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No Child Left Behind Act : Military Recruiting Information

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posted on Aug, 16 2008 @ 03:08 AM
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Did you know that there is a little know provision in the No Child Left Behind Act that leaves a loophole open for Military Recruiters to requests the following?


The No Child Left Behind Act requires that schools distribute the name, home phone number and address of every student enrolled to military recruiters, unless the student (or the student's parent) specifically opts out.


I submitted this to the Military and Government Projects Forum, because it's linked directly to the military through recruiters, who can request this information, and contact you, and or your children via the school your children attend.

I was reading one of Jim Marrs's books, of ATS's very own The View From Marrs, called The Terror Conspiracy: Deception, 9/11 and the Loss of Liberty.

No Child Left Behind : YouTube


The process is left open for you to be able to opt out of the Military Recruiters having access to your child's information, but it's not something broadcast.

No Child Left Behind : YouTube


Barack Obama : No Child Left Behind : YouTube


Hillary Clinton : No Child Left Behind : YouTube


John McCain : Education and Charter Schools : YouTube


You can opt out, of course, but then again, this isn't the only place where you and your children's information is collected.

The World-Wide Web of Surveillance of Your Online/Offline Activities




posted on Aug, 16 2008 @ 03:30 AM
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Of course the No Child Left Behind Act was already controversial enough, for them to write in the Military Recruiting provisions means that your information is collected and handed directly to the recruiters whenever they request it.

This means that if you are not home, and your child was to answer the phone, a recruiter could communicate directly with your child.

Does anyone other than me think this is a good idea?

I don't have children yet, but I know I have a problem with it.



posted on Aug, 16 2008 @ 03:41 AM
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How odd that military has a provision for the No Child Left Behind Act, where information can be passed on to recruiters.

Will Bush Revoke/Re-Write The 22nd Amendment, To Hold A 3rd Term In Office?

Is this a part of the plan through foreknowledge of a soon to be broiling War in Iran?

Think about it people, if you know a war is going to happen, you know you need soldiers.

The best place to recruit them, apparently, according to Bush, is in your child's school.



posted on Aug, 16 2008 @ 04:22 AM
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Anyone wanting to opt their children out of this travesty can find the necessary forms right here.

I have several years before mine is old enough for the database, but I think I'll get a head start



posted on Aug, 16 2008 @ 04:27 AM
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Originally posted by anachryon
Anyone wanting to opt their children out of this travesty can find the necessary forms right here.

I have several years before mine is old enough for the database, but I think I'll get a head start


Awesome. Thanks so much for that. I wouldn't have known where to find that.

There's a lot of other information databases though, which is troubling.



posted on Aug, 16 2008 @ 04:29 AM
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WOW, i had no idea about this. America needs to take a time out and needs to focus on what really matters, OUR COUNTRY and the future of it. how could something like this get passed in the 1st place?? Democracy my ass.



posted on Aug, 16 2008 @ 04:34 AM
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reply to post by anti us gov
 


This shows foreknowledge of the impending War in Iran, after the War in Iraq moves us on, not necessarily pulling us out either.

Bush knows the U.S. will need more soldiers blood for the Iran War.

Apparently, slipping in that bit within the law was something so insignificant to Bush, he forgot to tell the American citizens.

[edit on 16-8-2008 by SpartanKingLeonidas]



posted on Aug, 16 2008 @ 07:25 AM
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Originally posted by anachryon
Anyone wanting to opt their children out of this travesty can find the necessary forms right here.

I have several years before mine is old enough for the database, but I think I'll get a head start


The problem here is that this is not the only database.

The World-Wide Web of Surveillance of Your Online/Offline Activities

The No Child Left Behind Act, however is the only one directly linked to your children.

