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Organic food industry could face downturn

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posted on Jul, 17 2008 @ 01:18 PM
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Organic food industry could face downturn


www.msnbc.msn.com

To stretch their food dollars, people are changing the way they shop. For some, that means buying fewer organic products or taking them off the shopping list entirely.

(visit the link for the full news article)



Related AboveTopSecret.com Discussion Threads:
"Let Them Eat Cake!"




posted on Jul, 17 2008 @ 01:18 PM
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This may not seem so conspiratorial at first glance, but please superimpose this news with my work presented in the linked related thread. Expect an increase in obesity now, as well as a decrease in general health, decrease in worker productivity, higher medical costs, etc.

www.msnbc.msn.com
(visit the link for the full news article)

www.abovetopsecret.com...

[edit on 7/17/0808 by jackinthebox]



posted on Jul, 17 2008 @ 01:23 PM
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What is hurting the industry is the shady deals made by the USDA.

People are becoming wise to the fact that once they (USDA)grace the product the consumer can count on no more than 40% organic.



posted on Jul, 17 2008 @ 01:30 PM
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When 'they' can't put chemicals in you it pisses 'them' off.

Personally, it's not a cost issue other than the meats.

Peace



posted on Jul, 17 2008 @ 01:30 PM
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It was hardly affordable to buy organic before. Now people's disposable income for such things that most would view as a luxury is not so disposable. The other day I was at the store and the organic cucumbers were $5 each. For that price I can buy 5 regular cucumbers. The choice is clear.

I understand that it costs more to produce organic food, but until farmers find a way to bring that cost down they won't be making very much money.



posted on Jul, 17 2008 @ 01:45 PM
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It is definitely time to start growing your own food. Start off with easy yet expensive stuff like herbs, and move up. Urban places even condos can be used to produce a surprising amount of food, just look up 'urban permaculture' on the web. Of course, avoid GM seeds wherever possible.



posted on Jul, 17 2008 @ 05:29 PM
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reply to post by Shar_Chi
 



It seems more folks realize the benefits of good wholesome organic food, but it is so expensive, and like was stated 5.00 for one cuc? The only people who can afford to eat that way are rich. I am wondering if that is not part of the plan?

I also agree that one must try to avoid GMO, but that is a daunting task, as it is not labeled. That really make me mad!~

I agree growing your own food can help, but some people cannot do that. It will require a shift in people's views. Education will help.

I have tried to limit my choice to known "safe food". That helps, keeps things simple (and boring) but I would rather consume less chemicals & gmo food than eat variety of unsafe foods.

just a few comments



posted on Jul, 17 2008 @ 09:35 PM
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reply to post by jackinthebox
 

The high cost of organic vegetables may also force many people to start planting gardens again. Once people start planting real gardens with heirloom seeds, then the companies which run factory farms will fail and the inbredelites dream of controling the food supply of the world will come to an end. During the middle ages in Europe people grew their own vegetables to the point vegetables were not a part of the economy. It will be hard for the inbredelites to outlaw home gardens.


MBF

posted on Jul, 17 2008 @ 11:43 PM
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Originally posted by sc2099


I understand that it costs more to produce organic food, but until farmers find a way to bring that cost down they won't be making very much money.


You can't blame the farmers for the prices, we don't set them. You would be very surprised at the difference between what the farmer gets paid and the prices in the stores.



posted on Jul, 17 2008 @ 11:50 PM
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Originally posted by MBF

Originally posted by sc2099


I understand that it costs more to produce organic food, but until farmers find a way to bring that cost down they won't be making very much money.


You can't blame the farmers for the prices, we don't set them. You would be very surprised at the difference between what the farmer gets paid and the prices in the stores.


You're right. My apologies. I know that farmers get paid pennies a pound for most produce, and margins are razor thin as it is except in the corn/ethanol market. I thought that the high price of organic produce largely stemmed from losing so many to pests and the labor intensive effort of keeping weeds at bay without weed killer. Am I too far off?



posted on Jul, 18 2008 @ 12:00 AM
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I think you will start seeing the price gap between oragnic and non organic start to shrink a bit. Much of the price increase for fruits and vegtebles is due to increased chemical prices. This does not affect organic as much as non-organic.

There is also a bigger profit margin for organic produce. if they start to get squeezed they have the flexibility to lower prices more than non-organic produce.

I also own shares in one of the largest organic producers in North America - Sunopta. They said in their last adress to investors that they are still seeing nice growth in all their organic businesses.

In summary I think your hypothesis is as wrong as the oil shortage hypothesis. Their are oil tankers floating around the oceans with no where to unload there oil. Everyone is flat out full of oil.



posted on Jul, 18 2008 @ 12:37 AM
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That's fine. Instead of buying food that meed ridiculous, anti-industrial requirements, people will get more efficient food that's generally just as good.

Just the market at work here.


MBF

posted on Jul, 18 2008 @ 01:01 AM
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Originally posted by sc2099


You're right. My apologies. I know that farmers get paid pennies a pound for most produce, and margins are razor thin as it is except in the corn/ethanol market. I thought that the high price of organic produce largely stemmed from losing so many to pests and the labor intensive effort of keeping weeds at bay without weed killer. Am I too far off?


You are correct. The last time that I grew produce, I grew squash. I sold it for $1.75 for a 30lb box. That is less than $.06/lb. How much do you pay for a pound of squash in the store at the absolute cheapest? One year I had 3 semi truck loads of watermelons stolen from me that I could prove. We farmers get the shaft constantly.



posted on Jul, 18 2008 @ 05:44 AM
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Organic food is just like any of the other food that is more expensive due to what or hasn't been done do it . People simply are increasing buying more budget brands at the Supermarket because of rising food costs . Budget brand foods tends to lean on the simpler and more economic side of things . I can attest to this because my trolley is always full of budge brand foods .

