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Forbidden Endocrinology

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posted on Sep, 30 2008 @ 05:33 PM
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Another article:

Omega-6 fatty acid intake tied to breast cancer



A previous analysis of data from this study had found high blood fats and high insulin levels -- both of which have been linked to breast cancer -- in women who consumed lots of low-fiber bread, Sonestedt and her team note. This could help explain the relationship in the current study, because women with low HA consumption ate more bread, cookies and cakes, the researchers say.

They conclude, based on their research, that a diet "very high in omega-6 PUFA may promote breast cancer development."


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


I mean, it couldn't be any easier finding articles and studies that support this thread. High grain diets are usually high in omega 6 fatty acids, which have been shown to be Pro-Cancer and Pro-Inflamatory.

Once again, high insulin levels linked to cancer.




posted on Oct, 8 2008 @ 06:45 PM
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(NaturalNews) Just one week of exercise appeared to reduce the risk of diabetes in sedentary older people at risk of the disease, according to a study conducted by researchers from the University of Michigan and published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

After one week, insulin sensitivity in the participants had decreased by 53 percent, while beta cell function had improved by 28 percent. No changes were detected in other diabetes risk factors such as body fat mass or blood fat levels.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


www.naturalnews.com...


Keeping on subject with Endocrinology, I thought I'd add another article. Beta cells are found in the pancreas. They are responsible for producing insulin when blood glucose levels spike. Unfortunately, insulin resistance, if severe enough, can cause these cells to burn out, haltering their ability to produce insulin. When this happens in Type 2 diabetics, they become insulin dependent and are placed on an insulin prescription.

This study show that exercising can improve beta cell function, which is a very good thing. It is, however, important to understand that exercise alone will not do the trick. Now, the article states that the test subjects noticed a 53% decrease in Insulin Sensitivity. That's not good, however, it can be reversed by combining proper diet with exercising.

So to sum it up: Yes, exercise is a great way to lower your risk for developing diabetes but only as a side-kick to proper diet.

-Dev



posted on Oct, 12 2008 @ 01:01 AM
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I realize this is an old thread, but if anyone is still watching or interested this may not be a useless bump to an old thread. The original post is more or less very correct, for me at least. I had pancreantitis a few years ago, was in the hospital for eleven days, almost died, it was definitely not cool. After that I was diagnosed with diabetes, can't remember which type because I completely thought it was bogus. I knew I was overweight, but I didn't see how I could feel and function 100% normal, then suddenly in one day experience every diabetic symptom and become hospitalized with diabetes. I reasoned that I had put a metric ass ton of stress on my endocrine system not eating properly and being overweight, moreso than I had diabetes and it finally decided to bite me. Anyway, I was put on medication for my diabetes and given these crazy testing supplies and all that jazz. For a year I worked out, stuck to a very very strict diet, took my medicine, and tested myself. I lost 50 pounds very quickly (and became more attractive, which totally rocked). There was never a time that my glucose levels every went out of what's normal for me that entire year. I decided to do an experiment, by stopping my medication. A year went by without my medication, and my glucose levels remained normal with not even the least bit of fluctuation. At that time I assumed the diabetes was bogus and the pancreantitis was a result of my careless treatment of my body. Not too long after that I went through some serious trauma and began checking my sugar compulsively, this got so out of hand I couldn't wear short sleeve shirts because I began checking my sugar all over my arms, sometimes I would check it three or four times back to back just to make sure. I was a total wreck. Basically, I was having panic attacks and PTSD from this traumatic experience. I would get really bad panic attacks and sometimes pass out from hyperventilation, or feel as though I would pass out because of lightheadedness. I messed up and read the symptoms to a hypoglycemic rebound and concluded that what was happening was low sugar. I knew starches and grains and such would rise my sugar, so I began to binge on things of that nature. Everytime I got nervous or panicy, I'd binge on bread and peanut butter. I started getting sick again and my sugar was getting exponentially higher. I finally was diagnosed with PTSD after I had a total breakdown and was hospitalized for that. I did some reading, pulled myself together, and realized every bit of it was because of starches and whole grains and my intolerance to them. Do yourself a favor and really look into this if you care about your body. It is NOT fun to go through what I've been through, all because of an eating habit.

[edit on 12-10-2008 by Thewayshemoves]



posted on Oct, 12 2008 @ 06:44 PM
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reply to post by Thewayshemoves
 


Thank you for sharing your story. It's very interesting.

I tried going off all starches for 10 days and it didn't help me any, so apparently that's not my particular problem, but I know that it is for a lot of people.



posted on Oct, 12 2008 @ 10:57 PM
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1 in 33 people in ireland are gluten intolerant. it takes an average of 10-20 years to be diagnosed. 1 in 300 people in the US are gluten intolerant. it is very under diagnosed! props to the op for posting this information.



posted on Oct, 12 2008 @ 11:06 PM
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reply to post by DevolutionEvolvd
 




Starred, Flagged .. GREAT thread

Thank you : )


Have saved it

Will return to it

Thanks again



posted on Oct, 12 2008 @ 11:22 PM
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i have discovered the benefits of going off the carb-rich diet. WEight-loss, increased energy, and better skin. My hair was falling out before I changed my diet and now I have a thick, rich hair again. I used to have problem skin, acne, clogged follicles etc. Now I have clear and bright skin.

However, my diet is limited. I eat beef and some chicken. I went off beef for awhile, about a month, and ate nothing but chicken and turkey, but I didn't feel any better for it. Went back to beef and suddenly I was jumping off the walls with energy.

