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Artists and Art Galleries

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posted on Aug, 29 2008 @ 11:14 PM
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How do Artists get their work into art galleries? Does anyone know?

Most artists aren't lucky enough to be 'discovered' while carrying a piece of art on the street, so how do they get their art on the wall for buyers? Do they approach the gallery with a portfolio? Do they have agents? Do they have to know a gallery owner?




posted on Aug, 30 2008 @ 11:56 AM
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Great question!

I have been a professional artist/designer/craftsman for 25 years.

I have also owned 3 galleries and am now currently on the board of directors of a cooperative gallery. [artist owned and operated]

The way I started was to apply to every quality/juried Arts and Crafts festival in large metropolitan cities, I could find. I would regularly travel across the US, 3 or 4 times a year if accepted to good festivals.

Gallery owners/buyers/directors go to the nicer festivals looking for new, fresh, quality work to include in their stable of artists. Art festivals is invariably where most of my artist included in my galleries came from.

I also used to have graduate student, MFA candidate, shows in my galleries to give them exposure to the art buying public. Quite fancy affairs, with Champagne, catered etc, to attract quality buyers.

Taking your portfolio to galleries is very tough. The director of my galleries used to see sometimes 20 portfolios a week of prospective artists and after awhile she had to say "sorry we aren't accepting any applications"

The art business is very tough and competitive with lots of good, talented young artist, all looking for their slice of the pie.

Good luck sc2099!! U2U me if you need any additional information. It is an honor and a pleasure to help young artist as I was helped when I first started.



posted on Aug, 30 2008 @ 01:09 PM
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reply to post by whaaa
 


Wow, thank you so much for the reply, whaaa!

That's just the kind of reply I was looking for. I was mostly just wondering because I wouldn't consider myself a serious artist. I'm more of a hobbyist. I know it takes real time and dedication to become a pro and I don't think I will be changing careers anytime soon!

Thank you for the info about the art fairs. Perhaps I will dip my toes into the water and apply. I live in Toronto so there are tons of things going on in the area. If I got a positive response I might be looking at a whole new level of seriousness. It can't hurt, right?

I'm so curious, what kind of artist are you? Would you be interested in sharing some of your work?



posted on Aug, 30 2008 @ 02:19 PM
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sc2099, I would expect that such a cosmopolitan city as Toronto would have a myriad of events that you could showcase your work. Try everything, festivals, coop galleries, smaller not quite so established galleries, weekend farmers mkts, etc. Get in contact with your local Chamber of commerce and ask them where to show. Join artist associations, network, surf the www.

Be bold and find a sidewalk space and set out your work. Feedback from
the everyday people is invaluable and don't take criticism to heart.
Just be true to your vision and don't compromise your aesthetic for sales.
Art is process not product.

My careerer has spanned many genres. Street musician, I made sandals,
furniture, apprenticed to a potter, painted landscapes, cut stone for jewelers, made my own silver line of production jewelry, built electric guitars, made silkscreen prints, printed Teeshirts, and had a design studio
making prototypes of stuff for corporations. Now, With my girlfriend, we design a line of very contemporary ladies clothes, manufactured in the Orient and wholesale them to retail shops in the Rocky Mts.

Currently my passion is acting in the films that are being shot all over my state of New Mexico. Eventually I would like to produce and direct an independent film but I have a lot to learn.

I feel blessed to have grown up and lived in an area where art and artist are appreciated. But as Dylan once sang, "The times, they are achangein"



posted on Aug, 31 2008 @ 11:08 AM
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reply to post by whaaa
 


I have another question for you. How do artists copyright their work? If someone is selling their art on the street is it copyrighted? How do they keep people from copying their work?

It sounds like you have had quite an interesting career. I hope I can have even close to that level of excitement. My career is just starting so I have plenty of time to accomplish that. For so long I said I'd be happy doing any job so long as it paid enough, but I was always jealous of people who had a passion in life, for I had none. Then I finally discovered what it was. I only wish I had known and been able to get started sooner.

I think there are a lot of people out there who still appreciate art and artists. Were the good old days really so good? People in general are more educated these days so I would think the appreciation for art would have grown over time if for no other reason. Then again, people probably aren't any smarter even with all that education so I don't know.



posted on Aug, 31 2008 @ 11:53 AM
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Originally posted by sc2099

I have another question for you. How do artists copyright their work? If someone is selling their art on the street is it copyrighted? How do they keep people from copying their work?


