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Tips to save money?

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posted on Jul, 2 2008 @ 04:32 PM
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Seems like we are all getting in big # now, with the dollar falling, food and gas prices rising. Most of us are barely making it, and here in Norway we are really starting to notice things, food prices has doubled over the past few years, gas prices rising as always (luckily for me i am 17 and i take the bus and my parents like to walk to work).

But we don't know for how long we can hold this for, we started growing our own food on a garden we made, we are also fixing the basement, and that will cost 100 000Kr (around 20 000 dollars), we plan to rent it our for 5 000 Kr a month (1 000 dollars).

Here things aren't so bad, but it's going downhill..




So i want everyone to work together and share ideas on how to save every penny so that we can do our best to stay afloat in this ocean that we are headed for.




posted on Jul, 2 2008 @ 04:44 PM
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If everyone saves then there would be no money to earn.

That's my two cents.

All needful things should regulated in price with price caps placed on by law.



posted on Jul, 2 2008 @ 04:46 PM
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Not sure how things are in your part of the world..
But I live in Canada, and ten years ago I bought a set of books called
"The Tightwad Gazette". Written by an author from The United States.
www.amazon.ca...

I got the best advice on how to live on the cheap, and it all makes sense as to why we should.
Kudos to you for thinking this way at your young age!



posted on Jul, 2 2008 @ 05:09 PM
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reply to post by linuxer
 



I would have to look into your individual life style to offer any valid tips, Linuxer.
But I suppose there are certain generalities that apply to many people.
For example, the fridge is a major energy-hog. Do you use it during the winter?
Since you live in Norway, I think you might consider storing your food in a special box - or stack of boxes - in your garden or balcony, if you have one, or in a cool room (again, if you have one).

For many people, one of the greatest money-wasters is buying processed foods (snacks) and drinks that could be easily made at home for much less money (and they'd be much more delicious).
"Iced tea" is one such example. I don't know how much it costs, since I never buy it, but I am pretty sure it costs much more than if it were home-made - and I know for a fact that its taste and/or nutritive value cannot compare to home-made "iced tea".
The same goes for many other ready-made drinks and snacks.


P.S. You might want to have a look at these links:

Frugal Blog

and

Frugal Living


You'll find more of the kind if you google-search for "frugal living".




[edit on 2-7-2008 by Vanitas]



posted on Jul, 2 2008 @ 05:13 PM
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I came up with a few ways myself.


1- Why pay for TV when you can watch tv shows and movies online? TV nowadays is just full of propaganda anyways.
My 3 favorite sites to watch documentaries, movies and TV shows are:

tv-links.cc
surfthechannel.com
watch-movies.net


2- Shop around for the cheap food, i have many stores here that sell different things, but i started doing the shopping for my parents since im a cheap guy so i know where to find the cheapest things. I buy juice at one place, bread and ham and cheese at another, etc. I just shop around at the cheapest places even if it does take longer


3- I doubt this would apply for everyone, but whenever i need just some extra cash, maybe to pay for my monthly bus card. I just get my guitar, my portable amplifier and i play on the streets and i tend to get around 50-100 dollars every time i do it, depending on how busy it is and what spots i choose



posted on Jul, 2 2008 @ 05:26 PM
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2- Shop around for the cheap food, i have many stores here that sell different things, but i started doing the shopping for my parents since im a cheap guy so i know where to find the cheapest things. I buy juice at one place, bread and ham and cheese at another, etc. I just shop around at the cheapest places even if it does take longer


That works - even though time really IS money, too
- provided you don't use a car to get around. I say that because I knew a person who was SOO proud of her "economies"... not realising how much money she had spent on gas while shopping around.
)

Better still... why not MAKE your own bread?
Nowadays, there are machines that can practically do it all for you.
(A cousin of mine, ahem, makes bread - actually the machine makes it for her
- that is so good it can be actually used as a gourmet gift.)
Myself, I am not much into bread, but when I make it, I prefer the old fashioned-way - with the ice-cold "bath" in the end, which makes the crust all crunchy and delicious. And it also makes the entire neighbourhood smell of freshly baked bread. Yum.





