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Weird Shadows on Mars!!! What Are They??

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posted on Aug, 31 2008 @ 02:12 PM
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Its abovious there is a wind creating a spectrum of material from the ejection source. It also looks as though the wind blows a constant pattern from the same direction.

The material ejecting shows to be dark matter and could be a wet mixed substance of water. For it to be oil based would suggest an ancient past with decomposing organic material.

The other possible substance would be gas and volcanic material mixed. Looking at mars olympus mons shows a rather telling similarity to the colorations of volcanic ejection.

I will venture a guess, the images are of early morning, say 10 or 11 o'clock based on our sunrise time. This could be a moment of heating the subsurface gas to erupt or gravity effect on the mars sun tidal affect splitting open ice cover of ejection vents.

Starred and flagged, good post with thought compelling, searching interest.




posted on Aug, 31 2008 @ 02:18 PM
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Originally posted by Lebowski achiever
reply to post by zorgon
 


Wow... but again. The shadows seem to be all over the place. Why is that? Are they shadows? Could it be oil (!) as in fossil fuel be leaking out there?


That was my thought exactly...oil! The mother load of oil! Eureka!



posted on Aug, 31 2008 @ 02:22 PM
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Originally posted by jimmyjackblack
Oil or water would be my first guess, just cause it makes more sense.
If it's oil, then hey, guess we'll be drillin' on mars eh?


Yes levitaing ice with black sand geysers does seem a bit out there... but hey thats what the 'scientists' are telling us


Funny thing though you mention drilling...

It seems while on the front of it they are telling us one thing, behind the scenes its a different story...



MARS DEEP DRILLING REMAINS A HIGH PRIORITY
Humboldt C. Mandell
THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS CENTER FOR SPACE RESEARCH

In 1992, The University of Texas Center for Space Research (CSR) submitted a proposal to the NASA Scout Program to drill a “deep” well on Mars.

Deep drilling is the only way to verify the character of the Martian subsurface, particularly to characterize any water to be found there, and eventually to
explore for liquid water.

During the preparation of the Scout proposal, a very strong team was forged, and several of the team members, including NASA Centers, have expressed a strong interest in pursuing this mission in the near future. In its existing programs (GRACE, ICESAT, others), CSR has developed strong international ties, particularly with Germany. The GRACE partnership resulted in a sharing of mission expenses between the two countries. This type of partnership remains very viable for a Mars Deep Drilling Mission.

Baker Hughes, Inc., and the NASA Johnson Space Center have built and tested a prototype Mars deep drill, so the technology risk has been greatly reduced. All of these factors come together to suggest that a very low cost, low risk mission can be proposed to NASA, either in response to a future Scout mission call, or as an independent international mission.


This file is in the public domain available on CD from LPI

Mars Drill


A Mars prototype drill was evaluated at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif., before shipment to Haughton Crater on Devon Island in Canada's Nunavut Territory north of Ontario and Quebec. The device will bore into permafrost and broken rock in the crater in the Canadian arctic from July 14 to July 29, 2006, with a final demonstration planned for July 27 from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. CDT. NASA scientists say that this may be the first time automation will have completely controlled a drill rig. During the field exercise, the researchers' main objective is to evaluate the artificial intelligence software that will control the rig, not other aspects of Mars drilling such as sample analysis and robotics design.


www.nasa.gov...

They have been doing a LOT of testing at the "Mars on Earth" site and even have developed a Humvee to be used on Mars




www.marsinstitute.info...

Four questions come to mind

1) How will they get it up there?
2) What fuel will it use?
3) What does it use for a heater to keep the engine from freezing
4) How do you drive it in a spacesuit?

So far Humvee has declined to answer


There is a LOT more going on than you hear about on the News and from NASA's PUBLIC channels

I hear Caterpillar just contracted with NASA to supply heavy mining equipment for the Moon

By cricky seems they are


Heavy Construction on the Moon




Caterpillar Inc., a company known for their heavy earth moving machines and the world’s leading manufacturer of construction and mining equipment, is looking to tackle that issue. They’ve partnered with NASA to create technology that could benefit construction and mine workers everywhere in the future,


www.universetoday.com...

Well NORCAT already has the ET Bucket Wheel contract but I guess they need smaller stuff


[edit on 31-8-2008 by zorgon]

[edit on 31-8-2008 by zorgon]



posted on Aug, 31 2008 @ 02:23 PM
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reply to post by NephraTari
 


The only ownership i have in the living moon site is intellectual, at best.

Nephra, i have always appreciated your posting, so don't get me wrong. But it seems that you are being a little obtuse here. You are not being forced to read the site. If you want his backup info, you are being asked to visit the site, as that is where he has it put (in greater presentation).

