The Master Mason doesn't know squat!

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posted on Jan, 8 2009 @ 06:00 AM
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reply to post by bushidomason
 


Well, that is what I am doing...

You see (as if any one else does), I am not a Mason. I don't belong to a lodge, pay dues, or hold membership in any fraternal or esoteric order.

I have reasons for this, but the first and foremost is the imperative that I retain maximum freedom of movement in the knowledge. It is crucial that this state of affairs is maintained as long as possible. It even drove me to turn down TS clearances.

However, I use the Morals and Dogma as a reference and inspiration. I study the knowledge, and marvel daily at the profound implications of the reality of the Creator. I am blessed to have this opportunity, to search out and discover the deepest truths. And whenever the chance affords itself, I share my findings with those less fortunate. Then my joy is complete, for I have not crossed the circle of the Earth for naught.




posted on Jan, 8 2009 @ 06:23 AM
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I'd like to point out do to the quantity of 33rd degree masons out their, only a very small amount characterize the ruling body of this world. The rest are just sheep like the all of us.



posted on Jan, 8 2009 @ 07:06 AM
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So according to you, one should not say:

Masons rule the world," but rather "Scottish Rite Masons rule the world"?

Why do you think the Scottish rite has more influence than any other Masonic rite?



posted on Jan, 8 2009 @ 09:45 AM
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Originally posted by Saurus
So according to you, one should not say:

Masons rule the world," but rather "Scottish Rite Masons rule the world"?

Why do you think the Scottish rite has more influence than any other Masonic rite?



That brings up an interesting point. Do the different lodges compete against each other? Do some freemasons change allegiances and swap lodges? And if so- why?



posted on Jan, 8 2009 @ 02:23 PM
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reply to post by Mintwithahole.
 

No, the different lodges do not compete against each other, rather they work together on most projects including membership. Some masons change lodges or join multiple Lodges depending on their needs and situations.

As for the Scottish and York Rites some men join one and some join the other for various reason. On the other hand many Masons like myself join both.
I have been fortunate to be able to be active at Lodge, and both York and Scottish Rite.



posted on Jan, 8 2009 @ 02:30 PM
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Originally posted by KYCH/32KCCH
reply to post by Mintwithahole.
 

No, the different lodges do not compete against each other, rather they work together on most projects including membership. Some masons change lodges or join multiple Lodges depending on their needs and situations.

As for the Scottish and York Rites some men join one and some join the other for various reason. On the other hand many Masons like myself join both.
I have been fortunate to be able to be active at Lodge, and both York and Scottish Rite.


It's still a puzzle to me why anyone would join the freemasons. I've heard people saying it's for the brotherhood and companionship but you can get that in your local pub or the gym. I'm sorry to keep going around in circles but I keep getting the feeling there's more to it all. Something which we non masons aren't told about. And before everyone starts throwing insults at me again I'm not saying it's wrong or evil as some have stated, just weird. I suppose it's that weirdness that some conspiracy theorists latch on to.



posted on Jan, 8 2009 @ 02:52 PM
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Originally posted by Mintwithahole.
I've heard people saying it's for the brotherhood and companionship but you can get that in your local pub or the gym.
Well there you have it. I don't hang out at the local pub nor the gym... Masonry gives me that which I choose to not seek elsewhere.



posted on Jan, 8 2009 @ 03:43 PM
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Originally posted by Bl0rg
I'd like to point out do to the quantity of 33rd degree masons out their, only a very small amount characterize the ruling body of this world. The rest are just sheep like the all of us.

That 33rd/32nd degree only has authority in the Scottish Rite. In the Blue Lodge, the main body, the Scottish Rite has no authority or rule. The Master Mason is the highest degree. As a Master Mason you are eligible to rule all bodies.


Originally posted by Mintwithahole.

Originally posted by Saurus
So according to you, one should not say:

Masons rule the world," but rather "Scottish Rite Masons rule the world"?

Why do you think the Scottish rite has more influence than any other Masonic rite?



That brings up an interesting point. Do the different lodges compete against each other? Do some freemasons change allegiances and swap lodges? And if so- why?

You can swap Lodges in some jurisdictions. It's not really competing between the Lodges. I know within my District we work together to bring in members and we all visit each other's Lodges. Sometimes someone changes Lodges because of the meeting night doesn't work with their schedule.

reply to post by KYCH/32KCCH
 

Right now I am just in the York Rite, but once I get some more free time I will join the Scottish Rite.

reply to post by Mintwithahole.
 

The history drew me to it. The brotherhood though was a great by product of it all.



posted on Jan, 8 2009 @ 04:36 PM
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reply to post by Mintwithahole.
 


Brotherhood and companionship is where you chose to find it. I could go to my local pub or the gym for that. But I'm sorry to say that most those people I either have nothing in common with or do not care for their company.
The Masons are SIMILAR to my church family, the difference being that they draw from a broader philosophic and religious base, I have met men there that I would not have met at my church or anywhere else. Yet they are all "moral men" who work for a common goal of building a better society.



posted on Jan, 9 2009 @ 02:11 AM
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Originally posted by Mintwithahole.
That brings up an interesting point. Do the different lodges compete against each other? Do some freemasons change allegiances and swap lodges? And if so- why?


This question is not without merit, and I don't believe the answer to this question is a straightforward "No".

In Europe, there is a (very) large section of Freemasonry, including the Netherlands and Belgium which broke away from 'Regular' freemasonry, and are not accepted by 'regular' freemasonry because historically, they did not comply with ancient landmarks. (In particular, the belief in a living God was not a prerequisite, and the presence of a bible (Sacred Volume) during lodge was not required.)

Membership across these constitutions is forbidden, and in many European countries, as well as African and Asian colonies (or previous colonies) such as South Africa, there is fierce competition between these constitutions.

However, in context of this discussion, there is no competition between side orders of Freemasonry with each other or with craft or blue masonry.



posted on Jan, 9 2009 @ 02:42 AM
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reply to post by Saurus
 


If a group has to break off because they don't follow the landmarks of masonry, are they really masons? Isn't the entire purpose of the landmarks to define what is and what is not freemasonry?

Anyone can choose to take up the name of course, but I'd argue that would be a battle between pseudo-masons and freemasons.



posted on Jan, 9 2009 @ 03:06 AM
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Aah, yes, from our point of view, they are not really Masons.

However, their views on what Freemasonry is all about differ from ours, and from their side, we are all masons. Thus, they will allow regular masons into their lodges, whereas we will not allow cross-visitations or membership.

The question of Landmarks is a difficult point to argue, because historically, we were also accused of breaking from the ancient landmarks:

"In the 1740s there was a growing number of Irishmen in London, many of whom had become Freemasons before leaving Ireland. For reasons now unknown they appear to have had difficulty gaining entrance into Lodges in London, so in 1751 a group of them formed a rival Grand Lodge. They claimed that the premier Grand Lodge had made innovations and had departed from ‘the ancient landmarks’ whereas they claimed to be working ‘according to the old institutions granted by Prince Edwin at York in AD926’. For this reason they became known as the Antients Grand Lodge and referred to their older rival as ‘Moderns’. "
(Source of this paragraph: UGLE Official Website)





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