Artificial Photosynthesis Provides Clean Cheap Hydrogen

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posted on Aug, 24 2008 @ 05:51 PM
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www.gizmag.com...

All I can say is this holds great potential and shows that hydrogen production, instead of being a problem might actually be quite easy.

I hope people realise that there is no energy crisis by now, just a knowledge and empowerment crisis.




posted on Aug, 24 2008 @ 07:37 PM
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There's another article here about a discovery made at MIT.


Requiring nothing but abundant, non-toxic natural materials, this discovery could unlock the most potent, carbon-free energy source of all: the sun. "This is the nirvana of what we've been talking about for years," said MIT's Daniel Nocera, the Henry Dreyfus Professor of Energy at MIT and senior author of a paper describing the work in the July 31 issue of Science. "Solar power has always been a limited, far-off solution. Now we can seriously think about solar power as unlimited and soon."

Inspired by the photosynthesis performed by plants, Nocera and Matthew Kanan, a postdoctoral fellow in Nocera's lab, have developed an unprecedented process that will allow the sun's energy to be used to split water into hydrogen and oxygen gases. Later, the oxygen and hydrogen may be recombined inside a fuel cell, creating carbon-free electricity to power your house or your electric car, day or night.

The key component in Nocera and Kanan's new process is a new catalyst that produces oxygen gas from water; another catalyst produces valuable hydrogen gas. The new catalyst consists of cobalt metal, phosphate and an electrode, placed in water. When electricity -- whether from a photovoltaic cell, a wind turbine or any other source -- runs through the electrode, the cobalt and phosphate form a thin film on the electrode, and oxygen gas is produced.

Combined with another catalyst, such as platinum, that can produce hydrogen gas from water, the system can duplicate the water splitting reaction that occurs during photosynthesis. The new catalyst works at room temperature, in neutral pH water, and it's easy to set up, Nocera said. "That's why I know this is going to work. It's so easy to implement," he said.


I honestly think in the next couple of years (or at least within the next decade) we will see some fantastic jumps in "green" technology. The pressure to "get off oil" is pretty big, and if we do that means we'll be able to use it for more productive things instead of burning it for fuel.

[edit on 24-8-2008 by OnionCloud]



posted on Aug, 27 2008 @ 05:03 PM
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What a great post.


This discovery may be the one thing that will cause oil companies to fall flat on their face.

The technology used shouldn't be patented, but distributed to the world's people.

But somehow I can see the utilities and petrolium companies somehow "buying" this technology and supressing it while making it illegal for anyone to build, own or opereate such devices.

Pretty damned sad world isn't it?



posted on Aug, 27 2008 @ 05:22 PM
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What a great post.


This discovery may be the one thing that will cause oil companies to fall flat on their face.

The technology used shouldn't be patented, but distributed to the world's people.

But somehow I can see the utilities and petrolium companies somehow "buying" this technology and supressing it while making it illegal for anyone to build, own or opereate such devices.

Pretty damned sad world isn't it?


Eh, I don't really buy in to all those theories. I mean, we use oil for a lot of things, other than fuel. Plastics, to name on thing. Plastics are huge. I mean, just look at the list of things oil can be used for, it's breathtaking.

With that said, it would hurt them to stop gas production, but I think they'd be able to quickly find other uses for it, if not just offer more of it up to the things we currently use it for, making it cheaper by bulk, but easier to sell because of that.





 
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