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Mystery surrounds humming noise

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posted on Aug, 29 2008 @ 06:44 AM
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I haven't heard the exact same 'hum' that I intially did. The noise I heard and tried to record, while a 'hum' could have been someones central heating. (I have to be honest) even though i couldnt isolate it. But I definately heard a 'hum' months ago.




posted on Aug, 30 2008 @ 09:05 AM
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A report of another similar hum in the loch ness area. Local authorities have yet to determine the cause, but I feel it is related.

www.highland-news.co.uk...


strikes me as very odd how similar these two occurances are.

Is it possible that geological activity could be involved? I know we're not a plate boundry here in the UK but what about faults? just throwing it out there.

[edit on 30-8-2008 by Chonx]



posted on Aug, 30 2008 @ 09:53 AM
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reply to post by Chonx
 


nice find Chonx,

thankyou for posting to this thread, i will now have to look into the scottish one as well.

thanks

snoopyuk



posted on Oct, 4 2008 @ 03:50 AM
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reply to post by snoopyuk
 



Its a water pipe problem. I get the same in Leighton Buzzard and its being going on for a year now. I have been researcrhing it for ages. Oddly, the Subury incident is the first time i have ever heard anyone have the same problem.

Basically...

Sometimes the submersible pump at the bottom of a well will shift position in the well shaft, coming into contact with the well casing at the well head, and therefore send motor vibrations up into the house. Or, the delivery tube from the well pump to the well water holding tank could be transmitting motor vibrations into the tank, and, therefore, the house. Since the pump in a well only comes on intermittantly, when the pressure switch calls for it to pump in more water, that could easily be the source of your mysterious hum.

I am actualy convinced this is our conclusion.



posted on Oct, 4 2008 @ 06:14 AM
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I've often wondered whether these hums are akin to 'sick building syndrome', how the design and the architecture of a building (including ventilation for air and moisture) creates certain effects or symptoms.

In some of the cases I've read about this in the past, often this was through incremental change to a building rather a sickly building from the outset (although that appears to have happened too). It might have been a new ventilation shaft here, or new windows there &c that created a tipping point.

It might be that, as towns are developed that they become 'bad' towns in a similar way. Previously, noise might have resonated in ways that weren't particularly noticeable, whereas a small and seemingly insignificant change could perhaps create a circuit of resonance through seemingly unrelated factors. A bit like setting an amp and guitar up with an array of foot pedals. They might all be in place but you're hearing nothing until you plug in that last lead.

[edit on 4-10-2008 by Merriman Weir]



posted on Oct, 5 2008 @ 01:21 AM
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reply to post by Merriman Weir
 


I've worked in HVAC before and currently work as a contractor on a military installation. Most buildings have a natural overpressure inside and in some cases the HVAC is so poorly designed and engineered that the building can be highly overpressured or underpressured. Both can have very bad effects on a building. It is possible that if a structure is overpressurized enough people MIGHT begin to have some kind of phyisological symptoms but most buildings have open windows, open doors, and if the building is actually overpressurized, people are gonna know. The air will be forced out at every opening and whenever you open a door it can swing so violently outward it can knock people and children down (which can injure people pretty badly). Not to mention, people's ears would be popping if the overpressure is bad enough.

I heard of one case on a military base where the overpressure was so bad that the actual PDM layer that sealed the flat roof of one building actually filled up like a giant balloon to a point where the top of the PDM layer was like 12 feet above the actual roof..

It happens.. But people would know about it.

However, IMO, it is possible that poor HVAC combined with traffic, industrial actitivites, construction, or other factors could (in theory) combine to create a very specific audible hum which could be amplified by the structure itself just depending on the aspects of the resulting hum and the overall architecture and condition of the building. But people would realize that link normally.. I work on a military installation in a small building that literally vibrates and hums when a helicopter flies over... If the building's hum is being caused by some kind of external factors though, people are not going to experience it ALL the time unless there are permanent structures or activities nearby that are the true source of the hum. And if it only lasts for a few seconds at a time, people will know that the source is something quite normal.

