It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Younger evangelicals split over Palin choice as VP

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Sep, 14 2008 @ 06:16 PM
link   

When Jessica Stollings learned on Facebook that John McCain had named Sarah Palin as his running mate, the 26-year-old from Bristol, Tenn., took the day off and picked up some campaign yard signs. Just like that, she went from "just a voter" to a McCain evangelist.


Link to full story

news.yahoo.com...

Personally I find it a little disturbing that once again this election is going to be left in the hands of "God" so to speak. What say you?




posted on Sep, 14 2008 @ 06:55 PM
link   

Originally posted by Cowgirlstraitup7

Personally I find it a little disturbing that once again this election is going to be left in the hands of "God" so to speak. What say you?


I find it disturbing that you seem to think it is incorrect for someone to campaign and vote for the person whom they identify with most. The majority of Christians do not identify with Obama because he is pro-abortion. Killing babies is not seen by Christianity as a good thing. I don't understand why it is a stretch to make the connection between Christian voters and a Christian candidate.

Aside from God, people generally vote on morals. Anyone who identifies with conservative morals, which the vast majority of Christian do, would vote for McCain/Palin. To assume any differently is silly. Why would I, being a pro-life, pro-gun, pro-Christianity individual vote for Obama who is pro-abortion, anti-gun, and pro-Black Liberation Movement? Wouldn't that be incredibly hypocritical for me to have a set of morals then totally vote against them? The best choice for someone like myself is blatantly obvious. To choose anyone other than McCain/Palin would be against my moral standards.

Finally, I'm assuming you don't believe in God based on your "left in the hands of God" statement. By making that kind of statement, you sound like you think that you're superior to those who believe in God. By asserting your superiority, you must believe that you're better than absolutely anyone who believes in something bigger than themselves. So, no God, no aliens, no black holes (we haven't proven they exist), no ghosts, absolutely nothing paranormal. You just cut out quite a large chunk of the population. Sounds like you're actually the minority.

I wish I could be "enlightened"...



posted on Sep, 14 2008 @ 07:23 PM
link   
I stand by my statement. Think seperation of church and state. I don't like how politics and religion are in bed with eachother at all!



posted on Sep, 14 2008 @ 07:42 PM
link   
All of us vote for the issues we believe in. There are Pros and Cons to both parties. I would vote for Obama IF he would recognize and support the right to bear arms, denounce the "carbon credit scam" (I would rather see a true tax than this farce of paper trading to make enron style speculators and our esteemed politicians who are investing their personal money is this crap rich), DENOUNCE his own bill S2433 www.news-leader.com.../20080830/OPINIONS02/808300316
www.infowars.com... as a mistake, (If the bill is so good, stop trying to force it through buddy!)

Until then, I am stuck voting Republican
_javascript:icon('
')

[edit on 14-9-2008 by infolurker]



posted on Sep, 14 2008 @ 09:09 PM
link   

Originally posted by Cowgirlstraitup7
I stand by my statement. Think seperation of church and state. I don't like how politics and religion are in bed with eachother at all!


Agreed. But in today's society I don't see how you can expect people to leave their politics behind when they enter a church, or their church behind when they enter politics. The evangelical movement is essentially a political one, IMO.



posted on Sep, 14 2008 @ 09:45 PM
link   

Originally posted by Sestias
The evangelical movement is essentially a political one, IMO.


I believe you are 100% correct.

If indeed this is the case, the 'evangelical' party should be free of their tax exempt status.


Of course your opinion may vary...



posted on Sep, 15 2008 @ 12:21 PM
link   

Originally posted by Cowgirlstraitup7
I stand by my statement. Think seperation of church and state. I don't like how politics and religion are in bed with eachother at all!


You're saying that politicians shouldn't be able to practice their religion. You don't see where that is totally against everything American? That sounds a lot like a totalitarian way of thinking. We don't do that here.

Also, as I said above, its not so much of religion driving people to vote a specific way, it's that persons morals. Shouldn't people be able to vote on their morals?



Also, I see no problem with churches having their tax exempt status removed. Maybe then the church will truly get involved in politics and help shape this country. Of course, living in the United States, all of the liberals who so very much support free speech would have no problem with the church speaking its views.




top topics



 
0

log in

join