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Finalising the BOB!

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posted on Sep, 8 2008 @ 02:38 PM
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Have you sorted out your BOB? If not, why not?

Camping, SITX or just a thing to grab if your house is burning down around you! This piece of kit is very important.



Got some more stuff packed and stored into my BOB today. Time was short today but I did a quick check over the stuff.
The portable TV was fcked (old age maybe?) so away that went to the great TV place in the sky.
Importantly the Purifier kit and roll mat were configured and installed.



One rocket pouch removed and a roll mat in its place. All sorted so its just throw on the back and off you go!


The whole thing is about 10-11 kgs and is pretty comfortable once you've got it sitting high on your shoulders.

The last thing is the camelback kit strapped into the top pouch and it's ready to rocknrolla!




posted on Sep, 8 2008 @ 06:23 PM
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Dont suppose if you have the time you could do some breakdown shots of all the goodies inside.

im currently taking pics of my edc (every day carry) ill have to post them up soon.



posted on Sep, 8 2008 @ 06:39 PM
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Originally posted by WatchRider
The portable TV was fcked (old age maybe?) so away that went to the great TV place in the sky.


Portable TV? PORTABLE TV???? How dare you ,sir, be so common!

I, on the other hand, carry a wind-up radio with the dial welded to BBC Radio 4...a far better class of BoB equipment if i dare say



[edit on 8-9-2008 by citizen smith]



posted on Sep, 9 2008 @ 05:24 AM
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reply to post by WatchRider
 


Nice looking piece of kit! As jericanman has mentioned, could you possibily take post a couple of pics and info of whats inside it?

Thanks!



posted on Sep, 9 2008 @ 05:35 AM
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Smooth looking bit of kit you have there!

The sponge mat is a bit excessive, wouldn't you say?



posted on Sep, 9 2008 @ 10:25 AM
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The roll mat is quite essential I'm afraid, you try sleeping on concrete or frozen ground, remember in the uk the weather isn't very pleasant. It also prevents your sleeping bag becoming covered in sht and dirt too

Sure you can soften the ground with materials around you, but what if you haven't time or energy to mooch about for that!

I've got some spare time, so I'm gonna mooch about outside for some stuff, while I'm there I'll get some pics



posted on Sep, 9 2008 @ 10:38 AM
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reply to post by WatchRider
 


I suppose it depends on the type of sleeping bag you have.

Ive got a huge, padded 2.35m 4-seasons one which I have used to lie on bare rocks before and was fine!



posted on Sep, 9 2008 @ 10:47 AM
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Maybe man maybe, each to his own I say, I've always been of the small sleeping bag school of thought as opposed to the big padded ones.
It really is 6 and two 3s mate.



posted on Sep, 9 2008 @ 10:54 AM
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reply to post by WatchRider
 


Hehe I agree. Thats what I find interesting about survival preps... each person has their own take of things.

Im sure we would all be interested in pictures and breakdown of the components of your kit mate!



posted on Sep, 9 2008 @ 12:30 PM
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Nice pics.

What litre size is your BOB ?????
I am just about to purchase a new one and was wondering what a good enrty size would be.

colec156



posted on Sep, 9 2008 @ 02:54 PM
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Excluding the side rocket pouch - 100 litres.

Including the side rocket pouch - 110 litres.

This is large as a BOB should be really. A nice smaller one of about 60 - 70 litres is nice too. An entry size for those unknowing to the ways of heavier BOBs.
If you are used to heavy bergens and weight on your back an 'entry' BOB could be any size!

I prefer the outer limits in size for greater range and distance while on the move.
With the BOB I've got I reckon on about 2 weeks purely on the food and gathered water from streams and lakes.
With the stuff you find, hunt and eat is obviously good for extending the BOBs supplies.
The biggest weight is the food and water. Camping gas should be kept to a minimum and used only if you can't find material nearby for fire making.
You'll have pretty much most if not all the stuff you need to worry less on surviving locally, and more on getting to where to you are going and setting up a base of ops.

One thing few people realise is that a persons build is as important in choosing a BOB as the BOB itself.
You can have a big bergen or BOB and that's ok, as long as your body-type is suited to it.
As a general rule of thumb stocky guys will do better with a more wider and stumpy type of BOB. Bigger / taller guys a taller, thinner one is a prime choice for long-distance comfort.

farm4.static.flickr.com...

