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The tri-lobed Egyptian bowl

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posted on Jul, 30 2008 @ 04:18 PM
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reply to post by RuneSpider
 


I dont see how you could read into my post that I was knocking modern sculptors??

All I said was "those guys could carve", not making any reference to anyone elses skills.

Sure modern artists are good, they should be, the art has had thousands of years to advance and refine.

There arent many modern sculptors that would be able to carve a piece, such as the the one bowl with the rim, given the tools available to the ancient artist.
The modern artist's technique is rooted in his modern tools, and a modern sculptor has to re-learn the techniques that would be effective using stone as a cutting tool medium, the early bowls were carved before copper was in widespread use.




posted on Jul, 31 2008 @ 12:04 AM
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In the second link it talks about the unusual properities of the material used.

It may be that this was a superlative working medium.



posted on Jul, 31 2008 @ 02:01 AM
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reply to post by punkinworks
 


Sorry mate, i'm used to seeing people kind of knock what people can do today. people still use the tools the ancients used, or similar tools, to make things just as the ancients did.
So it's kind of a peeve of mine, and I kind of thought i picked that up inyour post. My bad, but I still think it's as much the matierial and skill. Personally, even with the best tools available short of CAD/CAm, I'd make a bunch of pebbles.



posted on Jul, 31 2008 @ 02:49 AM
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it is an ancient version of the snacdaddy
check it




posted on Jul, 31 2008 @ 03:05 PM
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I have it on good authority that the ancient Egyptian weren't into wings, instead they liked necks and gizzards. Most popular where those covered with "Cheops" sauce made out of - well you don't want to know.



posted on Aug, 25 2008 @ 11:13 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 

i have made several fiberglass models of this bowl,i placed a shaft into the central boss. i then connected a battery powered drill to the other end of the shaft, then submerged bowl into bathtub full of water,turned on drill @ low speed.omg. beautiful hydrodynamic pattern. the bowl sucks water in from center around the boss and expells the water @ a higher velocity on the outer rim.i have also spun the bowl in my lathe and introduced smoke @ its center, i can clealy see whats happening. i have shown friends this and all agree that the bowl is sucking from its center and throwing out on its outer edge. this bowl is an engineering item not a religous artifact. in engineering terms this is an impeller eg pump. the item in the cairo museum is a stone model only, not an actual working item.i believe that the working item would be made from copper or bronze to handel the load. what is missing though is the housing that the impeller would have been housed in. this is my results based on practical work that any body can do for themselves, this is not theory. tgh 26.08.08.



posted on Sep, 15 2008 @ 01:33 AM
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hello to all reading. i am a newbie, please exscuse my style. i would like to share my personal experiance with the tri-lobed schist bowl. i made a scale model from fiber-glass,mounted a length of all-thread into the central boseof said disc. the other end of all-thread went into the battery powered drill. i could spin the bowl in a controlled manner. i filled the bath with water and spun the setup in the water. OMG beautiful hydrodyamic pattern-sucking in from the center,throwing out from the circumference- in engineering terms THIS IS AN IMPELLER...eg..water pump... low rpm. what is missing is the housing,no big deal,the impeller is still the smoking gun. we can make a housing to suit. i then spun said item in the lathe while burning incense to visually show me and others the fluid flow patterns. clear as crystal. sucking in from the center-throwing out from circumference. in engineering water and air are treated as a fluid. my modest work in the bathroom and backshed has shown to me that the tri-lobeb schist bowl is an engineering item and not a religious item. i have been to the cairo museum, the schist bowl is a model to copy, eg bronze or copper. stone cannot handel the shock loads at this thin diamentsion. i hope that those interrested in this topic find my resuslts constructive.



posted on Sep, 15 2008 @ 11:41 AM
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reply to post by tri-lobe
 


Howdy Tri-lobe

Could you show us a picture of the version you made and a video of it in action? Would you care to speculate on why this was in a tomb?



posted on Sep, 15 2008 @ 01:37 PM
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I agree with tri-lobe's post. The item in that photograph looks very much like an impeller. Anyone with an aquarium should recognize it as such.



posted on Nov, 30 2008 @ 08:24 PM
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Could this be part of a tool that makes rope? Three bundles of fiber,one in each hole ,twisted as the stone or a center post is turned . The form of the three "blades" follows that of a fairlead to the center.



posted on Dec, 1 2008 @ 12:48 AM
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The wheel has to be spun around for the purpose to be revealed.

