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Police Will Keep Driving Records For Five Years

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posted on Sep, 15 2008 @ 05:03 AM
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Police Will Keep Driving Records For Five Years


www.telegraph.co.uk

Police plan to map all journeys made by drivers on major roads and store the data for five years.

A national network of roadside cameras will be able to read 50 million number plates each day enabling officers to reconstruct the movements of motorists.

But civil rights campaigners have questioned why the data needs to be kept for so long and want reassurances on who will be allowed to access the information.

The project relies on automatic number plate recognition (ANPR) camera
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Sep, 15 2008 @ 05:03 AM
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I can't even image why this would be necessary.

The job of the police is to protect us. How does knowing where all of us are, round the clock, for five years, contribute to this objective?

Easy, it doesn't.

www.telegraph.co.uk
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Sep, 15 2008 @ 05:25 AM
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As the chief says,


Experience has show there are very strong link between illegal use of motor vehicles on the road and other types of serious crime.


And what did he mean by illegal use of motor vehicles, vehicles are meant to be driven and how do they plan to maintain that data, wont it be difficult.



posted on Sep, 15 2008 @ 05:35 AM
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I think it may be directed towards 'crimes in progress' or the like.

If a child is abducted and all they have is a licence plate (or partial), they could then, in theory, be able to refer back to travel data on the particular plate number, thus giving the authorities possible locations of interest.

Another scenario might be fleeing criminals. Being able to track the vehicle used, may lead to quicker apprehension.

With most technical advancements, you get the good with the bad.

I favor it in many ways, but like most... I don't want the government tracking me either.



posted on Sep, 15 2008 @ 05:38 AM
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Well do you think that they will be able to verify or can we say filter the bad persons from the good ones on the road judging by the tremendous amount of traffic these days



posted on Sep, 15 2008 @ 06:05 AM
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Originally posted by Grailkeeper
I think it may be directed towards 'crimes in progress' or the like.

If a child is abducted and all they have is a licence plate (or partial), they could then, in theory, be able to refer back to travel data on the particular plate number, thus giving the authorities possible locations of interest.

Another scenario might be fleeing criminals. Being able to track the vehicle used, may lead to quicker apprehension.

With most technical advancements, you get the good with the bad.

I favor it in many ways, but like most... I don't want the government tracking me either.



You're thinking like an honest person here. This makes sense to those of us who are honest but if you're a criminal and going to commit a serious crime, you're likely to remove or replace the license plate. In effect, only the people who aren't committing crime are going to end up being watched on a regular basis.




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