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Ruling protects Arizonan who sells anti-war shirts

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posted on Aug, 21 2008 @ 03:03 AM
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Ruling protects Arizonan who sells anti-war shirts


www.guardian.co.uk

PHOENIX (AP) - A federal judge on Wednesday permanently barred Arizona from using a state law to prosecute an online merchant who sells shirts that list names of thousands of troops killed in Iraq.

U.S. District Judge Neil Wake did not strike down the 2007 law against selling products that use of military casualties' names without families' permission. But he ruled that using the law to prosecute Dan Frazier would violate the Flagstaff man's First Amendment rights because his ``Bush Lied - They Died'' shirts are ``core political speech.''
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Aug, 21 2008 @ 03:03 AM
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I am not so sure about having actual soldiers names on his T-Shirts, whether it is politically inclined or not. I guess Arizona does not think that way, or maybe isn't the state of Arizona but the Judge who doesn't like Bush?

Either way, this should be overruled. What would you do if you had a family member died in the Middle East war and then see your family member's name on someone's T-Shirt?

www.guardian.co.uk
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Aug, 21 2008 @ 03:10 AM
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While I agree with the sentiment that you should really be allowed to print t-shirts with whatever you want on them - I think that I may feel differently if I had a family member who had been killed in action and found their name on a t-shirt.

Then again, I may think that it's good that someone is trying to make a point.

It's a difficult one isn't it?

A 'delicate' area when one thinks long and hard about it.

So, I'm gonna make a decision on the spot and think - why not sell them? It's not as if they're being accused of a crime on the t-shirt is it? If you think about the long term implication of a ruling that says that a t-shirt cannpot say such and such a thing, then what is stop offensive t-shirts being banned? Personally, I like wearing some of t-shirt hells more offensive products and freaking out the middle classes and would not be happy to be told that I can't wear it in case it offends somebody. Lots of things about other people offend me, but I don't ask for them to be banned.

Anyway, kinda rambled a bit, but what's new, eh? I think you gotta think about the long term implications if it was banned.

Peace. MGGG



posted on Aug, 21 2008 @ 03:20 AM
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Believe it or not, I do agree with you, but the thing that complicates everything else is the fact that not all families who have lost their beloved ones in action will have the same thoughts.

Making a point is great but others who do not understand this concept will thing that those making this T-Shirts are doing nothing but offending those families who have lost loved ones.

Again, as you mentioned, this is a delicate topic that needs a careful observation.



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