A lot of vegetables are a no-no. No carrots, no tomatoes, potatoes, parsnips, beans, peas, etc.. I can eat brocolli, cauliflower (but may be too sulphurous), and spinach.

I can't eat apples, oranges, bananas, or grapes. Most fruit makes my blood sugar crash very quickly. I can eat berries though. Blueberries and raspberries are the best and I eat those for dessert.

I have to stay away from cheese and most dairy too. Too much lactose. But heavy cream is okay in moderation.

I really should get off coffee but I try to compensate by drinking alot more water. But I have to do that anyway with the higher protein.

Nuts? Well, in moderation. But I have to stick to almonds (unroasted), and cashews in very small quantities.

My last vice though is chocolate. I only allow myself a little bit ever couple of weeks.

The paleo diet is hard to follow but it's worth it. Next I just have to start eating my meat more rare so that I can get benefit of the enzymes..



posted on Oct, 13 2008 @ 12:10 AM
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Interesting.
I was going to post that celiac disease never causes obesity, but paused to do some research first.

To my astonishment I discovered the OP is correct, and celiac disease, although often causing debilitating thinness, can in some people cause uncontrollable weight gain.



posted on Oct, 14 2008 @ 05:56 PM
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reply to post by Thewayshemoves
 


Thanks for sharing! I think it's important for people to hear stories like yours. It's a good slap in the face that wakes people up to the fact that, yes, good health depends on a good diet.



posted on Oct, 14 2008 @ 06:29 PM
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Originally posted by juniperberry
i have discovered the benefits of going off the carb-rich diet. WEight-loss, increased energy, and better skin. My hair was falling out before I changed my diet and now I have a thick, rich hair again. I used to have problem skin, acne, clogged follicles etc. Now I have clear and bright skin.


Most high-carb diets are also low in fat. Conversely, a high-protein diet usually provides more than enough fat. I can say that when I switched to a moderate-fat diet, my skin cleared overnight. Oil is fat. If you don't get enough fat in your diet, your body can't properly hydrate your skin and hairl.



Went back to beef and suddenly I was jumping off the walls with energy.


Hmm, maybe because of the amount of fat found in beef, compared to lean cuts of chicken and turkey? Your body prefers to use fat as energy. Restricting carbs allows your body use protein and fat as energy, which is far more efficient than carbs. The daily requirement for carbohydrates, in terms of survival, is 0g. But guess what, you have to eat protein and fat.




A lot of vegetables are a no-no. No carrots, no tomatoes, potatoes, parsnips, beans, peas, etc.. I can eat brocolli, cauliflower (but may be too sulphurous), and spinach.


Interesting. The first list of vegetables you mentioned happen to be high in sugar, relatively speaking. As for the latter, the opposite is true.



I can't eat apples, oranges, bananas, or grapes. Most fruit makes my blood sugar crash very quickly. I can eat berries though. Blueberries and raspberries are the best and I eat those for dessert.


Once again, oranges, bananas and grapes happen to be fruits that are relatively high in sugar. The reason why blueberries have less of a metabolic effect on you, I believe, is due to the high amount of fiber in the berry. Fiber slows down the metabolic process that takes place when digesting and absorbing sugar. Slower absorption= lower bloodsugar.



The paleo diet is hard to follow but it's worth it. Next I just have to start eating my meat more rare so that I can get benefit of the enzymes..


Ask yourself, do you want to live to eat, or eat to live? I'll stick with the latter and treat myself every now and then.



posted on Nov, 13 2008 @ 03:03 PM
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This isn't the first time in history that poor dietary habits led to disease and obesity. With Egyptologists, Archaeologists and Paleopathologists all working together, and with the vast amounts of mummies available for examination, we can determine the Ancient Egyptian's diet, average lifespan and cause of death.



We pointed out that several thousand years ago when the future mummies roamed the earth their diet was a nutritionist’s nirvana. At least a nirvana for all the so-called nutritional experts of today who are recommending a diet filled with whole grains, fresh fruits and vegetables, and little meat, especially red meat. Follow such a diet, we’re told, and we will enjoy abundant health.

Unfortunately, it didn’t work that way for the Egyptians. They followed such a diet simply because that’s all there was. There was no sugar - it wouldn’t be produced for another thousand or more years. The only sweet was honey, which was consumed in limited amounts. The primary staple was a coarse bread made of stone-ground, whole wheat. The banks of the Nile provided fertile soil for growing all kinds of fruits and vegetables, all of which were a part the low-fat, high-carbohydrate Egyptian diet.

*SNIP*

Were the nutritionists of today right about their ideas of the ideal diet, the ancient Egyptians should have had abundant health. But they didn’t. In fact, they suffered pretty miserable health. Many had heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity - all the same disorders that we experience today in the ‘civilized’ Western world. Diseases that Paleolithic man, our really ancient ancestors, appeared to escape.


www.proteinpower.com... ypt/

So much for obesity being caused by stress and the demands of modern day life. What else could be blamed on "modern" influences?......



One other interesting aspect of Hatshepsut’s mummy is that it appears that she died from metastatic cancer.


Now this can't be proved conclusively but it has been found that the ancient egyptians also suffered from cancer.
So much for cancer being driven by envirenmental contaminants, there were none in those ancient times.

So, on one hand we have modern day americans and ancient egyptians all dying from a single common cause, excessive carbohydrate intake that leads to Hyperinsulinemia. This condition is causing almost all known modern diseases of man, including cancer. Now, on the other hand, we have the pre-westernized eskimos. A people in which cancer was uknown. A people that were not overweight, contrary to popular belief, and still ate a diet that consisted of almost 0% carbs.


-Dev



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