[edit on 2-7-2008 by Vanitas]



posted on Jul, 2 2008 @ 06:06 PM
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Originally posted by Vanitas




2- Shop around for the cheap food, i have many stores here that sell different things, but i started doing the shopping for my parents since im a cheap guy so i know where to find the cheapest things. I buy juice at one place, bread and ham and cheese at another, etc. I just shop around at the cheapest places even if it does take longer


That works - even though time really IS money, too
- provided you don't use a car to get around. I say that because I knew a person who was SOO proud of her "economies"... not realising how much money she had spent on gas while shopping around.
)

Better still... why not MAKE your own bread?
Nowadays, there are machines that can practically do it all for you.
(A cousin of mine, ahem, makes bread - actually the machine makes it for her
- that is so good it can be actually used as a gourmet gift.)
Myself, I am not much into bread, but when I make it, I prefer the old fashioned-way - with the ice-cold "bath" in the end, which makes the crust all crunchy and delicious. And it also makes the entire neighbourhood smell of freshly baked bread. Yum.





[edit on 2-7-2008 by Vanitas]



hahaha, i can imagine how that works. Saving 50 dollars by driving around a few times but spending twice on gas. (sorry if my math of prices are off, i was never one to keep up with gas prices
)


but i like the idea of my own bread, i never thoguht it over but i have a bread machine at home also. But is it cost effective to make your own bread? I dont even know what to use



posted on Jul, 2 2008 @ 06:17 PM
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but i like the idea of my own bread, i never thoguht it over but i have a bread machine at home also. But is it cost effective to make your own bread? I dont even know what to use



As I said, I have no idea of hw to work the machine either - though I can ask my cousin, and I am pretty sure there were recipes included in the booklet that came with it - but I would suggest: flour, water, shortening, and salt.


You can easily find delicious recipes on the internet: in fact, just reading through them makes one's mouth water...


And while I haven't really calculated the costs, I am pretty sure that it is cheaper (especially if you make a big quantity at once) - how could it not be?

And while we're at it... hey, you can even make your own flour, you know?

I've seen desktop "mills" (wheat-grinding machines) in practically every gadget store I've been in the past few years.



posted on Jul, 2 2008 @ 06:33 PM
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You know what, i seriosuly want to look into that, my parents make bread all the time, im sure i could even ask them!
And i have to say, the best thing about making your own food is that you make what you like, you have complete control!!



I found this on making your own flour
www.grainmaster.com.au...

You have to buy something but at least its possible!

And imagine all the money you would save, it would really be nice, specially since everything is getting so overpriced lately!

If i could only get a cow and make my own cheese



posted on Jul, 2 2008 @ 07:18 PM
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One way to save money and to slow down in this fast paced world is to ride a bicycle to and from places that are within short distances. This also promotes health within the body. It is win win.

One can purchase a back pack to carry a smaller amount of groceries. The back pack can be purchased at a thrift shop. This serves the community in many ways. It is cheaper to purchase these used items, and they do not end up as waste.

Have meals with friends and family. It takes less energy to cook in larger quantities. A meal amongst love ones is always more enjoyable. The different members of the meal can each bring a different thing (such as home made bread). Breaking that bread together promotes connectedness. Having the support of others will promote longevity of saving money.

Eat chicken, it is affordable and is easier for the body to digest than beef. The chicken can be stretched out for more meals by adding beans, rice, and potatoes.

Eat high protein meals, such as beans, rice, and potatoes. They are very affordable, and can be made in many different ways.

Entertain yourself with means that do not use electricity. Such as reading a book, Frisbee golf (frolf), cycling, etc. This also is a win win situation. They promote health, stimulate differing parts of the brain, and well... fun!



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