Underwater city on Google Earth

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posted on Aug, 24 2008 @ 12:01 PM
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This is kind of fun.I'm normally just a lurker on this board, but people here might have fun with this one. Here's the link where I just found this:

Fresh New Discovery - Can You Guess What This Photo Is?

And here is the Google Earth link: DOWNLOAD LINK




posted on Aug, 24 2008 @ 12:50 PM
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reply to post by beagle17
 


Something like that turned up on a lake near Kansas City, back when Google Maps first had the satellite photos. It's probably archived at Google Sightseeing, but the funny pictures are long gone from Maps. That looked like a circuit board photoshopped into a heavily manipulated image, but people came up with all sorts of loopy ideas in what seemed like a matter of seconds. This one looks like part of an image of a city "buried" in the photo.

I think working for Google is a lot of fun. They have pulled off all sorts of pranks over the years, and they never seem to respond to questions emailed to them about such anomalies. Tracking system? Just some way to gauge the level of attention people pay to what's on Maps? Google is a commercial enterprise, and corporations pay tons of money for data that could be acquired in a more "interesting" way, if you are Google.



posted on Aug, 24 2008 @ 12:56 PM
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delete post plz, my bad

[edit on 24 Aug, 08 by dramafreak]

[edit on 24 Aug, 08 by dramafreak]



posted on Aug, 24 2008 @ 06:34 PM
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Here is the link to the Google Sightseeing page. I had forgotten how long the thread went on, with crazy ideas about the circuitry inside the "satellite" showing up on images, jokes about glitches in the matrix, and my favorite, The Sign of LaForge!

googlesightseeing.com...

The high res photos, beyond a certain zoom level, are taken from aircraft at about 10,000 feet, IIRC. It was interesting to learn about all that stuff. Many of the photos are taken with very expensive Zeiss cameras with all sorts of high tech features, from planes that track a GPS course with amazing precision. The cameras still use film, or at least did in '05, and the giant negatives were scanned. At least that's how I recall from reading about the process. Google must have a huge budget for buying images. They are updated pretty frequently, too. I don't know of any place to find commentary from Google about how it all works, or for that matter from anyone involved. There would be a lot of people, from pilots to photo processors to aircraft owners, and so on.



posted on Aug, 26 2008 @ 12:34 AM
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I don't get how this photo proves that there is anything under the lake. It looks like distortions of the water's surface. How would a photo of a lake surface show an underwater city?



posted on Aug, 27 2008 @ 01:41 PM
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reply to post by beagle17
 


In the google map you can read "2008 Google"
Sorry I don't believe it's an underwater ancient civ.



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