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Tropical Storm Bertha is heading for Carolna coast

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posted on Jul, 6 2008 @ 09:48 AM
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Tropical Storm Bertha is heading for Carolna coast


www.wunderground.com

This graphic shows an approximate representation of coastal areas under a hurricane warning (red), hurricane watch (pink), tropical storm warning (blue) and tropical storm watch (purple). The orange circle indicates the current position of the center of the tropical cyclone. The black line and dots show the National Hurricane Center (NHC) forecast track of the center at the times indicated. The dot indicating the forecast center location will be black if the cyclone is forecast to be tropical and will be white with a black outline if the cyclone is forecast to be extratropical. If only an L is displayed, then the system is forecast to be a remnant low. The letter inside the dot indicates the NHC's forecast intensity for that time.

(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jul, 6 2008 @ 09:48 AM
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I haven't heard any news on this yet, but as a resident of Eastern NC, I think it is worthy of at least a little attention. "tis the season" as they say. time to get the supplies ready and pray for a little rain, not huge floods again.


www.wunderground.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jul, 6 2008 @ 09:58 AM
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After several years of severe drought here in the Southeast, most of us further inland would welcome the rain a Tropical System brings. I don't think to many folks would fuss about a Cat 1 or less and would gladly take a few tropical storms to moving slowly over the region. Even though this year is better drought wise, I've heard it said the only thing that could "break" the drought is a couple of tropical storms in a season.



posted on Jul, 6 2008 @ 10:05 AM
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Bertha will need to turn more westerly to strike the US. Looking at your link, the history of storms on Bertha's current track indicates it will remain on a northerly curve.



posted on Jul, 6 2008 @ 10:05 AM
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reply to post by jefwane
 


I aggree 100%. I just don't want another Fran. Those are bad for business. My yard and garden sure could use the rain.



posted on Jul, 6 2008 @ 10:11 AM
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www.wunderground.com...

this link shows the models, yesterday there were 4 coming on land and 1 going out to sea. It doesn't hurt to be prepared in any case. I just thought I would post this to let those that had no Idea, about it.



posted on Jul, 6 2008 @ 10:21 AM
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This is the current model forecasts. I wonder how good they are this far out?




posted on Jul, 6 2008 @ 12:29 PM
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reply to post by aerialview
 


I don't have alot of faith in the "weather guessers". I always like the early report of how many named storms we will have this season. I think they throw darts. I just thought haveing a storm that might impact land would be a news worthy event, and as of yet, not news.



posted on Jul, 6 2008 @ 01:11 PM
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come on man...

your jumping the gun just a little...

Its still well over a week before ANY potentail US-land fall...




Honestly, the storm can hit anywhere from Cancaun, to Bermuda...


Its still WAY TOO EARLY to tell...

People should be prepared, but its WAY to early to start boarding up windows...

and just for fun, i perdict that this guy spins northward, and passes to the west of bermuda...

[edit on 7/6/2008 by TKainZero]



posted on Jul, 6 2008 @ 01:30 PM
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Woah, the OP needs to tone back that headline. I am no weather expert but as a life long NC resident, I know enough to understand that this far out no one knows where this is going to hit. It could hit from Maine to Texas, or go up north through the Atlantic. The headline is alarmist, it needs to be changed - also, this is not "breaking alternative news."

You cannot extrapolate model positions. I have a feeling the OP took the day 5 model positions and continued the line into the Carolinas to make this discovery. Day 5 positions are almost always wrong, and there is a reason why the National Hurricane Center does not do this - hurricanes don't move in the same pattern - just because they move west for 5 days does not mean they can't move north on day 6.

Also, weather underground is a good site and never made that claim to begin with. This is just a link to their models page.

[edit on 6-7-2008 by ALightinDarkness]



posted on Jul, 6 2008 @ 03:08 PM
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Being that I live 100 yards from the ocean near Myrtle Beach SC, I'm already preparing for a possible evacuation.

Less money spent on needless things this week to pay for gas and other expenses if we have to leave soon.

Im not too terribly worried, because only time will tell on this one. But I can't let my guard down. Most storms seem to track to the north.



posted on Jul, 6 2008 @ 03:15 PM
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How the storm curves depends on how strong it gets. The stronger the storm - the greater the curve to the east. If it stays weak like a tropical storm then it will come closer.

We will find out in one week ...



posted on Jul, 6 2008 @ 03:21 PM
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This is the sort of news report that gets me to ring up my grandchildren who live on the Carolina coast and tell them to get with it and come north of the border to visit me. Perhaps it is just my desire to see my grandchildren and great-grandchildren, but in truth hurricanes truly frighten me.



posted on Jul, 6 2008 @ 03:36 PM
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N.C. Does need some rain but hopefully not a big flood is going to happen or a cat. 5 hurricane...



posted on Jul, 6 2008 @ 05:02 PM
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the post was not meant to be as alarming as some have taken it. I simply meant to alert people to watch out for it. I realize the track is not predictable for some time now, but yesterday the computer model had 4 out of 5 coming to Wilmington. Today it is different, tomorrow it will be different. If you know there is one out there you will watch it and plan accordingly. That was my intent.



posted on Jul, 6 2008 @ 06:11 PM
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Tropical models beyond 72 hours are guess games, and should never be taken seriously. The problem is each hour beyond the current weather conditions, the model is predicting the future. That prediction comes with errors, which becomes compounded and past a certain point because the next prediction is made from a previous prediction. Since Bertha formed, the models have in the long range had it going everywhere from the northern Atlantic Ocean to Florida.

[edit on 6-7-2008 by ALightinDarkness]



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