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Born in Blood - review and discussion?

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posted on Aug, 19 2008 @ 09:54 AM
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So, I just finished reading Born in Blood , which is yet another attempt to make a link between the Templars and Freemasonry. Having just read The Hiram Key, I confess that I wasn't very optimistic about the outcome. But the author, John J. Robinson, surprised me a little.

If you've read The Hiram Key, then much of the content of Blood will be familiar. In fact, if you drop the whole "secret Egyptian king-making rite" theme, you'll have half of the content of Blood. But that's exactly what impressed me about the book; it doesn't seem quite as given to flights of pure fancy.

The author begins by exploring the conviction that Freemasonry has something to do with guilds of stone workers. He points out that the basic philosophy of Freemasonry (in particular, it's Universalism as it relates to religion), is antithetical to the standard of guilds. In addition, he points out that the Old Charges (more on that shortly) make no sense for a guild.

He then examines the Old Charges and makes some assertions. He says that the provision that religion and politics not be discussed makes sense if you are a group of formerly deeply religious men whose faith has just turned on you for political reasons. You may all be in a different place in your relationship to the Church ("Pope Clement V is a vile man" vs. "All Popes are agents of evil.") But if you are going to survive, you need to band together not splinter apart. The elaborate secret recognition signs (which I won't discuss), show both their origin in a time prior to hand guns and a means of identifying yourself to your Brothers in different circumstances. The requirement of not sleeping with a sister or wife of a Brother is essential to maintaining a safe-house system. The very word lodge suggests lodging, which suggests a safe-house which, in turn, as the most secure location available would be the natural meeting place.

He examines history to make an argument concerning the rise of Freemasonry in Scotland and England as being further evidence of Templar connections. Basically, England and Scotland were two places slow to suppress the Templars and give them ample warning to set up a system.

He argues that the "mason" cover was simply a means of providing a set of symbols and code for discussion so that overheard conversations would appear innocuous. In time, having forgotten its own origin, Freemasonry added much more stone-worker jargon and symbolism to its ritual.

He discusses the Legend of the Third Degree as a thinly veiled allegory concerning the betrayal of the Templars by the Pope, the King of France, and the Hospitlars.

He goes on to show evidence of a group that was hostile to all three (or various parts thereof) throughout a period of history between the Templars and the formation of the Grand Lodge of London in 1717.

Anyone have any opinions?

I found it provocative if not fully persuasive.

[edit on 19-8-2008 by driley]




posted on Aug, 19 2008 @ 10:46 AM
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This sounds pretty interesting.

I read two of the Hiram Key books and I think the authors were making a lot of real stretches with the logic.

They would use things like a certain word sounding like another word in a different language, etc, etc, and then claim PROOF without really giving any reference.



posted on Aug, 19 2008 @ 11:04 AM
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Originally posted by emsed1
They would use things like a certain word sounding like another word in a different language, etc, etc, and then claim PROOF without really giving any reference.


There is some of that in Blood, too, as he looks at the words "unique" to Freemasonry. But he restricts himself to looking at the modern word and then trying to figure out if it could be a corruption of something that would have been from Medieval French, which was the working language of the Templars. (In contrast to most religious orders which used Latin for formal documents, the Templars actually revised their Rule and kept it in French.)



[edit on 19-8-2008 by driley]



posted on Aug, 19 2008 @ 09:45 PM
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reply to post by driley
 

I enjoyed BiB. The author presented some interesting theories, and in a context that made me say 'Hmmm'. I am not necessarily convinced, but thinking. I found THK a slower read, and frankly, the best parts were lifted from BiB.



posted on Oct, 6 2009 @ 09:39 AM
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Anyone else have opinions on this?

I'm about half way through 'Born in Blood'.

I'd really be interested to hear some of our resident Freemasons comment on this?



posted on Oct, 6 2009 @ 10:34 AM
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reply to post by FuZe7
 

It has been many years since I read BIB, I still have my copy. I thought the aurthor did a very good job of asking questions, but might have taken a few leaps of faith on his conclustions. He did how ever convince me that there is a lot of lost history. Hopfully someone will be able to ucover some more of it. I think that he uncovered enough to keep the cirtics from totally poo pooinng the Templar / Mason connections. This has been a long held legion of masonry and like all legions there is a cornel of truth. Any way its a good read.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 09:31 PM
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Originally posted by lost in the midwest
reply to post by FuZe7
 

It has been many years since I read BIB, I still have my copy. I thought the aurthor did a very good job of asking questions, but might have taken a few leaps of faith on his conclustions. He did how ever convince me that there is a lot of lost history. Hopfully someone will be able to ucover some more of it. I think that he uncovered enough to keep the cirtics from totally poo pooinng the Templar / Mason connections. This has been a long held legion of masonry and like all legions there is a cornel of truth. Any way its a good read.


Cool, thank you very much for the input!



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