Anyone know of any more?



posted on Aug, 16 2008 @ 10:48 AM
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Yes I would have a problem with such a thing. Peer pressure is hard enough, like when a friend has signed up and puts pressure on his friends. I had to spend some time explaining to the kids what war was, and show them videos so they naturally decided their friend was on his own. Anyone soliciting volunteerism on that level from my children in my absense would be facing a very righteous and angry parent who would take them to whatever level necessary to expose this tactic.



posted on Aug, 16 2008 @ 11:09 AM
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I really don't see what the fuss is about. I teach at a high school and we have military recruiters come on campus every year. Just like the college recruiters do. Not every kid is going to go to college and joining the military is an option for some. We have ROTC and the kids that are in it, like it. The recruiters are probably getting the contact info for kids that they've already talked to on campus, who have shown an interest in the military. I highly doubt they are cold-calling the entire school directory. It's obvious that the recruiting methods haven't been working all that great anyway, when the Army is making video games to try and recruit now. Ultimately, I wouldn't worry about your kids until someone decides to bring the draft back.



posted on Aug, 16 2008 @ 03:13 PM
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Originally posted by Evil Genius
I really don't see what the fuss is about. I teach at a high school and we have military recruiters come on campus every year. Just like the college recruiters do. Not every kid is going to go to college and joining the military is an option for some. We have ROTC and the kids that are in it, like it. The recruiters are probably getting the contact info for kids that they've already talked to on campus, who have shown an interest in the military. I highly doubt they are cold-calling the entire school directory. It's obvious that the recruiting methods haven't been working all that great anyway, when the Army is making video games to try and recruit now. Ultimately, I wouldn't worry about your kids until someone decides to bring the draft back.


The problem with this law is that it does not state the age limitations that a recruiter can request information on the children for.

It would be one thing if it stated between age 16-18, and that's it.

It's one thing altogether however when there are no restrictions, and we have the Iraq War going, the impending Iran War, plus we're mixed up with assisting Georgia against Russia, our former Cold War nemesis, plus the War on Terror.



posted on Aug, 16 2008 @ 03:25 PM
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reply to post by SpartanKingLeonidas
 


I'm trying to figure out how not have a restriction on age limit is a key factor in this discussion. Do you honestly believe recruiters are going to waste their time talking up a 3rd grader? If all these different military situations do escalate, they aren't going to need 3rd graders, they are going to need young men who just turned 18. That's why they recruit the high school level. Recruiting anything other than that is just a waste of their time, at least in the event of an immediate need of service.



posted on Aug, 17 2008 @ 01:28 AM
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This is a very good way to get the undereducated class of kids we've been creating since the 80's. They will be little capable of anything other than military recruitment.

No wonder it's there...Can't keep filling up prisons...But there is always a war to be fought.



posted on Aug, 21 2008 @ 01:08 AM
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My husband was a Marine recruiter 2001-2004.........It's amazing how many of these kids couldn't pass the test that is required to enlist. It is getting harder and harder for these recruiters to make mission (quota) each month. Recruiters have always been allowed to get a list each year of all juniors and seniors so that is nothing new. I am very proud of how my husband handled himself while on recruiting duty. At 18 my husband walked into the recruiting office and enlisted even giving up a scholarship to a major university. Now nearing retirement my husband has no regrets. He has visited some amazing countries.... Australia, Europe, Africa, even spent time in Bosnia and is now currently in Fallujah. Our kids have lived in amazing places and experienced wonderful cultures. It was devastating for my kids to move back to the states. They couldn't get over how commercialized everything was and how different the kids are. Most can't fathom how difficult it is for some of these kids in other countries. I have a son that has entertained the idea of joining the military after college. Do I want this life for him? I am not sure but when the recruiters start calling next year I won't be afraid to politely tell them to please not call my home again and if my son decides to join the military he won't need to hear a sales pitch. He will join if he feels convicted to do so. Did you know that these recruiters go to school to learn how to be salesmen. It is a shame!!! If they don't make mission each month they are made to feel like worthless losers. The saying for recruiters is "zero to hero ". They start off each month with a quota and have to meet that by the end of the month or face severe consequences. I know I have gone on a rant but please remember to be respectful to these recruiters they are doing the job they are assigned to do.



posted on Aug, 21 2008 @ 12:16 PM
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Originally posted by projectvxn
This is a very good way to get the undereducated class of kids we've been creating since the 80's. They will be little capable of anything other than military recruitment.

No wonder it's there...Can't keep filling up prisons...But there is always a war to be fought.


This statement is a classic example of people assuming that the only people who join the military are uneducated schlubs who can't get into college and are too slow to make it in the commercial world.

The military has it's standards, you know. They don't take just anybody. And who do you think are running a submarine's nuclear reactor? Gang bangers from East LA? Or operating are repairing F-22 combat avionics? Hick farmers from East Muleshoe, IA? Or how about the maintaining the gas turbine engines in an M1-A1? Drop-outs and delinquents?

