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America's Shrinking Food Wraps: Same Price, Less Food

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posted on Jun, 30 2008 @ 11:40 AM
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America's Shrinking Food Wraps: Same Price, Less Food


news.yahoo.com

Similar reductions have recently happened or are on the horizon for many other products: Tropicana orange juice containers are shrinking from 96 ounces to 89; Wrigley's is dropping its the 17-stick PlenTPak in favor of the 15-stick Slim Pack; Dial soap bars now weigh half an ounce less, and that's even before they melt in the shower. Containers of Country Crock spread, Hellmann's mayonnaise and Edy's and Breyer's ice cream have all slimmed down as well (although that may not necessarily be a bad thing).
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jun, 30 2008 @ 11:40 AM
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SNEAKY SNEAKY! WOW. So this is how we are dealing with the economic crisis? What a clever way to fool people. This will all come around to haunt us sooner or later.

news.yahoo.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jun, 30 2008 @ 12:03 PM
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you can put dog poop in a shiny bag.
its still dog poop though...

much like this economy in general.
poop in a bag on your doorstep.



posted on Jun, 30 2008 @ 12:09 PM
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Well, the mfr only has two options. Either keep the weight or amount the same and raise prices or reduce the weight or amount and keep the price the same. High fuel prices and the like affect more than just you and your gasoline.

Bottom line, it all comes down to the consumer. All you have to do is read the package before purchasing. If the consumer is to stupid to read the packages and compare weight vs price among the different products and vendors then they have no one to blame but themselves.



posted on Jun, 30 2008 @ 12:16 PM
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This is also part of the issue:

Dow raises prices



posted on Jun, 30 2008 @ 12:27 PM
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Originally posted by WhatTheory
Bottom line, it all comes down to the consumer. All you have to do is read the package before purchasing. If the consumer is to stupid to read the packages and compare weight vs price among the different products and vendors then they have no one to blame but themselves.


Must be a burden carrying around that giant brain of yours.

What if you have two kids you have to bring to the store with you? What if you have paid a sitter to watch the kids and need to get back ASAP?

It would be an ideal world to hope that everyone has the time and means to do math for every single item they purchase at the store, but that is not the reality. Mfr's have to have some responsibility too.



posted on Jun, 30 2008 @ 12:33 PM
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This isn't a new development, though. They started doing this when the economy was booming, only they did it in the food industry and labeled it "corporate responsibillity." When the fast food chains started downsizing their burgers, fries, and some of the media, politicians, and celebs applauded them and said they were finally taking responsibility. In reality, what was really happening was the consumer was getting less for the same price vs before the switch. Maybe the fast food industry saw this downturn coming, maybe they just saw a chance to jump onto a hot button issue (obesity) and turn it into a bigger profit margin, but whatever it was the end result was the same.

The difference now is it's happening with items that can't claim concern for people's health as an excuse. Something's not right here, though. In past economic downturns, bulk items and consumables packaged in quantities enough to feed an army have sold very well, even at higher prices. This time it seems like the producers are going in a counter-intuitive manner by downsizing their products and offering even less bulk items, resulting in a more expensive product when you take packaging and such into account. Also, has anyone else noticed that you don't see those massive cereal boxes that were 50% empty space on shelves much anymore? I remember as a kid my mom would buy me Wheaties in a box the size of a small briefcase. Was this a space issue or a packaging environmental waste issue that lead to this change?



posted on Jun, 30 2008 @ 12:46 PM
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Originally posted by TruthWithin
Must be a burden carrying around that giant brain of yours.

No, it's quite easy and not a burden.

However, the first sign of a losing argument is when people attempt to throw around lame vaguely disguised insults.



What if you have two kids you have to bring to the store with you? What if you have paid a sitter to watch the kids and need to get back ASAP?
It would be an ideal world to hope that everyone has the time and means to do math for every single item they purchase at the store, but that is not the reality.

This is not the mfr's problem. How is the mfr problem a person has to many kids to handle?
Try and take some responsibility for your own actions. Using your flawed logic, why should they put any labels on the packaging to begin with since people will not read it, right?. People take the time to compare prices of different products and vendors. They take the time to compare the fat content or the calories of different products.
Besides, most people do this now anyway. I mean, why pay 2 dollars for 6 oz. of a product when right next to it on the shelf there is the same thing from a different mfr and it's 2 dollars for 12 oz?

What do you want? Do you want the government to come in and hold your hand and tell you what or what not to buy?



posted on Jun, 30 2008 @ 12:58 PM
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reply to post by WhatTheory
 


I thought my insult was less than vague.


No I don't want the government to hold my hand. It is a shady practice to lower quantity and keep price the same instead of calling a spade a spade and raise prices. It is less honest.

You were the one who called people too "stupid" who don't have time to sit there with a calculator and work out cost differences. It is that kind of insensitivity that gives conservatives a bad name.



posted on Jun, 30 2008 @ 01:54 PM
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You guys are silly
Here at my local wal-mart they have little calculations next to the price of foods that shows cost per/oz for me. But I understand that your grocer might not do the same thing and that you don't have the time to do it yourself if you're really trying to put together a budget.



posted on Jun, 30 2008 @ 02:19 PM
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If this is true, it might be a good thing. American food is full of sugar and chemical additives.. eating less of it will save your life. Maybe if it costs too much people will start growing more of their own food or buying from the local farmers, and eating more sweet potatoes and less sweet bags of M&M's.



posted on Jun, 30 2008 @ 02:40 PM
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This is the start down the path to food rationing I believe.

Everyone else has NO problem raising prices with inflation. Why should the food industry be any different?