When I was in the forces the 'issue' bergens for non-infantry guys were these crappy, dumpy things.
They are ok for stocky beefcake guys of a short height (up to 5"8).
So for some they are ok and do the job well but for most guys, the general feedback was and is that they are a sub-standard bergen and uncomfortable at long-distance work when there's plenty of better ones.
The capacity is only 80 litres but for the design it ought to be more.
They zip up like a handbag on the top and getting all yer stuff in was a nightmare (zips are often the first thing to go).
With both rocket pouches on the side you may resemble a ninja turtle sans weaponry!
It must be said though that for all the criticism this type of bergen is very cheap and affordable (probably why the BA issues them to every tom dick and harry!).
Some dude called Slipstream on flickr actually uses one of these for his BOB so for some people they are ok.



The next style of Bergen you see on my OP pictures:
Infantry PLCE bergen 100 litres, long back.
A variant on this is a shorter version of the Inf PLCE bergen known as the short back. I haven't seen too many of these around though.

Don't let the complex name put you off, I would easily claim this is probably one of the best big bergens in the world. The SAS / SF guys use this and they aren't in the business of wearing crap so if big bergens / BOBs are your thing go for this option.
This is a very cool kinda bergen, even in the armed forces having one of these was and is usually uncommon outside of SF and Inf Regiments.
These days they are usually about $120 + but they have come down in price from the late 90s when $200 was not uncommon so now is a good time to buy.
The only down side is that you will stand out the most in urban areas and military troops in the know may or may not suspect you're a prepped survivalist (SITX). These bergens are available in Olive drab which is generally less noticeable than dpm but is scarcer to find these days.

The nice middle of the road option is the patrol pack:



This is about 50 - 60 litres all in and is a nice middle ground option.



A smaller option is the rocket packs joined together (zipped) and then using as yoke to shoulder them use them as a daysack. AKA rocket packs (if only!).
This has never been my thing, you have a small compact BOB, BUT you've not got a true 20+ litre carrying capacity. More like 10 + 10 litres. It also hasn't got the complete nature of the above BOBs which have the full harness adjustment straps and belts etc.

Civilian ones are ok. They tend to less robust though, which, while lending them a slight weight loss, means they are usually not as tough and the plastic tends to weaken / break after a few months of use.
That said they are usually more discrete and ordinary looking / easy on the eye.
I use a north face civilian back-pack for traveling in abroad and despite only costing me $5 in a cambodian market in Phnom Phen it has lasted me 7 years (so far) of being lugged about on Dive Boats, beaches, countryside and backpacking all over the place.
That's about 30 litres which is good for civilised livin' without carryin' food, water, shelter and sleeping kit












[edit on 9-9-2008 by WatchRider]



posted on Sep, 17 2008 @ 12:52 PM
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Originally posted by 44soulslayer
reply to post by WatchRider
 


Hehe I agree. Thats what I find interesting about survival preps... each person has their own take of things.

Im sure we would all be interested in pictures and breakdown of the components of your kit mate!


Just got the camelbak today and fitted it to the BOB.

I was checking through the gear (which I do every month anyway)

But since you asked I got the camera going for the curious and new-comers to the BOB game!

Here's a breakdown with pics of the BOB:

External kit:





Roll mat
Camelbak
Kukri

Main Compartment



NOTE: Waterproof interior with a water proof flap to cut down water ingress in foul weather.




Boots
Spare change of clothes
Poncho
Silk scarf (my luxury bit!)
Water filter (MSR)
Towel, Wash and shave kit
Gaffer tape / duct tape
Canister of camping gas (230g)
Cold weather fleece

Top Compartment:



Spare Rations
Para cord
GPS
Tent Pegs
Hunting / Skinning knife

Left Compartment:



Sleeping bag
Rations for cooking
Mess tin
Spoon
First Aid Kit
Self-lighting Stove

Pouch:



Water Canteen / Bottle
3 x Bungees
2 x Chemical lights
Sealed bag containing Survival tin (assorted bits and bobs including fire striker block), spare cig. lighter & matches.

That's it for now. As is it weighs about 11 kilos (not including boots and water). Very comfortable once on the back too!

