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Pharmaceutical Industry Manipulating Doctors for Profits

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posted on Sep, 15 2008 @ 04:36 PM
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Medical schools, journals fight industry influence



Just about every segment of the medical community is piling on the pharmaceutical industry these days, accusing drugmakers of deceiving the public, manipulating doctors and putting profits before patients.

"The influence that the pharmaceutical companies, the for-profits, are having on every aspect of medicine ... is so blatant now you'd have to be deaf, blind and dumb not to see it," said Journal of the American Medical Association editor Dr. Catherine DeAngelis, a longtime industry critic. "We have just allowed them to take over, and it's our fault, the whole medical community."

"We should all get together and say, 'Enough!'" DeAngelis said.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


Amen! I'll say it with you. I've had enough of the pharmaceutical companies having such an extensive enfluence on the medical industry.



...pharmaceutical analyst Steve Brozak of WBB Securities said drugmakers will find ways to adapt to new rules.

"The earlier you can hook one of these doctors, the more loyal they are" to a brand, Brozak said.

"You're not being bribed, you're being gifted," doctors may think, but industry freebies influence prescribing patterns, Rothman said.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


Is Med School early enough? Well, that's where it all starts. How can institutions allow such bribery and cheap marketing tactics. It's definitely not right. We need more schools stepping up and doing the right thing, like Stanford Med School.



Last month, the Medical School banned doctors in its hospitals and clinics from accepting gifts — ranging from sticky notes to catered luncheons and information sessions — from drug company representatives......

“Even small gifts can alter a doctor’s drug-prescribing decisions and other recommendations she or he may exercise,” he said. “The very fact that the pharmaceutical industry spends over $20 billion per annum on such gifts and meals, most targeted at doctors, is evidence that this marketing strategy must be working.” Dean Philip Pizzo


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


But it doesn't stop at freebies and free lunches. You can't finish med school? Thats alright, the drugmakers got your back. That's right guys. Drug companies helping to continue the education of young doctors by paying for their schooling. Something must be done to stop this.



Rothman said there's a new effort to "clean up" continuing medical education of doctors, the only professionals he knows who don't pay for it themselves.

In June, the Association of American Medical Colleges put out guidelines that bar drugmakers from paying for continuing medical education sessions on specific topics but allow donations to a central fund.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


Please tell me that you guys see the same thing I'm seeing here. How about spending that $20 Billion on drug testing and research instead of bribery? Put that money towards the patient's safety instead instead of using it as an investment. There is just too much of this, "You take care of us and we'll take care of you.
"


-Dev

[edit on 15-9-2008 by DevolutionEvolvd]




posted on Sep, 15 2008 @ 05:04 PM
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You ask why not spend that money on further R&D.
I would prefer it be spent on bringing down prices.



posted on Sep, 16 2008 @ 12:19 AM
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I saw a shrink once (big surprise I know) and noticed the doctor's pen had "zoloft" printed on it. I found myself wondering what other gifts he'd recieved..

Looking back.. advertising to patients during sessions..? that is so tacky.



posted on Sep, 16 2008 @ 01:34 PM
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Stanford is not the only hospital but it has really set the standard for this stuff. When you walk throught the facility there are none of the pads, pens and other promotional junk you usually see. When we do transports to other facilities its amazing how much stuff is given out.

They are now starting to target Nurse Practioners and RN's



posted on Sep, 16 2008 @ 02:10 PM
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My step-mom is an RN and is back in school now to be a Nurse Practitioner. I hear about it all the time. FredT, You're right, They are targeting her.

When I think about the hand that Pharma has in all of this it almost makes me sick. Actually, it just really pisses me off. Too the point that it becomes hard to really think about the point I'm trying to make. Like right now.



posted on Sep, 16 2008 @ 02:17 PM
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reply to post by LAUGHING-CAT
 


Really? Spending money on reducing the price of pharmaceuticals?


There are ways to reduce cost. That's not one of them.

Besides, would really rather pay pennies on the dollar for a drug that could possibly kill you before your diagnosed ailment does, or would you rather pay the same amount on a drug that has been adequately tested?



posted on Sep, 16 2008 @ 02:32 PM
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reply to post by FredT
 


The advertising.

It's invasive to the whole health care experience.

So innocuous a thing, yet so succint.

The pen.
I'm watching the pen as she writes notes from our session.
On the pad. The pad that reinforces the meme.

What is written on that pad that will soon affect my life.

The room is quiet and the only think moving is the pen.
For some reason I have to look at the advertising.
I have to. No choice. It's an uncomfortable silence.


Talk about dehumanizing!






[edit on 9/16/08 by GENERAL EYES]



posted on Sep, 16 2008 @ 02:38 PM
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reply to post by GENERAL EYES
 


Yeah that is really bad form IMHO. The pens and pads are the tip of the iceberg. The junkets these guys used to go on were amazing. 10 minutes about the drug and a week being toured around Tahiti



posted on Sep, 16 2008 @ 02:54 PM
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Wow, way to put that into perspective.


Reading that sent chills down my spine. In retrospect, I wasn't really addressing the "advertising to the patient" issue.
Dehumanizing indeed.

Thanks for that post. Got me thinkin' again!



posted on Sep, 16 2008 @ 02:58 PM
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reply to post by DevolutionEvolvd
 


Advertising ot the patient has been going on for ages. Look at all of the perscription drugs being pitched directly via TV adn the like.



posted on Sep, 16 2008 @ 03:09 PM
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I've seen a similar circumstance involving a friend in Pharmacy school. As far as I've ever hear, pharmacists are there to fill prescriptions and give advise about specific medication. So at first I didn't see the point of the pharmaceutical industry taking extreme attention in this group of students. That was until I was advised of a new and upcoming change that we will more than likely see (especially with the pharma industry running with it like it's already in place).

