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NASA confirm `growths` on Phoenix lander

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sty

posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 07:18 AM
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reply to post by nj2day
 


Rust? you mean there is oxygen?




posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 07:21 AM
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reply to post by sty
 


well.. maybe not oxygen directly... but any compound containing O molecules can cause rust...

Its a known fact that the surface of mars is covered with Iron Oxide... which is rust..

this site does a good job at explaining how it happens without straight up O2 being present:

starryskies.com...


In 2000, an experiment was conducted to test this theory using a chunk of labradorite, a mineral very commonly found in Martian soil. The labradorite was put in a test tube which was filled with gases composed very similar to the atmosphere on Mars. To mimic temperature, the tube was chilled to a typical Mars-like minus 76 degrees Fahrenheit. Then the scientists exposed the tube and labradorite to ultraviolet light to mimic the effects of sunlight on Mars. There isn't an ozone layer on Mars like ours, the Martian ozone layer is very thin. Because of this, a lot of ultraviolet radiation gets through the Martain atmosphere to the surface. After the experiment had run for a week the sample was analyzed. The scientists were looking for negatively charged oxygen molecules that are capable of causing iron oxidation even with no water present.

Sure enough, the molecules were there, proving the theory.




[edit on 18-2-2009 by nj2day]



posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 07:57 AM
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reply to post by ElectroMagnetic Multivers
 



I would lean towards rust myself as well. or a Rust type substance considering the make up of mars.

I am interested in the "puddle" as well, If you take the available photo's into Photoshop(or equivalent) do a quick brightness/contract adjustment on it. and zoom in to about 300%(any more it gets way to pixelated). it does somewhat resemble a puddle or liquid.

May be just a trick of the shadows or something, but it got my interest enough to check it out.

it makes it interesting to entertain the idea of "mars Barnacles" as someone said



posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 10:38 AM
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reply to post by nj2day
 


Interesting article here which was pointed out in another thread.

First liquid water may have been spotted on Mars




posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 10:48 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Wow! I had no idea!

that's amazing! if the Salts did indeed keep liquid water around... we may score the biggest clue as to our ancestry!

namely.. the organisms would look different... but if DNA is the primary replicator... we'll know for sure that life started elsewhere...

If DNA is not the primary replicator, we'll know that our form of life is unique... and that life isn't nessesarily all that rare!

Hope there's liquid... if there's life... that's where it'll be!



posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 12:52 PM
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if the surface is covered with iron oxide.

could this be iron particles sticking to a magnetized leg of the craft?

ever see iron filings stuck to a magnet? they stand up in clumps

lunchman



posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 01:16 PM
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I have heard of theories that dust is the bringer of life...that particles in the air hold the magic. I remember reading that if you leave out a dish in the open air....growth soon appears in this dish (one of those scientific dish thingies). Anyone know more about that being possible...and particles in the air/atmosphere on other planets? If so, this could explain where the particles are coming from, like a angle, following a magnetic line of sorts. Our dusts seems to follow along a magnetic wave. This is all assumptions and its hard to describe what I am talking about when I know little about it.

LV



posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 01:24 PM
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Originally posted by Thill
Those "drops" have a definite height (hard to explain) , and somehow I doubt water can "grow" from day to day(meaning , there is more and more o those dots , every day)


It does look like some of them are casting a slight shadow. Unless it's a trick of the light and my eyes, which is entirely possible, it would have to have some height to it to cast a shadow. (I think I know what you meant by definite height.. Could be wrong though.)

Edit: Sorry, didn't mean to kill the thread!


[edit on 18-2-2009 by Jenna]



posted on Feb, 27 2009 @ 11:54 PM
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It would appear that the lander had to wee wee, and some splashed onto the leg and dried. That explains the puddle and the leg.

Seriously, do you think anything on that lander could rust? I suspect it's not iron based. Too heavy. Probably some exotic, like titanium.



posted on Feb, 28 2009 @ 12:10 AM
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Originally posted by mr-lizard
Interesting...

But surely this would prevent any sample from returning to earth, in fear of contamination with alien substance.


Or would it?

Someone educate me.



Or even worse the lander introduced Earth microbes into the Martian habitat and may contaminate any indigenous life there.:bnghd:



posted on Feb, 28 2009 @ 12:58 AM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 

Safe exploration measures were taken prior to launch.
www.space.com...



posted on Feb, 28 2009 @ 01:06 AM
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If I had to take a guess I think I would I go w/ mud of some kind. Somethin splashed that little "puddle" underneath the rover and it got on the leg. It would explain why its only on that leg alone, and not the others. I would think if its some kind of rust, or living organism it wouldn't be secluded to one section of the rover.



posted on Feb, 28 2009 @ 03:21 PM
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reply to post by -NewSense-
 


Yeah but it seems to be increasing in size stay tuned.
I will try and follow along on this and see if it indeed increases even more.



posted on Feb, 28 2009 @ 04:55 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


As I pointed out, just a couple of posts prior:

NASA's Phoenix lander may have captured the first images of liquid water on Mars - droplets that apparently splashed onto the spacecraft's leg during landing, according to some members of the Phoenix team.
www.newscientist.com...



posted on Feb, 28 2009 @ 05:13 PM
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Did anyone actually READ THE ARTICLE??? It seems not.

The bumps only appear on the leg strut that has the most shading. This would lead to the idea that condensation could be involved. Condensation combined with mineral salts that blew upon the leg during landing could easily explain the "growths."

As for rust, while the lander leg struts are not made of ferrous materials, oxidation could indeed be occurring. We know that the soil of Mars is highly oxidizing. Someone mentioned the green tarnish of Brass in an earlier post. This is what happens with Brass oxidation. Aluminum gets a powdery coating and eventually pits due to oxidation. Depending on the materials involved, and the dust from the martian soil, along with condensation and shading, it is not surprising that some form of oxidation is going on.

As for the "puddle".... it is named 'Holy Cow', Perhaps you should read the articles linked to in the OP.



posted on Feb, 28 2009 @ 05:14 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


So your saying it's just an accumulation of sand or dust stuck to the "WATER" droplets?



posted on Feb, 28 2009 @ 05:22 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


At this point it's a more rational explanation than life.

Ever leave spilled salt out overnight? Ever notice the little droplets of water there the next morning?



posted on Feb, 28 2009 @ 05:36 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Rational or not, How impossible would it be if it was some form of bacteria growing on the vehicle? I mean why not?

We still just do not know enough about Mars to just flatly say NO!



posted on Feb, 28 2009 @ 05:50 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


There's absolutely nothing irrational or impossible about something growing on one of the landers as to the best of our knowledge life was detected on Mars back in 1976. There is definetely standing water on Mars and the question is really if it's lakes, rivers of oceans.
Don't let the guys like Terapin and Phage discourage you from typing in catch phrases on google and being very surprised by what you can put together trough simple press clipping from numerous article's and press releases.

Just be happy your not the type of person that logs online to perpetuate whatever happened to be the scientific norm two decades ago as it must really suck to live in a world where nothing ever changes.

PS. If you can't muster up the energy to google just stick around as Phage and Terapin will probably keep doing what their doing meaning that i would have to , once again, show that their not only telling only half the story but the most boring and irrational half at that.

Stellar



posted on Feb, 28 2009 @ 05:56 PM
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Swamp Gas the second I opened the link you posted, about the white house briefing? I instantly knew and thought the exact same thing when I read the thread title and saw Nasa picture, I didn't go back over the Briefing thread, but if I remember rightly, not long after, didn't bush do something to shut them up?



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