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I am seeking a rouge Scientist to help me prove an uncharted Meteorite

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posted on Jul, 7 2008 @ 07:36 AM
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I am seeking a person of standing (in the geological and/or meteoric sciences) that has NO affiliation with the propagandistic Universities or Museums in the United States. Basically what I need is a rouge scientist willing to perform the research I require without looking for back up from our false scientific community.

I had intention on approaching several persons well known in these forums to investigate and/or help me with my claim, but frankly I do not know them nor do I know if I can trust them.

I first came to ATS on June 4th of this year seeking people that could help me back my claim, but as I stated earlier, I don't trust very well and for good reason. One who trusts implicitly ends up with the shaft and I do not intent on having my claim absconded by someone who has false intentions.

What is my claim? I have found an uncharted Meteorite. I have been through the wringer with several so-called experts throughout the country and have been given different answers from all.

The only person I have trusted in this manner is a lay expert who has one of the largest private meteorite collections in the world. He told me (before recommending I meet the top Geologist in my state) that he had only seen one like mine before and it existed in the Museum of Natural History.

Any and all help is appreciated.

I will entertain questions and yes, I do have pictures and video, but I prefer to work with moderators if they will help me.




posted on Jul, 7 2008 @ 07:42 AM
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Is it a rock you have at your place, or a uncharted meteorite in the sky ?
Nevertheless, you do not need a scientist, but a geologist if its a rock you have at home, or an astronomer if it is in the sky.

And second, why dont you just post a picture of it? My brother in law is a geologist, and works in the mines of svalbard ( you know .. the doomsday seed vault place ) And I would be happy to forward a macro image of the stone to him.



posted on Jul, 7 2008 @ 07:44 AM
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reply to post by tep200377
 


I have the stone in my possession.



posted on Jul, 7 2008 @ 07:52 AM
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reply to post by tep200377
 


I am uploading pictures to photobucket...

A few minutes please...



posted on Jul, 7 2008 @ 11:21 AM
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A rouge scientist? You play World of Warcraft, don't you?


Yes, I'm teasing you, but only a little bit. It's a common mistake.

Rouge: any of various cosmetics for coloring the cheeks or lips red 2 : a red powder consisting essentially of ferric oxide used in polishing glass, metal, or gems and as a pigment

Rogue: 1 : vagrant, tramp 2 : a dishonest or worthless person : scoundrel 3 : a mischievous person : scamp 4 : a horse inclined to shirk or misbehave 5 : an individual exhibiting a chance and usually inferior biological variation

[edit on 7-7-2008 by sir_chancealot]



posted on Jul, 7 2008 @ 11:42 AM
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Check out this site:

www.aerolite.org...

The person seems willing to help anyone who thinks they have found a meteorite.

There are several criteria listed to determine if you have an actual meteorite.


THE TESTS
How to determine if you have a genuine meteorite

1) Visual Inspection
If you've read the previous passages you now know much more about meteorites than the average person. Congratulations, and thank you for reading this far. Now, please carefully consider the following: Does your rock exhibit any of the characteristics discussed above? Does it feel heavier than it should? Does it have regmaglypts, or patina, or fusion crust? Compare your rock to the photographs of real meteorites, and meteor-wrongs.

2) The Magnet Test
Let me say it one more time. A meteorite will stick easily to a good magnet. If your rock does not adhere to a powerful magnet you almost certainly do not have a meteorite. It is extremely unlikely that you have found "one of those meteorites that doesn't stick to a magnet." Remember, there are many Earth rocks that also stick to magnets, so if your specimen adheres to a magnet it is not automatically a meteorite, but it's a step in the right direction.

3) The Streak Test
Iron oxides like hematite and magnetite are the Earth rocks most frequently mistaken for meteorites. They are moderately heavy (not nearly as heavy as iron meteorites) and appear metallic in composition. Some specimens will stick to a magnet. If you think you have an iron meteorite, here's an easy test you can perform at home: Take your rock sample and scrape it against the coarse (unglazed) face of a white bathroom tile, just like you were drawing on a blackboard with a piece of chalk. If your rock leaves a reddish or rust-colored streak on the tile it is likely hematite. If it leaves a dark gray streak it is likely magnetite. Iron meteorites will generally leave NO STREAK, or possibly a very faint grayish mark.

4) The Nickel Test
As discussed earlier, most meteorites contain nickel and iron. Naturally occurring Earth rocks do not, so if your specimen tests positive for nickel it may be a meteorite. Kits that test for nickel can be purchased via the internet, or you can take your rock to a lab that assays (tests) for various mineral components.



posted on Jul, 7 2008 @ 01:03 PM
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Thanks. I have been through all of the hoops already. I know every test required.

I need someone to:

1. Test the stones' Density.

The stone is much heavier than it should be and this simple test will help enormously.

When I was at (A very large Museum in my state) one of the persons (not in charge) told me that my stone was VERY heavy for its size and then jokingly said, "Don't leave that here, you'll never get it back."

The lead geologist wouldn't test it, even though he acknowledged my stone had all the defining characteristics of a meteorite. He was actually upset that I knew as much about the science as I do.