These hums we have been talking about last for extremely long periods of time with no known source, with continuous audible attributes, and people hear the hum for miles and miles around whether they are inside a building or out.. Low frequency noise is, in my mind, very mysterious and not well understood. It has recently been theorized that ELF noise from the auroras in the upper atmosphere (for example) can actually become amplified by certain kinds of rocks in the earth's crust making the auroras audible.. Again, this is NOT well understood but many people have claimed to have actually "heard" the auroras and many scientists now believe that so many people have come forward with similar stories about this that there must be something to it. My stepdad claims he once could hear high pitched squealing, hissing, and popping directly correllating with changes in the extremely active auroras he saw on one specific evening a few years ago..

Much I've read about ELF, VLF and other frequency ranges associated with sound too low-frequency to be audible by humans is extremely interesting and in some cases very bizarre.. People are constantly recording noises within this low-frequency range that are amplified by the earth, which seem to NOT be associated with any man-made activity, yet the sounds themselves have structure.. Some people actally construct antennaes that stick right in the ground and then wire the antennaes to computers and other equipment to record their data. Many of the man-made sources of ELF/VLF have very specific kinds of structure within the signal and occur on very specific frequencies and wavelengths.

I found a link a few years ago about unknown sources of ELF/VLF noise that really blew me away but I couldn't find it for a very long time. I recently found it and thought I would share with you guys.. It's a gem.. I might have posted this earlier on in the thread, I'm not sure.. I know I've posted it somewhere on ATS I just don't remember where.. Enjoy.

www.vlf.it...

For galleries of unexplained, unknown ELF signals you can also go here:
www.vlf.it...

On the right-hand side are the links to the unexplained signal galleries.

-ChriS





[edit on 5-10-2008 by BlasteR]

[edit on 5-10-2008 by BlasteR]



posted on Oct, 5 2008 @ 02:28 AM
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Originally posted by BlasteR
reply to post by Merriman Weir
 


However, IMO, it is possible that poor HVAC combined with traffic, industrial actitivites, construction, or other factors could (in theory) combine to create a very specific audible hum which could be amplified by the structure itself just depending on the aspects of the resulting hum and the overall architecture and condition of the building.


This is what I was suggest rather than purely ventilation problems. I really mentioned them only because so much of the time people relate sick building syndrome more directly to air ventilation than anything else.

I support the idea that seemingly unrelated things could combine to play a 'holistic' role



These hums we have been talking about last for extremely long periods of time with no known source, with continuous audible attributes, and people hear the hum for miles and miles around whether they are inside a building or out.. Low frequency noise is, in my mind, very mysterious and not well understood. It has recently been theorized that ELF noise from the auroras in the upper atmosphere (for example) can actually become amplified by certain kinds of rocks in the earth's crust making the auroras audible.. Again, this is NOT well understood but many people have claimed to have actually "heard" the auroras and many scientists now believe that so many people have come forward with similar stories about this that there must be something to it. My stepdad claims he once could hear high pitched squealing, hissing, and popping directly correllating with changes in the extremely active auroras he saw on one specific evening a few years ago..


I don't dismiss any of this. As I said, I think there are multiple linked causes to this. I don't think it's a specific, single, isolated thing that is often suggested. I think it's a case of one thing acting on another then another, which creates the chain in my poor analogy of a guitar-pedals-amplifier set up. I think it just takes one 'extra' thing to complete some kind of circuit and those circuits aren't necessarily of things that would seem to go together. That 'extra' thing, when isolated has no significance but it's when it's placed in that circuit that it all comes together.



posted on Oct, 11 2008 @ 04:07 PM
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Found this website that's all about the humming noise. He reckons it's caused by gravitational waves




The results of experiments carried out over the past year have confirmed that the Hum is caused by gravitational waves. These waves are generated by the high voltage electrical grid supply interacting with the charged particles of the Earth's ionosphere.
The interaction takes place at a height of about 250 miles which allows the waves to cover a very large area. Reports obtained from Hum sufferers show the effects must reach a distance of at least 50 miles from the pylons, and probably much further. No increase in Hum level has been observed in close proximity to the pylons and on any given day, the Hum intensity is the same over 100's of square miles.

