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Science Breakthrough. Internet 100x faster - at no extra cost.

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posted on Jul, 9 2008 @ 12:09 PM
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Science Breakthrough. Internet 100x faster - at no extra cost.


www.news.com.au

COMPUTER users frustrated by slow internet connections could soon be surfing the web 100 times faster, all thanks to new Australian technology.

University of Sydney scientists say they have developed a new technology that could speed up the internet - and not cost users an extra cent.

Described as "a small scratch on a piece of glass'', the university's photonic integrated circuit boosts the performance of traditional optic fibres, Professor Ben Eggleton said.

"This circuit uses the 'scratch' as a guide or a switching a path for information - kind of like when trains are switched from one track to another - except this switch takes one picosecond to change tracks,'' Prof Eggleton said of the technology developed over the past four years.

"This means that in one second the switch is turning on and off about one million times.''
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jul, 9 2008 @ 12:09 PM
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WOW!

Here's to wishing this see's the light of day in mainstream society. Internet 100X faster at no extra cost? Sounds too good to be true.




www.news.com.au
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jul, 9 2008 @ 12:13 PM
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Hmmm 'switches'

what?! hahaha!

So what's going to make the internet faster? Better way of moving information around like QoS? I think they're wrong, depending on the bandwidth that the internet service provider delivers and also the way it's delivered this isn't much help if the use of hardware isn't on both sides. You also want to consider that bandwidth throttling is done depending on what service is provided.



posted on Jul, 9 2008 @ 12:33 PM
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reply to post by jamiros
 


True

But with upload speed really dictating your overall speed (where they advertise "10 meg downloads" but you really only get about 700-800k)

this could speed that up dramatically, if the "switches" back and forth are increased 100 fold


though im not an expert what so ever, this is how i understand it to be...



posted on Jul, 9 2008 @ 12:42 PM
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Yeah, upload speeds are the ones that are determined by your provider and by the bandwidth of the server or client PC that is providing the file. Some work is being done to make use of the flow of both sides. Right now I think the way to do it is bonding 2 connections. But that's what I've seen here.



posted on Jul, 9 2008 @ 12:53 PM
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I think they're talking more about the international hubs than they are your PC or your ISP.

Remember, those hubs have to switch data flow between millions of connections at some times.
All that switching and routing of packets takes up allot of time in the end.

If they can speed that up, then the connection speed increases as well.



posted on Jul, 9 2008 @ 12:57 PM
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Yeah depending on the cost of this.ISP's would be able to give out more downloads and uploads because it would cause less network congestion, take less time for switching.But depending on the cost because of course if its some insane price ISP's aren't going to bother with it.



posted on Jul, 9 2008 @ 12:58 PM
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Ok first off . Modems wont support it . Flat out . There would be a need to increase price to cover the new technology. Which is undoubtedly gonna be passed on to you .

Your average (high speed)cable modem is capped at 38 Mbps..

If i remember correctly . (FTTH) Fiber to the house. "Modems" have a max capacity of 200Mbps.

Also i don't understand . 100% faster than ? Are they talking about 100% faster than the 40Gbps that is possible now ?
100% faster than regular fiber? Which general is 100Mbps on the high end . with 200Mbps the fastest rolled out in the states. By fiso. Still in testing.

Or 100% faster than the 40Mbps i have now ? Which is obviously already possible.
This article is quite vague..

Now take my name for example. d11_m_na_c05.cm is the name of comcasts "unlimited" config. 0/0 I generally get 4000Kbps down but comcrap caps us at the node at 300Kps upload.
So even tho its possible to supply everyone with around 1000Kps upload Heck even symmetrical bandwith. They don't give it to us.
So while it may be possible and easy . Don't count on seeing it . As they will just over subscribe anyway . And you'll never see what your paying for .


[edit on 9-7-2008 by d11_m_na_c05]



posted on Jul, 9 2008 @ 12:58 PM
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Ha! At no extra cost? Bollocks.

The telcos will have to buy the equipment that uses this technology, which will be passed on to customers, as everything is.

A lot of the above comments are focusing on the wrong thing, anyway. This technology would be first deployed into the core networks, not the last mile. For example someone mentioned QoS.

That's a fluffy cloud IP term and doesn't actually deal with the transmission medium. Everyone forgets about layer 1 stuff, especially IP guru's who think packets disappear into a network "cloud" and magically come out the other side. They don't know or care how it gets there. That's my job!

It's not core network bandwidth that is the issue, it is the last mile that bottlenecks. Get rid of the copper and deploy fibre and everyone will find their speeds increase. Our core network is awash with available bandwidth, as are other telco's, it's getting it to the user that is the costly, difficult bit.

Also, they are pretty slow on the uptake, these Auzzies. We're just putting in something called Glimmerglass, which is one of the worlds first fully optical multiplexor's. It's not great, as it doesn't allow dynamic cross connection management, but it allows for the first time an entirely optical network.

What a lot of people don't know is that despite the reams of fibre optic used in modern networks, most of the actual work is still done electrically. The fibre is only a broadcast medium, not actually involved in the routing of the network.



posted on Jul, 9 2008 @ 01:01 PM
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People, please note, this "ONLY" applies to fiber-optic's.