2. Carbon Dating.

Let's see how old this bad boy is. We can go on from there.

3. Define each of the elements within.

I'm sure this is done chemically, but do not know the exact test.

4. View a sliver of the stone under an electron or laser scanning confocal microscope.

Self explanatory...


Summation:

I believe I have been rebuffed by scientists, simply because they do not know HOW to classify it.

Too many "experts" and all different conclusions.



posted on Jul, 7 2008 @ 01:04 PM
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reply to post by sir_chancealot
 


Thanks. I was tired. I usually catch my mistakes before publishing...

Usually...



posted on Jul, 7 2008 @ 01:19 PM
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reply to post by TheComte
 


BTW - These tests are only for Iron based Meteorites. I believe my specimen is a very rare form of Carbonaceous Chondrite.

This was only derived after 100's of hours of research.

I need someone with some sort of scientific standing to back me up. I will make it worth their while.




posted on Jul, 7 2008 @ 01:55 PM
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I would test the weight of with with a real balance scale. I wouldn't use any other type of scale.

On the other side of the balance scale, I would try gold, or iron, or granite. Or all three, to calculate the exact weight. You can then use the weight to find the "atomic weight". This would then give you a good idea of the density, when you compare it to size.

I would also test to see if there is any signs of burns. When entering the atmosphere obviously it will burn up a bit. Do you see any signs of a molten metal? Like drippy, wind/friction created blobs, or tear drops?

A lot of things in space are frozen, and ice, because of the vacuum of space. Do you notice any hollow areas that could seem to be where ice once existed yet melted away on entry of the atmosphere?

What is the weight at size measurements?

I was once in the desert and saw 4 civilian humvees driving around. They claimed to be meteorite hunters. They claimed they made their money by finding small meteorites, some of them the size of golf balls. They said some meteorites the size of golf balls can be worth up to $40,000.

So if someone says you don't have a meteorite, it might be because they don't want to fork over the cash that it is worth.



posted on Jul, 7 2008 @ 04:18 PM
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Originally posted by ALLis0NE
I would test the weight of with with a real balance scale. I wouldn't use any other type of scale.

On the other side of the balance scale, I would try gold, or iron, or granite. Or all three, to calculate the exact weight. You can then use the weight to find the "atomic weight". This would then give you a good idea of the density, when you compare it to size.


Thanks! Great feedback. I will do just that.


I would also test to see if there is any signs of burns. When entering the atmosphere obviously it will burn up a bit. Do you see any signs of a molten metal? Like drippy, wind/friction created blobs, or tear drops?

A lot of things in space are frozen, and ice, because of the vacuum of space. Do you notice any hollow areas that could seem to be where ice once existed yet melted away on entry of the atmosphere?


You are referring to Fusion Crust, and yes Fusion Crust covers by 70% of specimen. There are actually little scratch marks all over the fusion crust that were probably created by particles smashing into it as it entered the atmosphere.

Also, all throughout the fusion crust are crevasses that reveal minerals, crystals (or diamonds, not sure).

Please see the pictures. The fusion crust is black, where as the rest of the stone is white and unadulterated.


What is the weight at size measurements?


It measures 7" x 6" and weighs approximately 10lbs or 4500 grams. It's a whopper.


I was once in the desert and saw 4 civilian humvees driving around. They claimed to be meteorite hunters. They claimed they made their money by finding small meteorites, some of them the size of golf balls. They said some meteorites the size of golf balls can be worth up to $40,000.

So if someone says you don't have a meteorite, it might be because they don't want to fork over the cash that it is worth.


Yeah, I know how much they can go for... this is not just a keepsake for me.



posted on Jul, 7 2008 @ 11:36 PM
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Originally posted by Tapped In
Also, all throughout the fusion crust are crevasses that reveal minerals, crystals (or diamonds, not sure).


Meteorites do not have vesicles. To find out for sure you can send some photos to the guy from the website I posted earlier. If that isn't enough you can send him a small piece. He will tell you if it's real and send it back to you.



posted on Jul, 8 2008 @ 12:31 AM
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Thank you, but I have been through all this and do not wish to follow the same path twice.

I need a someone who exists outside the current circles.

btw - I met with a man who has 30 years experience in the field and he said that he has seen meteorites in Japan recently that would have never been considered meteorites 10 years ago. He cut my stone and recommended I show it to others.

I am not interested in foregone conclusions as to what a meteorite is or is not.

We are learning so much about the universe lately that whatever we have known to be truth for our whole lives will be a distant memory.

Remember, the Earth is no longer flat.

Thank you for your input nonetheless.






posted on Jul, 8 2008 @ 12:53 AM
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Originally posted by Tapped In

I need someone to:

1. Test the stones' Density.


p=m/v

You have the mass, a simple water displacement test will tell you the volume, and give you the type of results you'd want to have on hand before taking this to the next level. Time on an electron microscope is NOT cheap.



posted on Jul, 8 2008 @ 01:07 AM
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Thank you very much. I will perform whatever test I can on my own to reduce cost. Your feedback is much appreciated.




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