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Toronto Sky Anomalies - 9/11 holograms

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posted on Sep, 5 2008 @ 06:49 PM
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This is a great example of a project in the US militaries FAST TRACK program. There probably won't be anymore 20 years ahead of civilian tech surprises thanks to the new program

www.telegraph.co.uk...




posted on Sep, 5 2008 @ 06:53 PM
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Originally posted by jfj123
Please find any instance where a laser can produce darkness and post it for me.


I think this whole issue was adequately covered in my earlier post. I'm assuming you are from Missouri on this one. I don't have a problem with that.

I showed you a webpage that discussed a new achievement in holography from 2006. I don't think it is far fetched to suggest that the US government is funding secret laser research that is a little further along than what is going on at a university in Japan.


And we're right back where we're started in that you can't create darkness with light.


We're going in circles here. The only visual perception that not created by light is pitch black, which is really the absence of visual perception.

Are there technical difficulties with presenting a flying image of an airplane made of light? Obviously. Can I explain how these difficulties could be overcome? No. Is it unreasonable to assume that there are people working to overcome these difficulties? I really don't think so. Might these difficulties have already been overcome in a secret government research program? I think it's reasonable to think they might have been over come.

Could holograms have been used on 9/11? I don't think it is out of the question, but obviously you do. That's fine. We'll just have to agree to disagree.



Those are wonderful statements and all but are meaningless without any evidence to support them.


I think they are reasonable assumptions given the size of the black budget in the US, the appearance of airplanes like the F-117A, the B-2, laser cannons, scalar weapons, etc.

Obviously the military has had a long standing interest in camoflage and stealth and coincidentally a long standing interest in lasers. Could these interests have coincided at some point? Why not?


[edit on 5-9-2008 by ipsedixit]



posted on Sep, 5 2008 @ 07:00 PM
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reply to post by ipsedixit
 


We still have the same problem that light cannot create darkness. Try the experiment with your flashlight. Blend any colored flashlights you like, flash the blended flashlight into the sky and see if you are able to create a patch of darkness in the daylight sky with your color blended flashlight. Do you think that you should reasonably expect to see a patch of darkness?



posted on Sep, 5 2008 @ 07:40 PM
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reply to post by jfj123
 


I've pretty well said all I have to say on the subject of color and you are repeating yourself.

If you look at a representation of the spectrum and look at the indigo portion of the spectrum, you will see that it appears darker than the other colours. It is still light but to the eye it appears darker than yellow for example.

A tremendous amout of contrast can be obtained by artfully placing dots of color from the spectrum.



[edit on 5-9-2008 by ipsedixit]

[edit on 5-9-2008 by ipsedixit]



posted on Sep, 5 2008 @ 07:50 PM
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Originally posted by ipsedixit
reply to post by jfj123
 


I've pretty well said all I have to say on the subject of color and you are repeating yourself.

If you look at a representation of the spectrum and look at the indigo portion of the spectrum, you will see that it appears darker than the other colours. It is still light but to the eye it appears darker than yellow for example.

A tremendous amout of contrast can be obtained by artfully placing dots of color from the spectrum.



I see what you're saying but what you're missing is the actual projection of darkness on light. I know I'm repeating myself but it seems necessary since you're missing it. I'm not trying to be rude but just try the experiment with the flashlight I suggested and find out for yourself whether or not your conclusion is reasonable.
I believe your sincere and are interested in discussing factual information so I really do encourage you to try the experiment or if you know a physics prof. with knowledge of lasers, ask him/her.



posted on Sep, 5 2008 @ 08:10 PM
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Originally posted by jfj123
I see what you're saying but what you're missing is the actual projection of darkness on light.


I'm saying that "darkness", as you call it, can be suggested very convincingly to the eye by choosing colors from the visible spectrum. This is done all the time in art, on television screens etc.

The trick in a hologram would be to project the appropriate colors in close proximity to one another so that they are perceived as dark.

The main point is already shown. A holographic style image can be projected in air with nothing acting as a screen.

If science is able to achieve the projection of all colors of the visible spectrum in air, then there is no limit to the kind of images they can project. The "darkness" issue is irrelevant.

[edit on 5-9-2008 by ipsedixit]



posted on Sep, 5 2008 @ 08:19 PM
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Originally posted by ipsedixit

Originally posted by jfj123
I see what you're saying but what you're missing is the actual projection of darkness on light.


I'm saying that "darkness", as you call it, can be suggested very convincingly to the eye by choosing colors from the visible spectrum. This is done all the time in art, on television screens etc.

The trick in a hologram would be to project the appropriate colors in close proximity to one another so that they are perceived as dark.

The main point is already shown. A holographic style image can be projected in air with nothing acting as a screen.

If science is able to achieve the projection of all colors of the visible spectrum in air, then there is no limit to the kind of images they can project. The "darkness" issue is irrelevant.