What I mean is usually at some point down the line, the Internet is brought to MOST people through copper phone lines.

It will assist large ISP's as well as the true Internet Backbone, but it may have much less overall assistance to the consumer level.

Even if this worked exactly as advertised, most people still pay by the connection speed (which, btw, is NOT your true download/upload speed).

It may allow more ISP's to offer more lines, I.E. service more customer's, but who says YOUR end cost will go down.

BTW, we have known since it was created, we still don't know the true upper limits of fiber-optic capabilities.
As the electronics get better, it'd speed increases (again).



posted on Jul, 9 2008 @ 01:15 PM
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reply to post by mrmonsoon
 


Ok so there claiming 400Gbps? Since 40Gbps is already possible. They dont clarify if there talking about 100x residential speed. commercial speed. Backbone speed. ect.

We have already sent information at the speed of light+ over fiber. Will this then be over 100x the speed of light+ ?

I think this article is crap . They could have had someone that has a clue what there talking about that could offer an explanation not a claim . But that's media for ya.



posted on Jul, 9 2008 @ 01:23 PM
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Uhh this is just an Optical switch/router. This will reduce bottlenecks considerbly. I Just got Fiber to the home and am waiting for the Modem
This technology will reduce congestion considerably and will bring us one step closer to seeing an all optical computer(they are using Optical integrated circuits, that is what really caught my eye
)



posted on Jul, 9 2008 @ 01:38 PM
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Sorry I read just the quote and it is the most dumbed down explanation of some optical switch I ever read.


You can still have 100x speed just upgrade your bandwidth (and pay a LOT more, obviously), its easy. Optical switches shall surely increase the backbone speeds or point to point speed but its not true for the last mile. Of course just like any other new tech its going to take time and will cost a lot initially.

And the term 'internet speed' is too broad. It depends on too many factors.



posted on Jul, 9 2008 @ 01:39 PM
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Originally posted by d11_m_na_c05
reply to post by mrmonsoon
 


Ok so there claiming 400Gbps? Since 40Gbps is already possible. They dont clarify if there talking about 100x residential speed. commercial speed. Backbone speed. ect.

We have already sent information at the speed of light+ over fiber. Will this then be over 100x the speed of light+ ?

I think this article is crap . They could have had someone that has a clue what there talking about that could offer an explanation not a claim . But that's media for ya.



In laymans terms:

If you have fiber-optic from point a to point b, the ultimate speed limit of information traveling from point a to point b is ONLY limited by the speed/kind of electronics on either side.

Every year or two, a breakthrough in electronics allows for a great increase in the amount and speed of information traveling from point a to point b.

Since almost no one has fiber-optic going right to their door, much less inside the home, that means at some point, information must be transmitted over copper phone lines. There IS a upper speed limit on copper lines.

further, since most people pay for Internet based on the connsction speed they have to their ISP, it may have limited benifits for the end consumer.

What another poster pointed out was that since it increases not only speed but the amount of data transmitted, it will help resolve Internet bottlenecks, and the less of them, the faster everything seems.

Also, this article was about a piece of internet networking equipment, called a switch.
This break through allows the "switch" to send information and get to it's next line and send 100X faster.

That means it can send information along to 100 lines compared to only one line with todays tech.



posted on Jul, 9 2008 @ 02:00 PM
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Of course this is big in Australia. Australia has limited bandwidth usage.
If you go over you pay more. Ridiculous!



posted on Jul, 9 2008 @ 02:03 PM
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Originally posted by Ferengi
Of course this is big in Australia. Australia has limited bandwidth usage.
If you go over you pay more. Ridiculous!


As opposed to N. America where you go over the inivisible line and they start shaping your network traffic drastically down to below 20 kbps sometimes worse.



posted on Jul, 9 2008 @ 02:08 PM
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reply to post by sardion2000
 


That is true for some isp's, but not with Verizon.



posted on Jul, 9 2008 @ 03:42 PM
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Interesting, but I wonder what the networks would do with it since the majority of people who have internet are still on dial-up. Would we be able to see the transition for the majority of the population from dial-up to fiber, or will it go straight to wireless (WiMAX)??



posted on Jul, 9 2008 @ 03:54 PM
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Working in the wireless industry I have seen that wireless internet or in any case wireless anything is very un-reliable. WiMax works in the 3.6GHz range thus you would need to buy new equipment to connect to it, most radios inside laptops are 2.4GHz radios which is the band that WiFi operates at the moment.

Right now the protocol 802.11n is in the initial stages and might be accepted by the FCC as a standard by November of this year. What every you buy that says it's 802.11n is just in BETA form and will not function as well.

Most wireless communications that are being used right now are in the 5.8GHz, 2.4GHz and 3.6GHz range (this is for internet distribution correct me if I'm wrong), some are in the 4.9GHz range but that is for emergency and military use.
BTW, 3.6GHz used to be used by the military as well.



posted on Jul, 9 2008 @ 03:55 PM
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Ok this is all interesting but has anyone heard of what they're doing to the internet with "THE GRID".... The speeds of today are going to be comparable from phone lines to cable modems, it's going to blow us away, you should look it up....



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