I was told pharmacists are to have broader responsibilities in that they may soon be able to choose the specific "flavour" of medication from that prescribed by the doctor. The idea is that pharmacists are a lot more familiar with drugs than the average doctor so they may be given the power to choose final sale, supposedly tailored to the customer's needs. (This would be brand and such specific not change the overall prescription)

If this is indeed the case it would explain why my soon to be pharmacist friend and peers were inundated by industry offerings on several occasions. To the point of it being semi-disturbing to the students I was told.

In any event, I'm aware of Big Pharma and conglomerates' far reaching influences. These are some of the oldest and biggest companies in the world. I always consider this when I'm thinking about Big Pharma





posted on Sep, 16 2008 @ 03:27 PM
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FredT, I'm aware of the TV ads. That gets to me too. It takes the prescribing/diagnosis power away from the doctor, essentially. Now you have patients telling there doctors what medications are best for them.


How many doctors actually turn down a patient when they demand a certain drug?

What ever happened to visiting the doctor so he can properly diagnose the problem and, patient willing, prescribe the most suitable drug?



posted on Sep, 16 2008 @ 03:27 PM
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All those things exist. And more often then some might think. But it is important to remember that it is an industry. Industry that wants to make profit, and it is exactly what it does. By the way, not always it is the doctors who "want" to push prescriptions. There are a lot of cases where people demand to receive drug that they heard/read/think will work better then proposed treatment. Commercials could be not direct. So it is important that even regular non-involved person should be aware that there are all kinds of influences involved in decision-making process in medical approach to his situation, mainly his health, but not only that.
Vast majority of doctors/nurses/pharmacists will not intentionally give less effective/more costly treatment even if pens or even as far as weekends (disguised as seminars) are involved. Simply people should be aware that it is industry, it needs to be profitable and it is just as cold in seeking this profit as car industry. Not always newer ,more promoted and especially much more expensive drugs are better then older ones. Not all information in mass media concerning medicine is reliable . Not always there is need to take "fashion" drugs - like SSRI/methylphenidate/sildenafil epidemics. Drugs are poisons in low dosages and should be taken only when needed. Doctors know the most about that and their decision should matter, not that of the neighbor. Vast majority of Doctors are decent people.
Just always keep in mind that it is an industry.



posted on Sep, 16 2008 @ 03:36 PM
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reply to post by DevolutionEvolvd
 


There is a line in the TV show Scrubs that really rings true:

"Today people think of us as drug-dispensing walking lawsuits who are, in fact, less informed than their internet phones.
"

Its really true and people on the basis of a TV add make and push for medical decisions



posted on Sep, 16 2008 @ 03:43 PM
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reply to post by DevolutionEvolvd
 


Yea that's pretty sad. My friend went to American Career College to be a nurse, she should have owed 25 thousand dollars in loans. She finished 2 nursing programs, all the way up to LVN. I asked her if she owed a ton of money, she only owed 1,000 dollars because of some special program, also she has a kid, and had been on welfare since she had her child. I wonder if these are reasons that they use to help people decrease their loans.



posted on Sep, 16 2008 @ 04:48 PM
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I think most doctors are decent people. I'm seriously considering becoming one myself, so no hate from this end. Please understand that this thread was in no way directed at doctors, but at the pharmaceutical industry.


Originally posted by ZeroKnowledge
But it is important to remember that it is an industry. Industry that wants to make profit, and it is exactly what it does........

Simply people should be aware that it is industry, it needs to be profitable and it is just as cold in seeking this profit as car industry.......

Just always keep in mind that it is an industry.


Oh no! I'm sorry but, Chevy, trying to convince me to buy their new, high gas mileage, 4-door truck, is nowhere near as cold as a drug companie's small efforts in drug research compared to multi-billion dollar advertising efforts.
To what extent do we let an industry push to make a profit? At what point can we, the very people that are adversely affected by this profiteering, step in and establish a few regulations to protect ourselves?



Vast majority of doctors/nurses/pharmacists will not intentionally give less effective/more costly treatment even if pens or even as far as weekends (disguised as seminars) are involved.


Right. Keyword there. Intentionally. I'll reiterate, this is not a shot at doctors. Advertising is not necessarily about convincing you. Even if you aren't listening, your subconscious is.



Not all information in mass media concerning medicine is reliable .


Who gets their information from the mass media? ATS all the way baby!


-Dev





[edit on 16-9-2008 by DevolutionEvolvd]



posted on Mar, 30 2009 @ 05:28 PM
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Harvard Medical Students Rebel Against Pharma-Ties
Tuesday, 03 March 2009
200 Harvard Medical School STUDENTS are confronting the administration demanding an end to pharmaceutical industry influence in the classroom.

A front page report in the Business section of the New York Times should bestir some of Harvard Medical School alumni. 200 Harvard Medical School STUDENTS are confronting the administration demanding an end to pharmaceutical industry influence in the classroom.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.

www.ahrp.org...


I love hearing this straight from the source. I also love hearing that the STUDENTS are the ones standing up againts this fraud.


students such as Kirsten Austad, 24, a first-year Harvard Medical student who is one of the movement's leaders, who said: "Harvard needs to live up to its name. We are really being indoctrinated into a field of medicine that is becoming more and more commercialized."


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


This is GOOD news!


www.ahrp.org...

-Dev



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