But that site makes no money for anyone. It costs Zorgon, and he is kind enough to share (for which i am grateful).

I think you are being a little feisty. Perhaps we could get back to the data, and not the person?



posted on Aug, 31 2008 @ 02:27 PM
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reply to post by internos
 


So...sans moisture, what causes the color difference? Is it due to oxidization of the exposed layers?

I agree that it is a landslide...but i am curious as to what drives the color varience.

Also...what kind of oxidizing effect does CO2 have? And if it can oxidize iron, that would leave CO, correct?



posted on Aug, 31 2008 @ 02:32 PM
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reply to post by zorgon
 


the first pic is creepy... looks like something flying with a shadow under it...

yikes



posted on Aug, 31 2008 @ 02:37 PM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 

Hi, bigfatfurrytexan:
a possible explanation, as i've said, is that the difference of the colors of the strikes is given by the tickness of the layer of dust: the older is the streak, the ticker is the layer of dust, and the lighter is the color of the streak, and visa-versa: just my 2 cents
.



[edit on 31/8/2008 by internos]



posted on Aug, 31 2008 @ 02:40 PM
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Originally posted by bigfatfurrytexan
Also...what kind of oxidizing effect does CO2 have? And if it can oxidize iron, that would leave CO, correct?


that just opened a can of worms... Dang You


In our atmosphere we consider 'air' as mostly nitrogen 78.08% and oxygen 20.95% all the rest are trace... while on Mars its mostly CO2

So looking around it seems we are doing a lot of research on the effects of combustion fuel in a CO2 mix...



Intense interest in technologies facilitating the sequestration of CO2 has led to the concept of combining oxygen obtained from an air separation unit with recycled exhaust flue gas containing primarily CO2 to replace air as the oxidizer in coal fired power plants.

aiche.confex.com...


This one is directly related to H2-O2 combustion (rocket fuel) Seems a way to cut down on the need for oxygen in the ratio and use CO2 instead
Does THAT ever have implications

Chemical effects of CO2 addition to oxidizer and fuel streams on flame structure in H2-O2 counterflow diffusion flames


Numerical simulation of CO2 addition effects to fuel and oxidizer streams on flame structure has been conducted with detailed chemistry in H2-O2 diffusion flames of a counterflow configuration. An artificial species, which displaces added CO2 in the fuel- and oxidizer-sides and has the same thermochemical, transport, and radiation properties to that of added CO2, is introduced to extract pure chemical effects in flame structure. Chemical effects due to thermal dissociation of added CO2 causes the reduction flame temperature in addition to some thermal effects. The reason why flame temperature due to chemical effects is larger in cases of CO2 addition to oxidizer stream is well explained though a defined characteristic strain rate. The produced CO is responsible for the reaction, CO2+H=CO+OH and takes its origin from chemical effects due to thermal dissociation. It is also found that the behavior of produced CO mole fraction is closely related to added CO2 mole fraction, maximum H mole fraction and its position, and maximum flame temperature and its position.


www3.interscience.wiley.com...



posted on Aug, 31 2008 @ 02:44 PM
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reply to post by NephraTari
 


OK I will bite,

every post after the first has a little link down the bottom to www.msss.com how hard is it to find the pictures by thier file names. I managed to do it and I not only found them, but lots more.

I feel your time would be better spent helping us all find some answers instead of making these threads nasty.

BTW I think you should change your mood status from Illuminated to PMS.



Great find Zorgon S+F from me.



posted on Aug, 31 2008 @ 02:44 PM
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Originally posted by bigfatfurrytexan
And if it can oxidize iron, that would leave CO, correct?


Seems it can but only at high temperatures, unless radiation over time might do it.. still looking


Kinetics of iron oxidation with CO2 between 1300 and 1450°C
cat.inist.fr...

[edit on 31-8-2008 by zorgon]



posted on Aug, 31 2008 @ 03:04 PM
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First I would like to clear some things.


Originally posted by NephraTari
Thats interesting so are you saying all the banter you have with Armap and Internos is then false because being a part of the site it originated from when they act as though they are seeing these images for the first time and thank you for sharing them... they are really nothing new to them because it has all been documented previously on the site that you all own together?
The only things I own together with other people is what I, my brother and my sisters inherited from my father.

The fact that Zorgon's site has some material published by me on ATS means only that he found it a good addition to his site.

Other members have asked me to use some of my images, it's nothing new or exclusive to Zorgon's site.

The banter may be just because we understand each other while we have different opinions about almost everything related to Mars and Moon photos.

