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Canada: We'll search your iPod for infringing media

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posted on Jun, 27 2008 @ 02:25 PM
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Canada: We'll search your iPod for infringing media


tech.yahoo.com

Big Brother is alive and kicking in the Great White North. According to The Vancouver Sun, the Canadian government is preparing to revamp its copyright laws in regard to portable electronics, including laptops and iPods, as it forges an alliance with the U.S. and the European Union called the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA). ACTA would essentially turn international borders into a copyright Gestapo, compelling border guards to check "laptops, iPods and even cellular phones for content that 'infringes' on copyright laws, such as ripped CDs and movies."

You ripped a DVD legally (say, using one of those digital download editions now included on some discs)? Doesn't matter. Guards can seize your iPod and even destroy it if they deem you've broken the law. Then you will be fined. Canada already performs random searches of laptops to search for child pornography. The new rules would step up these searches considerably.

(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jun, 27 2008 @ 02:25 PM
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Your Ipod is now at risk as well it seems. There is hope that this will be tabled at the G-8 summit meeting comming up but even the fact that they are considering it in secret as the story eludes too should give Canadians some pause. One you give up a freedom or liberty that was paid for in blood its gone forever. Take a lesson from the US Patriot act eh?

tech.yahoo.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jun, 27 2008 @ 02:58 PM
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Great, now the Tax payers get screwed twice:

Once at the border with property distruction ad fines and then again when the Citizen sues the Criminal Government and wins - in both cases the tax payers get stuck with the bill or worse.



posted on Jun, 27 2008 @ 03:03 PM
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And don't forget the excise tax we pay here on media like blank DVD's and CD's and such. That goes into entertainment industry pockets too. A tidy little subsidy that I doubt will be repealed, though now redundant given these changing copyright laws. I wonder how much farther we can bend over?



posted on Jun, 27 2008 @ 03:05 PM
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It's simple: leave all electronic devices at home. What do they think they're going to do now?



posted on Jun, 27 2008 @ 03:20 PM
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reply to post by FredT
 


a vast majority use Mobiles as MP3s and MP4s
what are they going to do look through the phone records and text messages aswell while they give it the once over?



posted on Jun, 27 2008 @ 03:23 PM
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It's disturbing that they are even thinking of a law like this. But, it isn't a law yet and I don't know how much support it would get in the House. Anyone have any idea on how close it is to becoming a law?

Just because a law is proposed doesn't mean it will come to pass. Hopefully, our elected officials take note of the myriad of problems this law presents and vote it down.



posted on Jun, 27 2008 @ 03:25 PM
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I just got a mp3 player. how would you be able to tell a legally download mp3 file from an illegally downloaded one or one copied from a friend that did a legal download?



posted on Jun, 27 2008 @ 03:29 PM
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reply to post by lost in the midwest
 


that would still be iliagl getting it off a friend as hes distributing it to someone else


they cant unless they check the base of the mp3
each time a file is transferd through diffrent hosts it picks up a certain code of that host.



posted on Jun, 27 2008 @ 03:50 PM
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reply to post by bodrul
 


Thanks for the info, I didn't know that big brother was that sneaky.



posted on Jun, 27 2008 @ 03:55 PM
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Originally posted by bodrul
reply to post by lost in the midwest
 


that would still be iliagl getting it off a friend as hes distributing it to someone else


they cant unless they check the base of the mp3
each time a file is transferd through diffrent hosts it picks up a certain code of that host.



Rofl. No it does not.

en.wikipedia.org...

There is such a thing as Digital Rights Management, however.



posted on Jun, 27 2008 @ 04:32 PM
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reply to post by forsakenwayfarer
 


i read that on the bbc a while ago
when they did a report on click



posted on Jun, 27 2008 @ 04:34 PM
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reply to post by bodrul
 


What I mean is there is no real way to tell the difference between the files in the manner you suggested. There is no listing of the hosts the file has passed through, none of that.



posted on Jun, 27 2008 @ 04:36 PM
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This isn't a law yet though if the Conservative Government considers it a matter of confidence then it will pass because the weak-kneed Liberals nearly faint when they here the word "possible-election". Pussies. It's up to the Bloc and NDP to put up an opposition to this bill though even with those to parties all the liberals have to do is not show up and it will pass..

[edit on 27-6-2008 by sardion2000]



posted on Jun, 27 2008 @ 04:40 PM
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reply to post by sardion2000
 


Yeah, as much as I hate people who cannot/do not vote in my country talking about our political issues... I have to step across the fence for this one. This is heinous, and even more so ignorant. I won't be traveling to Canada any time soon should this pass.



posted on Jun, 27 2008 @ 04:44 PM
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Yep, it doesn't matter if you OWN the original CD or not, the fact that you have music on your MP3 player means YOU'RE A CRIMINAL!

...or so the government says.


There's no feasible way to refute the charges. You would literally have to bring those border guards all the way back to your house and show them your CD collection to challenge the charges.

Obviously, they're not going to do that... so you're guilty until proven innocent... wait, you can't prove yourself innocent... you're automatically guilty.

Thats it. Everyone is guilty.

Thanks US for infecting us with your obsessive copyright laws.



posted on Jun, 27 2008 @ 04:47 PM
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I have read this many times now but I still haven't seen how they plan on determining what is a legal mp3 and what is illegal. The way it is written, it sounds like any MP3 that isn't purchased from iTunes or something similar would be illegal. I just don't see how they expect to enforce this.



posted on Jun, 27 2008 @ 04:50 PM
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reply to post by sardion2000
 


And that's the problem. It's a catch-22. Harper can pretty much do what he wants because an election now would probably end up with a Conservative majority. But, Harpers gov't has been scandal plagued from the beginning. Dion has to take advantage of that and make a stand somewhere...I hope.



posted on Jun, 27 2008 @ 04:52 PM
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Sorry for the double post, but I've come up with a plan of action.

Firstly, inform your government representatives that you intend to bring your iPod full of your 100% legally owned music across the border as many times as you can in the next while.

For every time the border agents charge you for possessing illegal music, sue the government.

You'll make a whole LOAD of cash off the government. Why? Because you can prove you own the music, and are being wrongfully charged for it.


Go call your lawyer, see if they can give you advice on baiting the government into a lawsuit the government can't win.

But don't stop once you've got your lawsuit... KEEP DOING IT!
Prove your point!



posted on Jun, 27 2008 @ 04:53 PM
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Originally posted by Karlhungis
I have read this many times now but I still haven't seen how they plan on determining what is a legal mp3 and what is illegal. The way it is written, it sounds like any MP3 that isn't purchased from iTunes or something similar would be illegal. I just don't see how they expect to enforce this.


They won't have to. It's not a criminal act, it's a civilian penalty meaning the record companies will take you to court and sue you for a maximum of $500 CND per infringment not sure if there is a maximum there either. I would assume it would be something deemed "sane" like 10,000 bucks(ie like college fund which they are planning on raiding... that will be GREAT for the economy
) It seems that now that the majority of Canadians have at one time performed an illigal act as per this new law, it gives the americans just what they want, an nearly unlimited revenue stream through lawsuits.

[edit on 27-6-2008 by sardion2000]




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