While there are lots of roles for all kinds of people, including undereducated and economically-challenged people, the military is a vast organization comprised of millions of people of varying skills and education. And for the vast majority of us veterans, we leave the service better off then when we entered.

And in my opinion, if you are too afraid of your 17 or 18 year old child to talk to a professional military recruiter because they may do something stupid or be coerced or be deceived, then you haven't done a good enough job raising your child. Recruiters have been calling and mailing students since before I was in HS (early 1980's) and it is nothing new. The only thing that is new is that all the Moonbats are crying about their poor defenseless little kiddies and how the big, evil military recruiters are trying to Shanghai the little innocents, to the point where some towns and cities have created an environment that is hostile to recruiters, or even trying to outlaw the activity. Well, thats fine. Just be prepared to not get your share of the federal money if you don't want to be part of the system. Sheesh.



posted on Aug, 21 2008 @ 12:55 PM
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reply to post by Evil Genius
 



Originally posted by Evil Genius:
I highly doubt they are cold-calling the entire school directory.


I don't know about the entire school directory, but when I was in my senior year of high school - this is going back to the fall of 2001/spring of 2002, the first full school year after NCLB was enacted - I was contacted at home by recruiters for the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force. All of these services had sent recruiting representatives to my high school, but I never met or spoke with any of them. As I recall my friends were all contacted, too - again, regardless of whether any of them had previously met with a recruiting representative or not.

I didn't really have a problem with them contacting me at home - I had no interest in serving in the military and had no problem politely informing the recruiters that I didn't think the military was for me.

The recruiters - with one exception - were likewise polite with me and left me alone after I said I wasn't interested. The gentleman calling from the Marine Corps didn't really get the hint and kept pestering me off and on for a few weeks, but it wasn't that big a deal.

I have to agree with Pyros - any one who is 17 or 18 years old should be perfectly capable of dealing with a simple telephone conversation with a recruiter. If your kid can't do that, you haven't done your job as a parent.



posted on Aug, 21 2008 @ 06:43 PM
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Originally posted by projectvxn
This is a very good way to get the undereducated class of kids we've been creating since the 80's. They will be little capable of anything other than military recruitment.

No wonder it's there...Can't keep filling up prisons...But there is always a war to be fought.
You and everyone who thinks like you make me sick. It's that"uneducated class" that's are protecting your self righteous butt.



posted on Aug, 23 2008 @ 12:03 AM
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When i was in high school (graduated 2001), we had to take the ASVAB test. anyone who did relatively well on the test the recruiters went after rather aggressively. i can remember marine recruiters calling me constantly trying to set up an appointment to come to my house to tell me all about how awesome it would be to be a marine.

fast forward 7 years, and im a college graduate that still joined the army... go figure...

the point being that this was before the no child left behind act, so the recruiters are doing the same thing now that they have before, only now there's legislation that says that they can do it.



posted on Aug, 25 2008 @ 03:21 PM
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reply to post by MegaBears
 


do you honestly believe yourself?

people from all walks of life join the military, regardless of where they grew up or how rich their parents are. granted, more people that dont have alot of options join the military. its all a choice that every person takes. a friend of mine from highschool, who is a judges son, joined the marines right out of school. his parents could have afforded all of his college expenses and wouldnt have felt their wallets lighten.
we are protected by people who are at the bottom, to people who are at the top of the ladder



posted on Aug, 25 2008 @ 10:53 PM
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It is an interesting point that recruiters will not waste their time by talking to 3rd graders. However, because there is no age limit, what's stopping savvy recruiters from casually talking to middle school students? I would think that by talking to them when they are young and more susceptible to persuasion (and not mature enough to make wise, reasonable decisions), recruiters would be giving them a future positive subconscious bias towards joining.

A comparison might be how most parents are strongly against tobacco advertising towards youth. By convincing the younger generation that smoking is "cool," you are subconsciously persuading a generation to smoke. I would imagine that if a recruiter came and talked to me a few times when I was in middle school as a "friend" and told me how exciting and patriotic it was, I'd be much more likely to be in the military now.

I just don't think they should even be allowed to target younger children, despite whether they actually do or not.




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