I already knew the photos from the Opening Post (I have seen the detail image that is published for each HiRISE photo in every one of the more than 6000 photos published and I have seen the full photo in more than 1400 cases), so I will not say that I am seeing them for the first time, but if it was something new I would congratulate Zorgon for his find, as I usually do, even when I do not agree with the opinion of the poster.

PS: if I co-owned that site I would not allowed that music and that design.



posted on Aug, 31 2008 @ 03:11 PM
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Originally posted by ArMaP
PS: if I co-owned that site I would not allowed that music and that design.


Everyone's a critic :shk: Maybe I will put a suggestion box on the front page



posted on Aug, 31 2008 @ 03:11 PM
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Originally posted by Peepers
Its abovious there is a wind creating a spectrum of material from the ejection source. It also looks as though the wind blows a constant pattern from the same direction.


Do we have enough data to figure out the approximate time period between the beginning of the eruption and the time the last debris falls?

Admittedly, I don't know what how that info would be useful to me
but I'm curious as to why it appears the wind continuously blows in one direction.

How much does gravity and the thickness of the atmosphere effect the time the debris stays in the 'air'? Could it be that the eruptions create a huge cloud that lingers for a long time, staining the surface, and planetary rotation causes the 'direction' of the marking?



posted on Aug, 31 2008 @ 03:13 PM
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Originally posted by BloodRedSky
Could be ice clouds, or maybe the moon Phobos?


This is the shadow of Phobos.
(found here)

Phobos is too small to make dark shadows, it only makes penumbral shadows.

[edit on 31/8/2008 by ArMaP]



posted on Aug, 31 2008 @ 03:17 PM
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Originally posted by Teratoma
Do we have enough data to figure out the approximate time period between the beginning of the eruption and the time the last debris falls?


Phoenix Lander Weather Station
www.space.gc.ca...

To ArMaP

What's the blue stuff in those craters?




posted on Aug, 31 2008 @ 03:41 PM
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Originally posted by zorgon
What's the blue stuff in those craters?
I don't know, I only know that this image was made with images M04-03241 and M04-03242, corresponding to the red and blue channels, from Mars Global Surveyor.

 

About those "shadows", I think you have photos of four different things.

Slope streaks.


The "geysers", that I am not sure if are really geyser like.


Wind blown dust


Dust devil trails


 

I agree with Internos about the slope streaks, they look like something flowed down hill, being diverted by anything higher than the surrounding ground.

I also agree (and I think that this is what most scientist think) that they were made in different occasions, and the "age" of the streaks is what makes them look less noticeable.

One thing that is not noticeable in your photos is that those slope streak really carve their way down hill. I will try to find an example of that.

PS: the filename of your Gusev images is "NASA_gusev_sm.jpg", shoudn't it be "ESA_gusev_sm.jpg"?



posted on Aug, 31 2008 @ 04:00 PM
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Originally posted by ArMaP
PS: the filename of your Gusev images is "NASA_gusev_sm.jpg", shoudn't it be "ESA_gusev_sm.jpg"?


Yup you are right but that was the file name I found it with and forgot to go track the original file and just noticed there is no info on the page
Thanks for reminding me. It was on an anomay site using it to show plant life with no data

Here is the full size from ESA





Description
This colour picture was taken by the HRSC camera on board ESA's Mars Express, from an altitude of 320 kilometres. It shows the centre of crater Gusev with the landing site of the NASA Spirit rover (marked). Gusev is a crater of 160 kilometres diameter. Earlier in the history of Mars, it appears that this area was covered by water. Because of the probable existence of sediments from this ‘lake’, Gusev is a highly interesting target in the search for traces of water and life on Mars. The area shown measures about 60 kilometres across at the bottom; North is at the top.


www.esa.int...

[edit on 31-8-2008 by zorgon]



posted on Aug, 31 2008 @ 04:07 PM
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reply to post by internos
 


Thank you internos. Yes I can understand that. I would love to have time to take in ALL of the content here and a few other places as well but real life gets restrictive of my time.
Thanks for clearing that up.



posted on Aug, 31 2008 @ 04:16 PM
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In this photo you can see the "geysers".



But when we see them closer they do not look like geysers, they look just like dust blown from a central spot, although that could have been created by a geyser like action.




About the slope streaks, you can see in this image that this one has been very active, with many marks left on that slope, and it's visible that it carved the slope.



Closer we can see that whatever it may be, it affects the surface of that slope.



posted on Aug, 31 2008 @ 04:22 PM
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reply to post by zorgon
 


OMG, Alien Invasion force!!!!!

Either that or possibly a natural phenomenon of some type, AIF more likely though huh?



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