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Aussie scientists push transistor barrier (Single Atom Transistors)

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posted on Jun, 25 2008 @ 09:38 PM
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Aussie scientists push transistor barrier (Single Atom Transistors)


www.zdnet.com.au

Australian scientists from the Centre for Quantum Computing Technology, have pushed the boundaries of atomic scale fabrication by building a wire only three atoms thick, opening the possibility of new chip architectures.

...

Simmons' wire was created by placing single phosphorus atoms in a wafer of silicon using a scanning tunnel microscope. Simmons said her research has caught the interest of IBM, who believes her research may hold the potential for new device architectures.

...

Such single atom fabrication is also another step towards building single atom transistors, the first step in creating quantum computers. While no working prototypes exist, quantum computers are theorised to be much faster than today's machines. This has lead to an interest from defence institutions, as quantum computing promises the ability to crack high level encryption in a fraction of the time it takes today.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jun, 25 2008 @ 09:38 PM
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I am really hoping that this is true because current architectures are almost reaching the maximum transistor count for acceptable die sizes.

With these thin transistors, quantum processing is becoming a reality. Sooner or later we can finally keep 1024 bit ransomware at bay =D.

U.S. Department of Defense will definitely take advantage of this first.

www.zdnet.com.au
(visit the link for the full news article)

[edit on 6/25/2008 by die_another_day]



posted on Jun, 25 2008 @ 09:48 PM
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I remember talk of this a while back, in their earlier, more theoretical phase.

Sounds like they're making headway.


The question I have, and I pose this to other science minded individuals...
What about decay?

I mean, it's 3 atoms thick... that's only three atoms that have to decay due to entropy. Which makes it very unreliable... the link could sever within a few years... or within the next very second. There's nothing to determine the life span of a 3 atom bridge.

Wouldn't that mean you would have to have backup parallel electron paths running along side it to ensure reliability? Wouldn't that defeat the purpose?



posted on Jun, 26 2008 @ 08:22 AM
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Originally posted by johnsky
I remember talk of this a while back, in their earlier, more theoretical phase.

Sounds like they're making headway.


The question I have, and I pose this to other science minded individuals...
What about decay?

I mean, it's 3 atoms thick... that's only three atoms that have to decay due to entropy. Which makes it very unreliable... the link could sever within a few years... or within the next very second. There's nothing to determine the life span of a 3 atom bridge.

Wouldn't that mean you would have to have backup parallel electron paths running along side it to ensure reliability? Wouldn't that defeat the purpose?



You mean half-life? Radioactive decay?
Yeh, that is a problem. But we can use substances that decay slow.

Seriously, I'm no where near an expert on this subject, all i found was that phosphorus by itself has a halflife of less than a month.




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