Just need a sling for the crossbow, a quiver and some waterproofs now!


[edit on 17-9-2008 by WatchRider]



posted on Sep, 17 2008 @ 05:42 PM
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Nice kit, but a few questions/statements:

1. Do you have an cold-weather attachment? If not, why?

2. Does your ruck have an internal frame? Does it have a frame at all? If it doesn't, it's time to invest in a new ruck.

3. Do you have a vest? Not bulletproof, but webbing or the like? I've always found those things damn handy. 5.11 makes some decent civvie-looking ones, but then again, in some cases, subtlety may not be in the cards.

4. The earth hates you, and wants you to die. Sleeping pads for the win, though I'd sling it under the ruck.

5. Where's your first aid kit?

DE



posted on Sep, 17 2008 @ 07:09 PM
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Originally posted by DeusEx
Nice kit, but a few questions/statements:

1. Do you have an cold-weather attachment? If not, why?

2. Does your ruck have an internal frame? Does it have a frame at all? If it doesn't, it's time to invest in a new ruck.

3. Do you have a vest? Not bulletproof, but webbing or the like? I've always found those things damn handy. 5.11 makes some decent civvie-looking ones, but then again, in some cases, subtlety may not be in the cards.

4. The earth hates you, and wants you to die. Sleeping pads for the win, though I'd sling it under the ruck.

5. Where's your first aid kit?

DE


Cold-weather attachment?? Not quite following what you mean? In relation to what exactly.
I've gone out in freezing weather with one and not had probs. Pse explain what you mean Mr Deus.

Yes it does have an internal frame!

I made sure it had one and checked it on purchase. A very important bit of kit.

Not got a vest yet, that is down on the priority list, however I am looking into one.

First aid kit is here! it's the in the tupperware container!




Win? Winners?
Yeah I know some dudes will wax lyrical thoughts about putting another rocket pouch in the roll-mats place but trying to sleep on the hard earth is humbling at best. With this at least your body feels like its getting respite from the days trek etc.



posted on Sep, 17 2008 @ 07:33 PM
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My BOB currently has an attachment full of cold-weather kit, specifically. I can take it off in summer, put it on in winter, and have exactly what I need while cutting weight for summer/fall/spring. It makes all the difference in the Soviet Republic of Canuckistan, where temperatures drop to -30C or further.

Pardon my youthful expression, but sleeping pads are a must. I still say you should sling it from the UNDERSIDE of your ruck, attack another Large Ruck Pouch, and fill it with better first aid supplies. They might add a whole pound to the weight of your ruck, but might save your life or the lives of others. Your tupperware doesn't seem to have anything to deal with medium/serious bleeding, though it looks like it has a little bit of burn stuff. Also, no ACE bandages? Can I get a list of what's in there?

DE



posted on Sep, 18 2008 @ 12:10 PM
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Hmm, wisdom and ideas to look into on the underslung roll mat. I may consider what you've said as I could do with some more space for gear.
I'll get back to you with the first aid load-out, my bergen is back in storage outside and I'm whacked out with this cold fever right now.



posted on Sep, 28 2008 @ 01:12 PM
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Just added the final, final things to the BOB.



They are:

Pocket Radio

20 AA batteries (sealed)

Home made irritant gas.

Lens cleaning cloth

Pack of purification tablets

hand warmer box

Space Blanket

Baby Wipes

Vic Vapour Rube (eliminates nearby bad odours and clears airways)

Earplugs

Underneath all that you can just see a black thing, that's an underclothes shoulder holster. Good for most brief searches so that you can stash gold and other stuff like documents and things inside.

[edit on 28-9-2008 by WatchRider]



posted on Sep, 28 2008 @ 02:27 PM
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I think you should dump the commando knife and get something more usefull, they are just to brittle for real world use, but if you REALLY love the double edged type tool I really reccomend the CRKT AG Russell Sting 1 A , its shorter, thicker, cheaper and made of much better metal. I use one as my primary cp back up when I have to go into cities wearing a suit.

Nice Kukri, I used to use one but because I needed to reduce the amount of weight I carried when planning on bugging out on foot, I binned it for an AK 47 Bayonet.

Have a trawl through the thread about bobs on zombiesquad.com, theres some great photo articles.
cheers
NR



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