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Predynastic Human Presence Discovered By Core Drilling At The Northern Nile Delta Coast, Egypt

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posted on Jul, 25 2008 @ 09:58 AM
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A small and lucky find



www.sciencedaily.com...
A small but significant find made during a geological survey provides evidence of the oldest human presence yet discovered along the northernmost margin of Egypt's Nile delta.....This long, thin object, formed of dolomite,(a stone tool) ...fortuitous find documents an early human presence in the mid-Holocene wetlands along the delta's paleocoast, a sector where traditional excavation and augering are normally incapable of reaching zones of ancient human activity now at considerable subsurface depths.


Radiocarbon analysis of plant-rich matter in the mud surrounding the object provides a date of 3350 to 3020 B.C., the late Predynastic period....The fragile object lay buried at a depth of 7.5 meters in dark mud deposited in a brackish lagoon setting close to a marsh.


So it was 23 feet under the silt of the Nile river. Indeed a lucky find.


(added link & external source tags)


[edit on 25-7-2008 by Jbird]




posted on Jul, 25 2008 @ 03:16 PM
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One shot in a million, and they find it by accident. Wild.
You got a link to the article?



posted on Jul, 25 2008 @ 10:08 PM
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Howdy Rune

i cleverly hide the link in the quote line . Here it is again

www.sciencedaily.com...



posted on Jul, 25 2008 @ 10:23 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Thanks, the most amazing thing to me is how it shows the changes the land has gone through since the fellow (or gal) dropped the artifact. Kind of the opposite of some of the places I've been here in Florida where the Limestone is on the surface, places that are now under water were once places people walked through.



posted on Jul, 25 2008 @ 10:33 PM
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reply to post by RuneSpider
 


It does make finding neolithic sites in the delta problematic. With sandy mud it is utterly horrible to try and dig thru for stratigraphy.

That and the high water table. I went to some digs near Damietta. Tough job.

[edit on 25/7/08 by Hanslune]



posted on Jul, 25 2008 @ 11:18 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


The good thing, at least from my understanding, is that such areas are great in terms of preservation.



posted on Jul, 26 2008 @ 11:26 AM
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However they will remain well preserved as they are very expensive to dig.



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