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Boeing 737 with 82 passenges crashes near Perm, Russia

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posted on Sep, 13 2008 @ 08:08 PM
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Boeing 737 with 82 passenges crashes near Perm, Russia


www.lenta.ru

A Boeing 737 on the way from Moscow to Perm has crashed during landing. The contact with the plane was lost shortly before landing, and the debris has been uncovered near the Russian city of Perm.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Sep, 13 2008 @ 08:08 PM
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You heard it here first. Western sources have not picked this up yet.


[edit on 13-9-2008 by maloy]



posted on Sep, 13 2008 @ 08:15 PM
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Sky News has just picked it up now. Not so many details yet, but I guess they'll update.


Boeing Plane Carrying 87 Crashes



posted on Sep, 13 2008 @ 08:29 PM
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The plane belonged to Russia's Aeroflot airline company, and was completely destroyed.


Oh my god, the plane destroyed completely
, wonder how the people suffered
, very sad to see this.



posted on Sep, 13 2008 @ 08:57 PM
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OP, any word on casualties? Hopefully someone was fortunate enough to survive.

My dear mother flew into town today. I'm grateful that she made it, safe and sound.



posted on Sep, 13 2008 @ 09:54 PM
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This related thread quotes a source claiming 88 have died in this crash.



posted on Sep, 13 2008 @ 11:04 PM
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I live in Pern sity. All is quet and nice. No panic here. Like nothing happend.



posted on Sep, 13 2008 @ 11:08 PM
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Be interested in seeing what political opponents or news reporter was on board plane. We'll see if anything is said.



posted on Sep, 13 2008 @ 11:21 PM
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As a pilot, I cringe whenever I hear about any airliner accident, or any airplane accident, for that matter.

Since it was a Boeing, and not a Russian-built airplane....I think we can rule out mechanical problems....but, I'm an armchair observer, and it's really too early to say that. I left it in, though...as a stream of thought.

Skynews reports no survivors....82 passengers, six crew.

We will see if the Russians investigate with due dilligence...and if they invite Boeing representatives (and GE, who built the engines) to be party to the investigation.



posted on Sep, 13 2008 @ 11:36 PM
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Originally posted by weedwhacker
Since it was a Boeing, and not a Russian-built airplane....I think we can rule out mechanical problems


You can't be serious.
Boeing never have mechanical problems? Are you sure you are a pilot?



posted on Sep, 13 2008 @ 11:48 PM
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reply to post by maloy
 


This reminds me of the time Viktor Bout evacuated Sese Seko and his family using one of his planes. Bullets were flying all around them when the plane took off. Sese Seko's son later said that he was happy it was a Russian plane, cause if it had been a Boeing, it would have exploded.



posted on Sep, 13 2008 @ 11:52 PM
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More news from Russia regarding the accident:

lenta.ru...



The plane is a Boeing 737-500. All 88 people are confirmed dead. During the crash the plane has damaged/destroyed about 500 meters of the railway on the Trans-Siberian railroad. All trains now have to diverted. Interfax reports that the airplane exploded during the descent/crash, and the debris is scattered over a radius of 4 kilometers.

Ria News Reports that the plane tried to make or requested an emergency landing, and that the crash might have occured due to an engine failure.



What seems to be interesting, is that the crash destroyed 500 meters of a railway and the debris is scattered over 4 kilometers. This seems to indicate that the reported "explosion" occured before the crash - while in the air. How else could a 737 cause that much debris scatter?

But then again I know little about air disasters.



posted on Sep, 13 2008 @ 11:58 PM
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Originally posted by weedwhacker
Since it was a Boeing, and not a Russian-built airplane....I think we can rule out mechanical problems...


.....

I don't know how you came to that conclusion....

As a pilot you must surely know that Boeing has had several crashes involving mechanical failure.

If you're thinking of asking for proof, Google is your friend.



posted on Sep, 13 2008 @ 11:58 PM
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reply to post by maloy
 


I agree. With 4 km of debris, it had to have exploded before it hit the ground. I've been traveling on the trans-siberian myself (1990). 3½ days + 4½ days with no shower. Lots of vodka. It was unlucky that it hit the railway. 500 meters. wow...



posted on Sep, 14 2008 @ 12:04 AM
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Originally posted by Hellmutt
This reminds me of the time Viktor Bout evacuated Sese Seko and his family using one of his planes. Bullets were flying all around them when the plane took off. Sese Seko's son later said that he was happy it was a Russian plane, cause if it had been a Boeing, it would have exploded.


Reality is that most of Russia's airline fleet is being gradually replaced by Western jets. The remaining Russian aircraft are largely used for domestic routes. There are a few new commercial jets being developed, but these appear to be more and more similar to their Boeing and Airbus counterparts.

And it is a shame - because Tu-154 is a very reliable, durable, and efficient aircraft. Westerners make a huge deal about the "reliability of Russian planes" whenever one crashes, but they have no idea how many of these birds fly every day around the world (especially in CIS countries and Africa). In fact - a very large portion of all Tu-154/134 crashes are due to some sort of pilot or maintenance error. I have flown on Tu-154 many times, and I never felt less safe than on a Boeing or Airbus.


People tend to have a very prejudicial view of Russian airplanes, and a very mistaken view. If not for the bad PR, perhaps the Russian commercial aircraft industry would have been better off today than it is. After all - no flying tin can can be faultless or 100% safe.



posted on Sep, 14 2008 @ 12:29 AM
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This is weird.
I was just watching an episode of "Aircraft investigation" or whatever it's called on google. The particular episode dealt with the Russian Aeroflot Airline crash that involved the flight of one of the first Boeing aircrafts in Russia, where the pilot allowed his kids to sit in the pilot seat during flight, and move the instruments around etc which caused the plane to crash.

My thoughts go out to all the families of the victims in this latest tragedy.

Thanks also to Maloy for "Breaking" this before the MSM.



posted on Sep, 14 2008 @ 12:33 AM
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Airplane "accidents" like this are one of the easiest ways to get rid of any difficult opposition to policy.

That'll never be discussed on teevee either.



posted on Sep, 14 2008 @ 12:42 AM
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reply to post by maloy
 




People tend to have a very prejudicial view of Russian airplanes,


Well, back in '93 I flew a couple of times on Russia's AeroFLOP (
cause we flopped about the entire time) and both flights were by far the scariest and worst flights I have ever taken. I joke now about it, but those flights were just BAD.

In reards to this incident
I can only feel sadness for all those people. Thanks for bringing this to our attention FIRST



posted on Sep, 14 2008 @ 01:17 AM
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maloy, Russia has had excellent planes like Il-76,Tu-154 which are very reliable , but why do they purchase these boeings???

p.s I never liked boeings, I always felt safer in a Airbus built plane

Tu-154 is much more sturdier built
[edit on 14-9-2008 by manson_322]

[edit on 14-9-2008 by manson_322]



posted on Sep, 14 2008 @ 01:37 AM
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reply to post by maloy
 


OK, maloy...point taken.

Tupelov are built like a tank. But isn't it interesting that Aero Flot has turned to buying airplanes from the 'West'??

I was just speculating, prematurely.

It was a landing accident. What were the weather conditions at the time? What ground-based facilities does that airport at Perm have?

Is it in mountainous terrain? Because, sometimes poor navigation, whilst maneuvering to land, in mountainous areas, might be the cause.

Was it daytime, or nighttime? Also factors to be considered.

How qualified were the flight crew?

I have something like 4000 hours on the B737, and have flown the B737-500 variant, along with it's older brother, the B737-300. Not to mention, the NG versions....B737-700 and -800 and -900.



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