In most of the world, the food is simply disappearing.
In the US it will get more expensive and smaller in quantity but will still be there right up until only the rich can afford to eat.



posted on Jun, 30 2008 @ 03:35 PM
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Originally posted by TruthWithin
I thought my insult was less than vague.

Good, I'm glad you admit it was a insult and thus proving my point.
Sad, just sad.


No I don't want the government to hold my hand.

Are you sure?


It is a shady practice to lower quantity and keep price the same instead of calling a spade a spade and raise prices. It is less honest.

How is it shady or dishonest when the weight & amount is printed on the product? I guess you don't know the definition. It would be different if the weight was not on the package then the consumer would have no idea.


You were the one who called people too "stupid" who don't have time to sit there with a calculator and work out cost differences.

Yeah, people in general are stupid. I did NOT personally insult you or another poster on this forum. You should know the rules around here by now.

Besides, as another poster pointed out, most stores now due the calculations for you. On the price tag of the product on the shelf, they tell you the price of the item along with the cost per oz or whatever unit of measure the product uses. So now, the consumer really has no one to blame but themselves.


It is that kind of insensitivity that gives conservatives a bad name.

Well, that's tough. Somtimes 'tough-love' is what is needed. People need to take responsibility for their own actions instead of relying on the government for everything. You should try it sometime.



posted on Jun, 30 2008 @ 03:53 PM
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reply to post by WhatTheory
 


As much as I would love to argue this to death with you, it is obvious that we both have differing opinions. You keep going wit your tough love and I will keep walking on my daisies and maybe we will see each other somewhere over the rainbow.

I believe that if you are used to buying a 96oz orange juice for a certain price, and they replace that with a 86oz orange juice and keep it in almost identical packaging, then it is dishonest to the consumer. People shop by price, and when they are accustomed to getting a certain amount for a certain price then it makes a difference. Not all of us shop at WalMart, so we don't have the luxury of the math being done for us.

Do you have to believe that? No.

I do have a problem with you saying that people are stupid for not realizing that. It is too bad your ego can't tell the difference.



posted on Jun, 30 2008 @ 03:57 PM
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Originally posted by TruthWithin
Not all of us shop at WalMart, so we don't have the luxury of the math being done for us.

Umm...it's not just Wal-Mart. Most grocery stores now do this.


I do have a problem with you saying that people are stupid for not realizing that. It is too bad your ego can't tell the difference.

Ego? What does ego have to do with the price of cheese?

It has nothing to do with ego. How about you look and read before making a purchase? Seems pretty simple instead of blaming everyone except for yourself.



posted on Jun, 30 2008 @ 04:20 PM
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reply to post by WhatTheory
 


Cool man, whatever. We agree to disagree.



posted on Jun, 30 2008 @ 04:29 PM
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Originally posted by WhatTheory
All you have to do is read the package before purchasing. If the consumer is to stupid to read the packages and compare weight vs price among the different products and vendors then they have no one to blame but themselves.


ok then so what if the person is blind?



posted on Jun, 30 2008 @ 04:36 PM
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Just have to stop buying pre-packaged garbage and learn how to cook with fresh produce. It's not hard and really doesn't take up that much more time.

If you don't want to cook, make a sandwich.

I get really mad when I see food pantry lines on TV showing all the people in line. But then the majority of the "food" available there is all pre-packaged garbage. Crackers, cheese-its, etc. The most healthy thing I saw on one pantry video was a bag of apples. But those were probably irradiated.

As far as soap going down the drain, there is an alternative. Head to your nearest home craft venue and ask for "cold process soap." A single bar of cold processed soap should last two people approximately a month. If you wash more often, it should last two weeks. Plus it contains glycerin naturally, which is a by-product of soapmaking and doesn't dry your skin. The only caveat, is to keep cold processed soap dry between uses and don't let it sit in a pool of liquid. Then it too will just go down the drain.

It's called cold process because there's no external heat applied once the ingredients are mixed together, usually sodium hydroxide (lye) and vegetable oil or animal fats. The chemical reaction makes it "cook" in the mold and completes the saponification process.



posted on Jun, 30 2008 @ 05:01 PM
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As a consumer you just have to be more aware of the products you buy. I loath the companies who change sizes in order to attempt to trick the consumer to by their partial half gallon of ice cream when compared with the price of a full half gallon of the competition.

It's about marketing and marketing is trickery and lies to sell a product rather than letting the quality & price of the product selling itself.

I remember when candy bars (chocolate bars) were much larger in the late 60's and they cost 5 cents each. They made them smaller in the 70's then they went to 10 cents, 15 cents up until now they cost as much as 89 cents at some places. Of course they brought the big sizes back even a bit bigger and call them large size and charge accordingly.

On the other hand marketing has brought us mini-bars, medium bars and giant bars. In that respect I kind of like the options.



posted on Jun, 30 2008 @ 05:03 PM
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I see that this has been mentioned, but I wanted to dedicate a post entirely to it, as our family has recently become much more cognizant of what we're spending at the grocery store..

Next to the price on the shelf below the item you're looking at, is the "unit price" - this is the price per ounce/pound/etc of the different available brands. This can be helpful not only in choosing the most economical brand, but in choosing the most economical package size. I went to my local market (Stop & Shop) for some yeast to use in bread making, and found (quite to my surprise) that the large jars of yeast that sell for $9.99 were more expensive per gram(?) than the off-brand envelope-style packaged yeast. I gave it a shot to see if it would rise my dough as well as the Fleishman's that I'm used to, and low and behold, it worked better!

Hope this helps somebody down the line. =)




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