The effects of gravitational waves on the human body is unknown, the only information available is that collected from Hum sufferers themselves.
The first and most obvious effects is the perception of noise which is the result of the gravitational waves interacting with the body's own gravity detector, namely, the inner ear. Because of this connection to the inner ear, some of the symptoms such as nausea, headaches, hot and cold flushes, are akin to travel sickness, while other symptoms such as tingling muscles, heart palpitation and memory loss show that a very complicated interaction is taking place, probably involving the bodies own immune cells

Tests show the gravity waves pass through metal unaffected and this now reveals the reason why all attempts to block the Hum with metal screens and Faraday cages have failed.
The history of the Hum in the UK coincides with the expansion and upgrading of the National Grid system which now conveys electricity at 400Kvolts.
The variations in Hum level give a clue to its origin, for it has been observed over many years that the Hum level has a propensity to increase during the early hours, at weekends, and times of national holiday, all times when the load on the grid is reduced, that is when the electric current is at a minimum and the voltage is at a maximum

It must be clearly understood that the Hum is NOT a noise in the normal sense of the word, it is a perceived sound generated inside the head of the sufferer. Only a small percentage of people can actually "hear" the Hum but the cause undoubtedly effects the population at large
Most sufferers start to hear the Hum at about the age of 50 with a two thirds majority of women. This is clearly the result of changes taking place in the body for the presence of the Hum has been established on a national scale for some forty years.

Still needing explanation is, why the gravity waves increase in intensity upon passing through a building, particularly through the roof, and why the shape of the roof and ground on which the building stands is of such importance.


homepages.tesco.net...



posted on Oct, 17 2008 @ 02:52 AM
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reply to post by Quazga
 


I really do not think that the HUM is caused by the Wind Farms but I am convinced that sooner or later they will get all the blame for it.

Tweakie.



posted on Oct, 17 2008 @ 03:08 AM
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It is called by gravitational waves, the Earth has a natural hum of its own and in some places its stronger/weaker and can be heard by humans in some weird circumstances, this is one of them.



posted on Oct, 17 2008 @ 03:12 AM
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reply to post by beefeater
 


The frequency seems to be centered on 56 Hz but it is a complex waveform, not just a simple sine wave. It does not appear to be a pressure wave as such, and to my knowledge, no one has yet succeeded in recording it. I have, however, produced a digital approximation of the HUM so that people that have not heard it can at least understand what others are hearing. This can be downloaded or played from the following link. To hear the sound correctly, switch on your speakers and turn the volume fully down then raise the volume level until the sound can just be perceived.

www.cooperman.talktalk.net...

Tweakie.




[edit on 17-10-2008 by Tweakie]

[edit on 17-10-2008 by Tweakie]



posted on Oct, 17 2008 @ 08:35 AM
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For the last couple of nights, this hum has been unbearable. At most I've probably managed about two hours sleep. I'm willing to accept a natural explanation, but having said that I personally think that in my case the hum isn't natural. The reason I say this is, because if it's natural then why does it mainly only occur at night and usually around the same time and in some cases the hum isn't repetitive but it actually changes and becomes more intense. On Wednesday night it started around 2.50am and continued until 5.30am and last night it started at 2.30am and didn't stop until 7.00am. During these time periods I just couldn't sleep at all. I could literally feel myself being bombarded by sound waves, that made all the muscles in my lower body twitch constantly. It's so bad, my bed is literally vibrating. This may sound funny to some people, but not being able to sleep is hell, especially when it's being going on for well over a year.


Interesting but inconclusive article about the hum phenomenon

explorationscience.org...



There are an increasing number of individuals who experience nocturnal disturbances, the regular occurrence of which is sufficiently powerful to remove them from deepest sleep. This growing population of nocturnal risers neither suffer from the physical symptoms normally associated with the aging process, nor are among those unfortunates afflicted with clinical insomnia. In many cases, the victims of the malady are quite young and otherwise in complete positive health. So insidious is this social manifestation, that many are stimulated into fantastic speculations. Nevertheless, we perceive an ever increasing population of new HUM victims whose numbers grow daily.