[edit on 5-9-2008 by ipsedixit]


So you're saying that with a flashlight and some colored lenses, you can create a patch of darkness in the middle of the day?

It's not irrelevant at all. Again you're missing the whole point that light cannot produce darkness. Again, use the example of inkjet printers. You'll notice that inkjet printers don't have white ink so they must rely on white paper to produce the white color. Same with the sky as a background. Since light cannot produce darkness, it must rely on the background it is projected onto for it's darkness.



[edit on 5-9-2008 by jfj123]



posted on Sep, 5 2008 @ 08:31 PM
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Originally posted by jfj123
So you're saying that with a flashlight and some colored lenses, you can create a patch of darkness in the middle of the day?


Flashlights are irrelevant here. Remember we are at the stage of utilizing plasmas created by focusing lasers.

If science can create colored plasmas, through whatever means in the full spectrum of visual light, in the process of making their holographic images, then there is no limit to the sort of image they could project.

Virtually all levels of contrast can be achieved within the visual spectrum. Look at the edited spectrum image.



posted on Sep, 5 2008 @ 08:44 PM
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Originally posted by ipsedixit

Originally posted by jfj123
So you're saying that with a flashlight and some colored lenses, you can create a patch of darkness in the middle of the day?


Flashlights are irrelevant here. Remember we are at the stage of utilizing plasmas created by focusing lasers.

If science can create colored plasmas, through whatever means in the full spectrum of visual light, in the process of making their holographic images, then there is no limit to the sort of image they could project.

Well based on photos and videos of he planes, we know they would need to project BLACK which in the case of plasma, lasers, etc.. is the LACK OF LIGHT. How can you use light to create the lack of light.

Trust me on this one or research how these things work so you'll be able to understand my point better.

So to sum up, you cannot use any combination of light to produce a lack of light. You don't have to believe me, ask a physics prof or contact a company that sells lasers.

Seriously, look into it a bit and get back to me. I have a pretty diverse background which gives me a bit of a unique perspective on the 9/11 conspiracies.
Background
Computers
electronics
lasers
holography
optics
Construction
archetectural



posted on Sep, 5 2008 @ 08:52 PM
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reply to post by jfj123
 

There is no doubt that you've got your story and you're sticking to it.

Let me ask you a question. Is it possible for light waves of the same color, but out of phase to cancel each other out? I think so. Would the eye translate that as black? I think so.

Nothing you have said here has lessened my belief that it may be possible to project any image whatever in air, without a screen. Has it been done? I don't know. I don't think anything, in principle, forbids it.



posted on Sep, 5 2008 @ 09:32 PM
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From page 123:

".....
These programs will also explore a combination of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) based electro-optic spatial light modulators in combination with very short pulse solid state lasers to provide powerful new capabilities for secure communication up-links (multi-gigabits per second), aberration free 3-dimensional imaging and targeting at very long ranges (> 1000 kilometers). Lastly, innovative design concepts and system integration of MEMS-based spatial light modulators (SLMs), that provide a quantum leap in wavefront control, photonics and high speed electronics, will be explored for an affordable and high value communications, image sensing and targeting system for use well into the 21st century."



posted on Sep, 6 2008 @ 05:58 AM
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Originally posted by djeminy

From page 123:

".....
These programs will also explore a combination of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) based electro-optic spatial light modulators in combination with very short pulse solid state lasers to provide powerful new capabilities for secure communication up-links (multi-gigabits per second), aberration free 3-dimensional imaging and targeting at very long ranges (> 1000 kilometers). Lastly, innovative design concepts and system integration of MEMS-based spatial light modulators (SLMs), that provide a quantum leap in wavefront control, photonics and high speed electronics, will be explored for an affordable and high value communications, image sensing and targeting system for use well into the 21st century."


excellent now please describe this in laymans terms and in detail.



posted on Sep, 6 2008 @ 10:05 AM
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Originally posted by jfj123

Originally posted by djeminy

From page 123:

".....
These programs will also explore a combination of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) based electro-optic spatial light modulators in combination with very short pulse solid state lasers to provide powerful new capabilities for secure communication up-links (multi-gigabits per second), aberration free 3-dimensional imaging and targeting at very long ranges (> 1000 kilometers). Lastly, innovative design concepts and system integration of MEMS-based spatial light modulators (SLMs), that provide a quantum leap in wavefront control, photonics and high speed electronics, will be explored for an affordable and high value communications, image sensing and targeting system for use well into the 21st century."


excellent now please describe this in laymans terms and in detail.



Sorry, but I haven't got the expertise!

I have no doubt you know more about these things than I ever will!



posted on Sep, 8 2008 @ 07:38 AM
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[edit on 8-9-2008 by SparkOfLife]



posted on Sep, 10 2008 @ 02:05 PM
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I think I figured it out.