:-)



posted on Dec, 1 2008 @ 02:28 AM
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Originally posted by Hanslune

Another object that resembles the tri-lobed bowl is a clay snakes figurine from the Nagada II period (Petrie c1974, Fig. 9, UC15361). The object consists of a round disk with four snakes, in which three are represented as raised heads (possibly cobras) orientated at 120 degrees around a central, round-shaped vessel with a fourth snake appearing to drink from it, and three horn-shaped indentations around the periphery. The three raised snakes each has an extra eye on their backs made of ostrich eggshell.



End quote

[edit on 29/7/08 by Hanslune]


Actually, these snakes look more like dolphins with their roundish heads and eyes. Their mouths appear less 'reptile' to have fangs. Those alleged 'fourth eyes' located on the backs could be their blowholes. I know there are no flippers to be seen but I do wonder about the 'right flipper', which appears to have broken off from the 'snake' on the left side of this photo.


[edit on 2008-12-01 by pikypiky]



posted on Dec, 31 2009 @ 09:10 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Hello Hanslune
I apologize for delay in responding, I've had two home moves since last post.
I will speculate as to why this was found in the tomb of Prince Sabu. I would venture to say that this item mean't something of importance to him. Why was it placed beside his coffin? and not around the walls with other mundane funeral items as in Emery's sketch. Is this like as in other graves where a man is buried with his favourite weapons, tools, horse or dog? This item was very dear to him.
This is not a standard funeral item otherwise we would have examples of exactly the same from other tombs - and we don't. This is not a temple oil lamp as proposed by William Kayes, becasue if it was we would have other examples of exactly the same item - and we dont. Williams Kayes the Engineer is clutching at burning staws.
You don't need the circumferencial band for an oil lamp. One does not need a raised central hub for an oil lamp. The Egyptian tradesman would not have wasted time and effort on unnecssary work.
The circumferencial band stops expansion and distortion on the outside diameter when spinning and the raised central hub stops item from radially wobbling on shaft while spinning. Both are required particularly when under load.
Once again IMO I will state that this is not a regilious or ornemental item, but is a practical representation of a working device, the metasiltstone item is an example of metal eg: copper or bronze.
Show this to an Engineer with experience in fluid dynamics to clarify. I did and it was most educational.



posted on Dec, 31 2009 @ 10:15 PM
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reply to post by tri-lobe
 


hello hanslune, I have photos in my ATS photo album but I dont know how to upload to this thread yet.



posted on Jan, 1 2010 @ 06:34 AM
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reply to post by tri-lobe-1
 





posted on Jan, 1 2010 @ 06:37 AM
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reply to post by tri-lobe-1
 





posted on Jan, 1 2010 @ 06:39 AM
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reply to post by tri-lobe-1
 





posted on Jan, 1 2010 @ 06:41 AM
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reply to post by tri-lobe-1
 





posted on Jan, 1 2010 @ 08:23 AM
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reply to post by tri-lobe-1
 



Maybe the impeller was designed the person who was in the tomb and that is why it was with him.



posted on Jan, 1 2010 @ 08:40 AM
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It always interesting to see odd shapes and stuff from ancient times..

The first thought that came to me was that the object is maybe a propeller, not the kind fixed on an airplane motor but the one that does its work in water.

Later I read the post of Tri-lobe and it seems he is onto something here I think. The shape this thing is made must have some specific function I guess.

It is very exciting to know that there is so very much to be discovered in Egypt. If only this Hawass person was willing to start excepting good ideas and outside help.

My 0.002 cents..





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