Conspiratist writers have associated the HUM with military projects such as SANGUINE, or HAARP; concluding the insomnia to be a test of psychotronic weaponry on the national population. Such symbols of the subconscious national fear might have too long worked their way into the hearts of the susceptible, were it not for the simplest kind of evidence concerning the HUM. Curiosity and the need to know far exceed any orthodox standards, filters, or approvals. The absence of extensive measuring tools does not preclude us from making our assessments on an overwhelming phenomenon which academia continues to ignore and deny. Gleaned from the few writings and from numerous dialogues with qualified observers, we are free to share our own subjective consortium of data on the HUM.

But what is the "HUM", and what are its effects? What causes the HUM, and why has it seemed so very impossible a phenomenon to objectify? Are there means by which to obtain hard evidence of the effect at all? Can we indeed discover those connective touchpoints between our subjective experience of the HUM and its true sources in the external world? Is there a measurable continuum between our innermost experience and the outermost world? These are hard and straightforward questions demanding equally hard answers. The HUM effect is indeed a "phenomenon-extraordinaire". The HUM is a subjective experience, a deep and permeating tone which comes in pulsations. But it finds connectivity in an external stimulus, one which has not successfully been found by most researchers.


Hi tweakie, welcome to ATS. I might be wrong, but I don't think you can upload sound files. You can probably use an external website as a link though. For example you can embed youtube links. Checkout the following link which shows you how to do it.

www.abovetopsecret.com...


[edit on 17-10-2008 by kindred]



posted on Oct, 17 2008 @ 09:09 AM
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reply to post by kindred
 


Many thanks, I have added an external link.

Tweakie.



posted on Oct, 17 2008 @ 09:21 AM
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Thanks tweakie. I just listened to the file. Yep that's it, that's the noise I'm hearing. For me it's not always the same though. Sometimes the volume increases or decreases and the noise truly becomes unbearable when the repetition increases, so that it sound more like a pulsing noise, rather than a hum. Interesting.
So I take it, you must also be able to hear this annoying hum then. Do you have an idea what's actually causing it?



posted on Oct, 17 2008 @ 09:35 AM
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reply to post by snoopyuk
 

Please excuse me if this has already been suggested. With the ability these days to tunnel under and cave thru... I genuinly believe there are underground installations using diesel generators for power. Some used for storge...others used or occupied by military personel. As for the sound being less audible during the daytime, it is possible that the average, usual daytime noises that occur simply mask the lower resonance of the diesel generators.



posted on Oct, 17 2008 @ 09:43 AM
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reply to post by Tweakie
 


Wow...this is the sound I heard when I saw a UFO.
I heard the sound first and it got louder the closer it got till I looked out the window and there it was.
Wow..man that brings back some erie feelings.



posted on Oct, 17 2008 @ 10:11 AM
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Could it be a Mosquito box, these little boxes let of a high pitch tone that only people under 25 can here.

I don't no what the range of these are. It may have malfunctioned and this is what is causing the noise.

Its only an idea but is it possible.

Do you have these in your area SnoopyUk.

There are some in my area and its a sickening noise.



posted on Oct, 17 2008 @ 10:42 AM
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reply to post by kindred
 


So far I have done quite a bit of research into this but I still have no idea at all what is causing it.
I perceive the hum at night when there is low background noise but it is not loud and I have to really concentrate hard to distinguish it.
It's still a mystery to me.


Tweakie.

[edit on 17-10-2008 by Tweakie]



posted on Oct, 17 2008 @ 11:34 AM
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reply to post by BlasteR
 


Hi BlasteR,

That sounds like a pretty good explanation to me.


Tweakie.



posted on Oct, 17 2008 @ 01:12 PM
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Originally posted by Quazga
I bet you this is caused by windfarms
Are there any nearby?


This could be an explanation, especially if the wind pushed the sound in the right direction.



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