We've been putzing around in this forum, trying to prove/disprove that it would be possible to project holographic images in thin air.

It has been shown that it can be done by creating plasmas with focused laser light, but the images so far achieved in public access research are rudimentary and not useful for the purpose of 9/11.

Whether the government in black science projects has gone beyond that stage is a matter for speculation.

However, suppose the goals were a little more modest. Suppose that all that was required was to project an image viewing screen, created by means of these plasmas. This screen could be made in any shape, depending on where you focused the laser array.

Once you have your moveable screen being projected from the interior of a missile or drone, you project the image that you want, through a conventional but specially designed movie projector onto the projected screen, also from within the drone or missile.

This could very well be how it may have been done.

It might also be a factor in video oddities that others are explaining as video tampering, missing wings etc., since the plasma created screen would be to some extent, prey to air movement.

Note: I am not saying that the screen is necessarily made out of the plasma, though it might be. It could also be made out of air affected by the plasma created by the lasers.



[edit on 10-9-2008 by ipsedixit]

[edit on 10-9-2008 by ipsedixit]



posted on Sep, 10 2008 @ 07:35 PM
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Here is a video of an image projected onto what looks like a rising column of steam, or dry ice vapour. There are obvious problems with the image. The question is could the column of steam or dry ice vapour be stabilized in some way, so that wavy pattern didn't appear in the images.



Laser produced plasmas are induced by the ionization of air through which laser light travels. If focused lasers in a fixed array were continually producing small areas of ionized air at the focal point of the lasers, that would amount to a shaped area of ionized air travelling along with the drone which was projecting the laser light.

The ionized air would be negatively charged. If a positively charged medium were continually sprayed into the negatively charged air in amounts that one could project an image on but which would not destroy the ionizing (i.e., negative charge producing) properties of the lasers, then you would have your projection screen on which you could project anything.



posted on Oct, 12 2008 @ 05:11 PM
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Just found out about the HOLOGRAM on 911...it's a hell yes.
and I think we caught a HOLOGRAM rainbow at our myspace site

Go to first set of pics...First it's chemtrails
and then it's our rainbow.

Project BLUEBEAM???? or special Pleadian rainbow.

I'll send the pics to anyone who wants them

look in the middle of the full curve and zoom in TWO distinct dots just like
in 911



posted on Oct, 20 2008 @ 11:50 PM
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Question for the Mods on this thread. someone posted to this thread on "12-10-2008 at 05:11 PM by Anonymous ATS" and I have been waiting with interest to read this posting. I was just wondering if you could maybe get a conference call going between the Defense Department, Darpa, the CIA and NSA and expedite Anonymous ATS's posting, even if it is heavily blacked out.

On my part I will turn myself in immediately to the FBI office in Buffalo. (I'll bring my swimtrunks, since I assume waterboarding is now de rigeur in their reception rooms.)



posted on Oct, 21 2008 @ 04:54 PM
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Here's a 'hologram' type image that was transmitted live across the Tasman Sea from Oz to NZ to demonstrate new Telco technology.

s266.photobucket.com...

The limiting characteristics that were mentioned earlier are all apparent in this demo. Note the dark background and how anything behind the image that isn't dark shows through it quite clearly like the blue illumination at the bottom of the curtain and the hand of the host.

The reason for this is that streams of photons on different trajectories do not interact with each other to any noticable extent. Just look around the room you're in and consider how photons are streaming in every possible direction without interfering with each other. The proof of that is the fact that you can see every object in direct line of sight from any angle as long as photons are interacting with its surface.

Any source of photons eg from a light coloured background like the sky will pass straight through any image composed wholely of light (IE not having any solid opaque matter in it).

The bottom line:
Projection/creation of darkness can not be achieved by using light as the source. In fact there is no way of projecting darkness at all because dark is the absence of light (non reflection/emission of photons). To produce dark it's necessary to absorb all incident photons and prevent any secondary emissions at the same time which is pretty much what a flat black wall does.

There were no hologram planes on 9/11, it was far simpler and more reliable to use real planes - they, at least, exist. Who flew them, how and why is a more realistic line of investigation.



posted on Oct, 21 2008 @ 08:46 PM
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reply to post by Pilgrum
 

Here is an embed of the Aussie news clip.



It is an interesting clip. They don't go into how their image was produced, particularly what it was projected on. That would be interesting to find out.

I don't want to re-argue the thread. I stand by what I have written.

The issue is, really, how to project "dark". Would it be good enough to fake the projection of dark? Could that be done? I think it could. (Perhaps the 9/11 plane impacts could have been done perfectly with holograms at night, thus solving the "dark" problem.)

These are issues that the experts are no doubt working on.

Does anybody in hologram research resign himself to the notion that convincing holographic images are impossible because "dark" can't be projected? I don't think so.

As to what happened, in fact, on 9/11, I don't know.



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