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the word is "SKEPTIC" not "SCEPTIC"

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posted on Jul, 14 2008 @ 11:49 PM
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There is no doubt whatsoever that Simon Gray started this website.

The facts, though, are that the preponderance of members/visitors are Americans.

I say let both skeptic and sceptic suffice, depending on the location of the poster.

As a Dutch-born Canadian myself, I can't decide which is the correct form.

sceptisch, Skeptic or sceptic?



just kidding, y'all.




posted on Jul, 14 2008 @ 11:55 PM
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reply to post by masqua
 


Well obviously. There are thousands more Americans with computers who have time to waste on silly nonsense.

But again don't take me too seriously on this pretty stupid thread.

I'm English, I was taught in school and grew up spelling it sceptic. Why should I change it to lower myself to the American bastardiSed version of MY language because there's more of you slobs than us?




posted on Jul, 15 2008 @ 12:26 AM
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You say tomato I say tomato....

Doesn't seem to have quite the same impact in writing...Don't mind me...



posted on Jul, 15 2008 @ 12:38 AM
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Originally posted by ANOK
Why should I change it to lower myself to the American bastardiSed version of MY language because there's more of you slobs than us?





I suppose you missed the part where I said I was Dutch-born and emigrated to Canada.

BTW... it's not YOUR language... it belongs to the Germanic tribes who invaded and over-ran a fair-siZed chunk of the Isles and drove those wild poetic and Gaelic-tongued people into Ireland and Scotland.

Och... how soon they forget. Schaam!



posted on Jul, 15 2008 @ 01:13 AM
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Well I prefer diplomacy - lol So I use both C and K to spell the word Sk/ceptic - but I honestly do not understand how anyone could confuse the word Sceptic with Septic ??? The C is not silent in Sceptic ???? ‘C’ often sounds like “K” ie Do we say "School" or do we say “ Shool “
This Link might help



posted on Jul, 15 2008 @ 01:21 AM
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Originally posted by masqua
reply to post by ANOK
 



If it's truly British and NOT English, then why isn't the language here Gaelic?



Actually, if it's British then it ought to all be in Welsh (P Celtic)


In which case, we should be spelling the word sgeptig


(or possibly using the older Welsh word amheuwr which means the same thing.



posted on Jul, 15 2008 @ 01:24 AM
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This is SpeakerofTruth, like I said, language is an odd thing. I have noticed that some people spell certain words one way, and I spell them another.


For example, some spell the word gray as "grey." To me, "grey" is a misspelling of the word.



posted on Jul, 15 2008 @ 01:39 AM
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reply to post by Fathom
 


Please please please shut up...

www.thefreedictionary.com...


After having said that, once America can pinpoint a 3rd world country corretly on a map, once they don't think that Denmark is the capital in Sweden, then we can start caring about your freaking grammar in a language which by the way is NOT the most spoken language in the world, but actually only no. 3, succeeded by Chinese and Spanish.

Non-best regards from a Dane in London, I have zero respect for spell-plates.



posted on Jul, 15 2008 @ 02:14 AM
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reply to post by masqua
 


Yeah so you keep saying. The modern English language is Germanic based but was still unique to England. The English language takes words from Scandinavian languages, French, Celts, Greek, Hindi, Latin and a few others, but the spelling was again unique to the Englisc (now English) language.

The modern version of English came about in the 16th century and at that time one of the most important contributions to MY language was the word sCeptic and it's correct spelling with a C.

But the most dominant part of my language that has survived is Anglo Saxon of old English (which they borrowed the alphabet from the Britons who used Latin, as they didn't read or write and had no alphabet of their own, and thus we use the Latin alphabet). What we kept from the Germanic was not spelling but the use of verbs, and the use of past and present tenses, as well as other forms of grammar. Oh and the use of the word sCeptic...



posted on Jul, 15 2008 @ 02:23 AM
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Originally posted by Essan
Actually, if it's British then it ought to all be in Welsh (P Celtic)


Actually the Britons spoke Latin, if that is what you are both referring to?

And sCeptic is actually a Latin word, so once again it's the correct spelling...