Another factor is that with vegetable gardens making a come back there is less demand for products such as organic vegetables . How far the trend back towards the basics goes depends on how far the global economy slides and how high living costs . Powered milk may become more common and the likes of bottled water may disappear . Hell hear in New Zealand soft drink is cheaper then milk is .



posted on Jul, 18 2008 @ 03:14 PM
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reply to post by sc2099
 



You're right. My apologies. I know that farmers get paid pennies a pound for most produce, and margins are razor thin as it is except in the corn/ethanol market. I thought that the high price of organic produce largely stemmed from losing so many to pests and the labor intensive effort of keeping weeds at bay without weed killer. Am I too far off?


I believe it is "scale" that drives prices of organic foods up faster than other produce. I like to compare a smallish buyers co-op in the southeast like IGA - Independent Grocers Association - to a food giant, Kroger’s. When an IGA store orders toilet tissue for example, or paper towels, he may order a half trailer load from a local warehouse. Kroger OTOH, can call Scott Paper Company and buy several 80 car trainloads of paper product, perhaps running the entire Scott plant 100% for a couple weeks.

Likewise when Kroger’s buy fresh corn, they buy it by the half train load. They may employ 200 (subcontracted undocumented?) workers to get the freshly harvested corn ready to go out to their 3,000 stores. Working 24/7.

It’s the same problem the small town merchant faced 30 - 40 years ago when Wal-Mart came to town. As the writer explained neither he nor I can afford to pay $5 for a cuke when I can buy another for $1. Yes, given a NO PENALTY choice, I’d pick the organic every time. Note however, that another poster above has noted that the USDA seal of approval may be mostly RETRO and not much PROSPECTIVE.

Inconvenient Truth.
That’s the Reagan Revolution in action. Get rid of the regulators that are holding back the free market entrepreneur. Get government off your back! You can’t have it both ways. Either you have enough food inspectors to inspect your food or you get e.coli, or you play like it isn't so.



posted on Jul, 18 2008 @ 04:14 PM
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reply to post by eradown
 



The high cost of organic vegetables may also force many people to start planting gardens again.


I think most people should, and even would like to. But why don't they? The system has us boxed in and working ninety hours a week.



It will be hard for the inbredelites to outlaw home gardens.


They plan to...


Codex Alimentarius (Mandate That Will Starve 3 Billion People to be In Place by 12/31/09)



posted on Jul, 18 2008 @ 04:19 PM
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reply to post by disgustedbyhumanity
 



In summary I think your hypothesis is as wrong as the oil shortage hypothesis. Their are oil tankers floating around the oceans with no where to unload there oil. Everyone is flat out full of oil.


The oil "shortage" is engineered by global profiteers, and is a part of a much bigger plan.


Revelations of Big Oil Chaplain Lindsey Williams...You Pay National Debt at the Pump



posted on Jul, 18 2008 @ 04:47 PM
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reply to post by jackinthebox
 

I am someone who never gardened before in my life. I now have a garden that is thriving. Buy this book " All New Square Foot Gardening" by Mel Bartholomew. My garden was created in a few weekends.Because I got a late start most of my weekends in early and late spring were devoted to gardening. However if I had begun building the Garden last fall ,I could have easily had a more elaborate garden by spending only about 40 minutes per week on the garden.

In fall and winter when weather becomes cooler, people using the square foot method should build the boxes and fill them with good soils. If they have animals, they should also build the enclosures for the boxes.This would not take up much time per week. For now people should buy seeds off ebay from long time home gardeners(very unlikely to use GM seeds) or start collecting heirloom seeds. With a little planning a good home garden or container garden for arpartment dwellers is possible.


I don't take lightly how the inbredelites have manipulated the FDA into poisoning the citizens of this country with bad foods ,but Codex Alimentarius will not prevent dandilions one of the healthiest most nutrious weeds around from growing. With more and more people becoming educated and angry, Codex Alimentarius will be put down like a rabid dog.



[edit on 18-7-2008 by eradown]



posted on Jul, 18 2008 @ 05:01 PM
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reply to post by eradown
 



Codex Alimentarius will be put down like a rabid dog.


I certainly hope so.

And I certainly like the idea that you went ahead and took up some gardening. More people should.

But that still doesn't change the fact that people are so busy, so tired, and so overworked that they don't even take the time to prepare a descent meal, or even go grocery shopping, much less do any gardening. When you have parents raising their kids on hot-pockets and taco-bell, you are a looong way from the garden.

Then take someone like myself. I work seven days a week, and I am homeless. Now, the last time I was homeless, I did actually throw some seeds around in some out of the way places, but they either didn't come up, got raided, or I had to move on. Now, I do the raiding. Not of private gardens usually, but I do sneak into orchards at night sometimes when I am hungry. Used to be more around. I also keep an eye out for things like wildberries along the highways and such.



posted on Jul, 18 2008 @ 05:20 PM
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reply to post by jackinthebox
 
Go to a library and look at books identifying the edible plants and medicinal plants which grow wildly in your area. A cup of dandilions are actually more nutritious than a cup of spinache. If you can become good at identifying useful wild plants in your area there maybe a way to market them think of florists and those who work with healing herbs.You are temporarily homeless, things always change.



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