rent has doubled or tripled in many areas in the last few years, due to the bubble. In a way some of these folks caused their own problem by purchasing houses they could not afford and getting into such trouble financially they can't even cover rent.

I blame that one on the Banks for letting people take out variable rate mortgages who clearly did not understand the papers they were signing.

This explanation leaves out the people like my friend who just had to move because they raised his rent $600 a month?!?!? He was doing OK, slightly struggling w/ $1000 rent. $1600......pretty much unattainable. I don't see massive inflation being his fault.




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