And yes it's a hard C that sounds like a K, which seems to be how the Americans came up with their spelling, from the way they think it sounded.



posted on Jul, 15 2008 @ 02:53 AM
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I thought Sceptic was a wrong spelling from careless people, now I know better.

Now tell me, is "grammer" instead or "grammar" a correct word? That one does look moronic.



posted on Jul, 15 2008 @ 03:07 AM
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reply to post by Halicarnassus
 


Grammar is the correct spelling, Grammer is the common misspelling of Grammar.



posted on Jul, 15 2008 @ 03:12 AM
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Any which way you look at it the english language is all messed up.
Look at th word GHOTI
Who can tell me what this means and its correct spelling?



posted on Jul, 15 2008 @ 03:31 AM
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Well, to be completely technical about it, it is in fact originally spelled with a K. Seeing that the word comes from the Greek word meaning "skeptikos" which translates to "look about, consider, observe". It was thus the English that bastardiSed the word to sceptic, and then the Americans bastardiZed it further (back?) to Skeptic. (It should be "skeptik" if you really want to be a purist.)


The word sceptic comes from the Greek word skepsis meaning "enquiry". In the context of ancient Greek philosophy it was used to describe someone who sought knowledge but failed to find it. Thus it describes someone engaged on an enterprise, the search for knowledge, rather than a body of doctrine, and begins in this rather limited sense as a practical concept.
Source



As for skeptic (sceptic in British English), the Skeptics were also a group of Greek philosophers, their leader being Pyrrho of Elis. The word skeptic comes from Greek skeptikos "look about, consider, observe". It is descended from the base *skep-, which was related to *skop-, source of English scope, and *skep- may be a reversed version of *spek-, from which English gets spectator, speculate, etc. Greek skeptikos was applied to Pyrrho's school of philosophy, which stressed the importance of careful scrutiny of any proposition, using doubt, before accepting that proposition. The word entered English in the 16th century, via Latin scepticus and French sceptique, with a wider meaning of "initial doubt".
Source


But seeing that I'm not Greek and find myself on what used to be a British colony, I'll stick to Sceptic.



[edit on 15-7-2008 by Gemwolf]



posted on Jul, 15 2008 @ 03:31 AM
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I use the spelling theatre. Because I like it better. Is that Englich? j/k I hate, hate, our language and its confundrums. So we Americans use our own slang just for fun. You can spell tomatoe or tomato. why?? grey and gray. why? I use the term Oldskool. Because it is a twist on the classic just to make a point. Then there are spelling errors and typos. which are different. Some of us just aren't good typists, but can spell fine.



posted on Jul, 15 2008 @ 03:33 AM
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reply to post by VIKINGANT
 


Goatee???

its a short groomed to the chin beard and mustache.



posted on Jul, 15 2008 @ 03:34 AM
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the letter C is pretty useless, considering we have a S and a K. (Konsidering we have a S and a K)



posted on Jul, 15 2008 @ 03:42 AM
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Originally posted by seagrass
the letter C is pretty useless, considering we have a S and a K. (Konsidering we have a S and a K)


Exactly. In Afrikaans we have about 10 words that containts the letter C. (There are more but they're names like China, Christian, etc.). And there are 0 words with the letter Q in them... Now, there's something to think about, while you're considering the use of C, K et al.



posted on Jul, 15 2008 @ 03:47 AM
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Hee hee hee. What was the word? Aaardvark? No no no that wasn't it. Scoal? No no no. Septic? No. Secratic. No. Skeptic? Oh ya that's it. And by the by get your teeth fixed and get your filthy ape British hands off me.

Total gest. You gave us Elvis. No...the beatles...quite right.
Benny Hill and and the Kinks.
Rock on you guys and gals.
Amy Winehouse needs a hug you know.
I know she's a tad icky
Suck it up.

Gemwolf, you are truly a gem.

Ouch! Incarnated! Some serious bad karma there. It would be good if you lighten up a tad.

[edit on 7/15/2008 by jpm1602]

[edit on 7/15/2008 by jpm1602]

[edit on 7/15/2008 by jpm1602]



posted on Jul, 15 2008 @ 03:47 AM
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reply to post by Gemwolf
 


LOL I stand corrected. Latin, Greek, what's the difference anyway...lol



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