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Cavemen and their relatives in the same village after 3,000 years

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posted on Jul, 16 2008 @ 12:08 AM
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The cave, the Lichtensteinhöhle, is made up of five interlocked natural chambers. It stayed hidden from view until 1980 and was not researched properly until 1993. The archaeologist Stefan Flindt found 40 skeletons along with what appeared to be cult objects. It was a mystery: Bronze Age man was usually buried in a field. Different theories were considered. Perhaps some of the bodies had been offered as human sacrifice, or one generation had been eaten by another.





The bones of history

— The oldest human genetic material is thought to have been discovered at the Sterkfontein Caves near Johannesburg in 2001

— Fossilised faeces found in Oregon this year contained DNA dating back 14,000 years, placing people genetically similar to Native Americans in the area 1,000 years earlier than previously thought

— Australian scientists announced in 2001 that they had extracted DNA from the country’s oldest human skeleton, 60,000-year-old Mungo Man, who is distinct from the line that previously suggested all modern humans traced back to Africa




posted on Jul, 16 2008 @ 12:12 AM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Very Interesting indeed. Hopefully they have some more information in the near future. Good post.



posted on Jul, 16 2008 @ 01:09 AM
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Bravo to the OP. Great post! I really look forward to hearing more about this.

Back where we're from (in the old country) the dug this bloke up out of the turf/peat who was hundreds of years old (or was it thousands) anyway my cousins who are there participated in the genetic study done there and found themselves related to the man. Pretty wild when it turns out to be your own kin.



posted on Jul, 16 2008 @ 10:37 AM
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It shows how stable humans populations are - a percentage of the people always seem to stay in the area, while a small percentage move on - the wanderers.

Unless you get a group like the Mongols, Assyrians and Bantu who tended to wipe out all the locals. Most invaders/new arrivals blend in only a few replace.

I haven't seen the study for awhile but I suspect that the Basques are descendents of the first HSS to move into Europe.

Added note: Perhaps someone with more knowledge opn them can confirm or disagree about the Bantu?

[edit on 16/7/08 by Hanslune]



posted on Jul, 16 2008 @ 12:05 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Great find and I hope they learn more about the cavemen clan. I heard one skeptic on TV claim the DNA found in the waste matter sank down from a fresher source! I think they will need more proof to convince everyone that people were in the Americas a lot earlier than previously thought (as I believe).



posted on Jul, 16 2008 @ 12:11 PM
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One always needs more proof for about everything. Once you get undeniable proof you get denialists who deny it!

Fortunately some concepts are beyond denial, few try to claim that Rome, Misr or Sumer actually didn't exist!



posted on Jul, 16 2008 @ 12:15 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Hanslune, you have the most interesting posts! I would think finding any type of evidence that could be dated and tested for DNA would at least spark interest. I am glad there are enough archeologists out there to stick their necks out and at least examine the evidence. (Some even risk tenure and grant money, which is a shame.)



posted on Jul, 16 2008 @ 12:20 PM
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Those guys in the village can really fill history's breath on their neck!!!
I really like your posts and i wish i had something to add (except for a little rant about the assumptions made that cannot be proved - maybe it was a group of stone-age tourists that got lost and so survived for so long due to its tastiest members) but sadly, i do not.

However i wonder what is HSS? I searched for Basques and hss but got only US ship?? and Croatian political party. My only bet is homo sapience settlers but i fail to understand the point then.
Anyway, thank you, and PLEASE keep posting those things.



posted on Jul, 16 2008 @ 12:20 PM
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One of the bizarre myths to come out of fringe archaeological thought is that real archaeologist live in some weird world where finding new stuff is "dangerous".

It isn't, to get famous you need to find something new, better or more interesting. The people who get grants, tenure and book deals are those who find new stuff.




(Some even risk tenure and grant money, which is a shame.)


I don't think you understand the concept of tenure. Once you have tenure you are protected from outside "influences" and can do pretty much what you like.

Only if you go completely dada do you get sent off to pasture before your time.



posted on Jul, 16 2008 @ 12:26 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


I should have stated getting tenure or retaining tenure (which is in some university contracts). I also should have stated ideas, not finds. Every museum loves finds and would like to get their hands on it. If you have an idea before you find something that backs it up is what I meant.
I also try to add to the posts and hope to contribute positively to the debate/discussion of whatever the topic is.



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