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'Citations For Profanity' Not Good To ACLU's Ears

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posted on Sep, 3 2008 @ 08:16 PM
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'Citations For Profanity' Not Good To ACLU's Ears


www.chron.com

PITTSBURGH — City police wrote nearly 200 disorderly conduct citations over a 32-month period for swearing, obscene gestures and other acts deemed disrespectful, a number that a civil rights group said was unacceptable and showed a lack of officer training.

After filing a Right to Know request, the American Civil Liberties Union found 188 such citations between March 1, 2005, and Oct. 31.

"Nobody likes to get sworn at, but you can't make it a crime," said Witold Walczak, legal director for the American Civil Liberties Foundation of Pennsylvania.

(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Sep, 3 2008 @ 08:16 PM
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Hmm, not sure what to say on this one---SWEARING as a fineable offense? I will let folks who are well versed in law chime on this one...

I can understand verbal threats and whatnot, but is using foul language a punishable crime? Is that considered a freedom of speech / constitutional issue, or is that out of those bounds?


Walczak said officers were wrong to cite a woman who said, "I'm a (expletive) passenger," during a traffic stop; a woman who was "swearing profanities to a companion in front of the Girl Scouts"; and a man who "engaged in loud noise, racial slurs and pig remarks."




www.chron.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Sep, 3 2008 @ 08:47 PM
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The issue of swearing in public can be a very sticky wicket. It is hard to discuss and not appear hypocritical.

I am personally offended when I hear someone using excess profanity even though I have used swear words many times.

Just as a person should drink alcohol responsibly I believe the same goes for swearing. Preferably we should refrain from swearing in the presence of children and most women. There are some women that would make a sailor blush but it isn't the norm.

In my opinion it is an issue of respect for others. I do not agree that it should be a punishable offense. I do feel a business owner should have the right to ask a patron to leave the premises if necessary due to swearing.



posted on Sep, 3 2008 @ 08:49 PM
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I know that a woman was recently arrested by a Fire Marshall, yes a Fire Marshall, for using the F word in a Wal-Mart. Apparently it was used in relation to something she forgot to purchase or the like. She was charged with disorderly conduct, which seems to be the case in many of these citations and arrests involving profanity.

I have a big problem with the disorderly conduct laws in general. To me these laws are so vague that the interpretation of such can vary from officer to officer. Leaving us vulnerable to citation and detention from everything from profanity to acting "bizarre" in public. I don't believe these laws should exist, at least how they are currently worded.

It makes me sick. Yeah, I shouldn't walk out my front door and start uttering profanities, but I think it should be my right to do so if I choose. Freedom of speech anyone?

[edit on 3-9-2008 by Osiris1953]



posted on Sep, 3 2008 @ 09:36 PM
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The verbiage used to describe the crime is the problem.

This is simple.

The 'Police-minded' want the right to 'punish' disrespect.

Disrespect for authority.

For THE authority.

The person with the weapons.

The one who won't be 'detained' or 'questioned'.




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