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Skeletons come out of Masons' closet

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posted on Mar, 18 2004 @ 11:32 AM
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Edition: 1 - All-round Country
Section: Local, pg. 003

VICTORIAN Freemasons have pulled the skeletons from their closets
and turned them over to science.

The handover was part of a national move to phase out the use of real
human bones in secret rituals, said Victorian Masonic administrator
Geoff Becker. ``We're going to plastic ones.'' According to
Mr Becker, contemporary Freemasons believe it's no longer socially
acceptable to keep ``original'' bones. Nor do they want them
inadvertently discovered or handled by non-Freemasons.

``A few years back there was an interstate incident where children
came into a centre and found and handled the bones. That upset the
Masonic community,'' he said.

Already, NSW has disposed of its bones ``appropriately'' and smaller
states and territories are following suit, said NSW grand secretary
Chris Craven.

Mr Becker co-ordinated the collection of skeletons, skulls and thigh-bones
from Masonic centres around Victoria.

He then delivered them to associate professor Chris Briggs of Melbourne
University's Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology.

``It's mostly odds and sods, but surprisingly there were a number
of complete skeletons,'' said Professor Briggs, who confessed he
was ``surprised'' when Mr Becker first contacted him three years
ago.

Today, after assessment and processing, 20 complete skeletons and
about 50 individual bones are housed at the university.

Because Professor Briggs recognised that some of the bones were Aboriginal,
the remainder were sent to Museum Victoria, to be readied
for return to their community.

``We have repatriated 278 and have 205 individuals approved for repatriation,
packed and awaiting collection by community groups,''
said Robin Hirst, director of collections, research and exhibitions
at the museum.

At the university the bones were used as teaching aids for medical,
dental, physiotherapy and science students.

According to Mr Becker, his organisation had no idea where their bones
came from. ``They go back 150-odd years and there's no history
on them,'' Mr Becker claimed. Freemasons use skulls and leg bones
as symbols of mortality in initiation ceremonies such as the
so-called Scottish rite.

Copyright 2003 / The Australian




posted on Mar, 19 2004 @ 07:23 AM
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A few years back there was an interstate incident where children
came into a centre and found and handled the bones. That upset the
Masonic community,'' he said.



Hey, will you re-phrase that please? The children did not "Come" into a Masonic centre, they broke into it and stole paraphernalia from it. Had they broken into your home and stolen a bottle of whisky, the principle would have been exactly the same.

Of course the break-in upset the Masonic community, intrusions like that frequently upset those subjected to them.

Sadly, it seems that these days, crime is only against those with whom most are in agreement. Should it be targeted against those who are not the majority it is almost acceptable.

Those responsible for that break-in were caught, prosecuted and given the slap on the wrist that young crooks get these days. Perhaps if Freemasons were as corrupt and perverted as many people would have us believe, their punishment would have been significantly more severe.



posted on Mar, 19 2004 @ 08:16 AM
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Originally posted by chevin

A few years back there was an interstate incident where children
came into a centre and found and handled the bones. That upset the
Masonic community,'' he said.



Hey, will you re-phrase that please? The children did not "Come" into a Masonic centre, they broke into it and stole paraphernalia from it. Had they broken into your home and stolen a bottle of whisky, the principle would have been exactly the same.

Of course the break-in upset the Masonic community, intrusions like that frequently upset those subjected to them.

Sadly, it seems that these days, crime is only against those with whom most are in agreement. Should it be targeted against those who are not the majority it is almost acceptable.

Those responsible for that break-in were caught, prosecuted and given the slap on the wrist that young crooks get these days. Perhaps if Freemasons were as corrupt and perverted as many people would have us believe, their punishment would have been significantly more severe.

Two things, one, they were CHILDREN.
And if probiblly didn't want to press charges because they didn't want the "spot-light" to be on them.



posted on Mar, 19 2004 @ 08:20 AM
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Wgatenson, come on, this was a crime. Children or not they broke the law. Get over your inherent mistrust in things you do not know about and do your research. Comments like yours are not constructive in the slightest.

Breaking and entering is the same whatever your age, in whatever country you are in.



posted on Mar, 20 2004 @ 03:48 AM
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Originally posted by Wgatenson

Two things, one, they were CHILDREN.
And if probiblly didn't want to press charges because they didn't want the "spot-light" to be on them.


I hope that you will be just as forgiving if some "CHILDREN" break into your home, trash it and make off with some of your possessions. Though somehow, I have a sneaking feeling that would not be the case; and, surprise, surprise, most Freemasons I know would be in agreement with you!



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