I never bothered to copyright my work and I was copied a lot. But I figured that to hire a lawyer and sue a knockoff artist would be to expensive and ultimately more trouble than it was worth. I did threaten to kick the **** out of a couple of people if they continued to knock me off.

You know sc2099, there really were good old days where handmade items were appreciated and people would pay for them. But there is a different consciousness now. The economy has taken a lot of the discretionary money from the middle class and nice inexpensive imports are attractive.
Also there is a lot more competition from great young artist/artisans from
great schools like Penland, RISD, or the California College of arts and crafts.

My advice to good young artist's is to get a solid background in business and marketing along with your art/craft. But most of all be passionate and have fun and live your dream!!



posted on Aug, 31 2008 @ 12:11 PM
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Of course I'm probably talking about another subject.

But I'm guessing 3D art is the future now.

2d art is still great for many things too, character design, covers, posters, all the things possible. But 3D is what can get you an easy job, because of demand, if you get good at it.

I'm just guessing, but I'm learning 3D, and I see more chance of getting a job with that. But I love 2d work too.

So anyone out there think this is true?




[edit on 31-8-2008 by _Phoenix_]



posted on Aug, 31 2008 @ 12:50 PM
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Originally posted by _Phoenix_I'm just guessing, but I'm learning 3D, and I see more chance of getting a job with that. But I love 2d work too.

So anyone out there think this is true?






Well, there certainly is a huge demand for 3D people in the movies.
I sometimes work in a green screen studio and there are armies of
young, hip computer people doing background work, CGI etc.
I worked for Frank Miller [300]and he hires like you wouldn't believe but most of his post production is in LA I think. Watch for me in Franks "The Spirit"

www.themovieblog.com...

I'm just an extra. Only one speaking part so far in a TV pilot.



posted on Aug, 31 2008 @ 01:33 PM
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Originally posted by whaaa


Well, there certainly is a huge demand for 3D people in the movies.
I sometimes work in a green screen studio and there are armies of
young, hip computer people doing background work, CGI etc.
I worked for Frank Miller [300]and he hires like you wouldn't believe but most of his post production is in LA I think. Watch for me in Franks "The Spirit"

www.themovieblog.com...

I'm just an extra. Only one speaking part so far in a TV pilot.

3d is everywhere now, commercials, games, movies, tv shows, posters whatever.

Thanks for the link, I loved Sin City, I hope The spirit is good.

Wow you worked in 300, what kind of work? And what kind are you doing in the spirit?

What do you mean extra?



posted on Aug, 31 2008 @ 07:39 PM
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Originally posted by _Phoenix_


What do you mean extra?


When you go to the movies, see all the people that are in the background,
walking around, shopping, etc. making the movie look like it is real.
Those people are called background extras. People that interact with the stars that have no spoken lines are called featured extras. The people that might have a few words are called principals. They are usually members of the Screen Actors Guild. When the director is setting up a shot they use "standins" instead of the principals or stars.

I'm an extra/standin. Basically human wallpaper. It pays fairly well, easy work, catered breakfast, lunch and dinner. Free snacks and drinks all day.
Long, long days, usually 14 to 16 hrs. Most extras hope to be discovered and asked to speak lines. Seldom happens. I have an acting coach and an agent, hoping to get speaking parts. In "The Spirit" I was a featured extra, cast as an English gentleman and in another scene just a guy in the crowd.

My girl friend works in wardrobe, dressing the extras, principals and stars.

[edit on 31-8-2008 by whaaa]



posted on Aug, 31 2008 @ 11:46 PM
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reply to post by whaaa
 


I thought you meant that, I wasn't sure. I've always wanted to be an actor.
Never tried thou.



posted on Sep, 1 2008 @ 10:06 AM
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Originally posted by _Phoenix_
reply to post by whaaa
 


I thought you meant that, I wasn't sure. I've always wanted to be an actor.
Never tried thou.



It's really quite easy. Go to the Film commission site in your state>bulliten board or Locals>casting calls....

email a headshot and a resume to the project that interest you and/or
go to casting calls/auditions, usually listed in the film commision site.

Or craigslist>TV/Film> gigs>talent, crew etc.

It's fun, you meet interesting people, and basically get paid for hanging out. Being on the film crew pays much better but requires training or serving an internship/apprenticeship with a production company and they are constantly looking for strong young lads and lassies that are willing to work long hours for little pay. Send out a resume listing your 3d skills.

Try it!!

[edit on 1-9-2008 by whaaa]



posted on Sep, 1 2008 @ 11:57 AM
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reply to post by whaaa
 


Hey, thanks for the info!

I will certainly consider it, when I have the time, why not?

Peace.



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