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Why don't astronomers see UFOs?

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posted on Jan, 10 2009 @ 05:23 PM
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Some good points being made in this thread.


It is indeed true that astronomers see UFOs, and they do report them too!
Obviously (as has been said before) they tend not to report many, since most of the time they know what's what, but they do occasionally get stumped.

Of course just because the experts don't know what something is, does not mean it is necessarily anything that out of the ordinary - it is often the case that they are not aware of every single phenomenon.

The sky is a big place, and we still have lots to learn about it!

Tim Printy writes:

Why don't astronomers report UFOs more frequently?

Over the centuries amateur and professional astronomers have chased their share of interesting and unusual astronomical events. Some have proved to be new and exciting. However, many turned out to be explainable and somewhat mundane. It is interesting to note that amateurs will continue to report these events when they do see them and are not likely to hold back in reporting their observations if they feel they are valid. Would amateur astronomers continue this openness if they actually saw an unidentified object passing through the sky during an observing session?

UFOlogy wants the astronomer connection to work in one direction only. If an astronomer reports a UFO, it is accepted at face value as a good report of something new and exotic. When an astronomer observes what others perceive to be a UFO and can offer a prosaic expanation based on their observations they are ridiculed or labeled a "debunker". If an astronomer is out observing when a UFO event occurs and sees nothing, they are ignored. The reason they are ignored is because most UFOlogists are under a serious misconception about astronomers. They explain that astronomers are too busy looking through the narrow field of view in their eyepiece to see these UFO events! For instance Chris Rutowski writes:

...amateur astronomers aren't interested in moving lights in the sky any more than they are in identifiable aircraft. The ones I hang out with want to do some specific imaging of nebulas and galaxies, and spend a lot of time looking through eyepieces with tiny fields of view. Of course, many have now switched to computer-guided scopes and spend their time in warm-up rooms, often miles away from the telescope itself. Professional astronomers are even worse in terms of observation. Few actually DO any optical observations. Many haven't looked through a telescope or spent any time looking at constellations since their undergraduate days. (Rutowski)

Unfortunately, Rutowski is misrepresenting what many amateur astronomers do...

Visit the link for the full text: Astronomers and UFOs

Ian Ridpath also has a very good page explaining how easily mistakes can be made, and how even seemingly trustworthy whitenesses can not be trusted, which also relates to this topic: Astronomical causes of UFOs




posted on Jan, 10 2009 @ 06:18 PM
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I think the youtube channel GRIDKEEPER had something, UFOs?,
pass by in one or two of his Moon videos.

I mean the Moon must be under his constant watch.

Better yet, some strange things in earth orbit might be UFOs
but are orbiting objects so they might be Unknown Orbiting Objects, UOO.



posted on Jan, 11 2009 @ 07:59 AM
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Speaking of astronomy and UFOs, I've read about special computer programs that have been written to scan galaxies with radio telescopes for tell tale signs of planets. I've often wondered if a computer program used to control an array of cameras has ever been written to scan the sky for shapes, movement, etc. similar to that described by UFO witnesses/videos and record them. Then, after all the airplanes, helicopters and other identifiable subjects in the footage have been sifted through, perhaps some interesting video could be obtained this way. Anyone ever heard of anything like this being done?



posted on Jan, 11 2009 @ 10:15 AM
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Originally posted by synchro
I've often wondered if a computer program used to control an array of cameras has ever been written to scan the sky for shapes, movement, etc. similar to that described by UFO witnesses/videos and record them. Then, after all the airplanes, helicopters and other identifiable subjects in the footage have been sifted through, perhaps some interesting video could be obtained this way. Anyone ever heard of anything like this being done?


Yes - there are 'all-sky' camera networks run by both individuals and organizations/educational establishments that use software to identify motion with the aim of recording meteors.

Here's one example: aquarid.physics.uwo.ca...

Another: www.cloudbait.com...

Edit to add a link to the software that is usually used: MetRec

[edit on 11-1-2009 by C.H.U.D.]



posted on Mar, 2 2009 @ 10:01 AM
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I'm no astronomer. I grew up in rural America. My entire family used to lay out on blankets and watch the night sky. I've seen hundreds of shooting stars. I knew most of the constellations by the time I was 10. I've always known where the "dog star" was, and have watched Venus as the morning and evening star. I have a deck that looks west. I watch Venus set almost every night. I sit out on the deck with my dogs and relax.

It's common for hicks like us to watch the skies. I only had 3 channels of TV growing up, and we were only allowed an hour or so of TV per day. I've probably spent more time outdoors than 90% of all Americans. I worked outdoors for decades. I've hiked more miles than I can remember. I've probably camped more than 90% of Americans, and I didn't always camp in parks either. I often do 3 day floats and just sleep on the banks in a pup tent.

I hunt and fish. Hunting often requires one to be in their stand while it's still dark, then just sitting out in creation for hours on end. Fishing is similar. Sitting out on a huge lake all night long, under the stars with a couple buddies. This is my life. I'm an avid outdoorsman. I've never looked through a telescope, but I've spent my life watching Orion move across the nighttime sky.

I've never seen a UFO. I've never talked to a person who's ever seen a UFO. Sure, I've met people who've talked to people who had a family member who was married to a person who saw a UFO. I do not understand how people can talk like UFO's are common. Sightings are the rarest of the rare.

I take it back. I know "Jared." He's seen UFO's. But he's also seen the Mothman and Bigfoot. He's also been arrested a dozen times for public intoxication, DWI and drug possession. I am not lying. That is absolutely the truth.



posted on Mar, 2 2009 @ 10:47 AM
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Another one: UFOCapture.
See "capture samples" for a selection of fantastic footage.



posted on Mar, 2 2009 @ 09:05 PM
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I was fortunate to find this data, & feel very compelled to offer it to all interested.

I am profoundly sorry for those who refuse to believe, especially those who build walls.

Dr. James E. McDonald, was an atmospheric physicist at the University of Arizona. He was involved with the US House Committee on Science & Astronautics, when it held a Symposium on UFOs in WDC, 29 July 1968.

LINK: [Cases] www.ncas.org...

There are several cases listed concerning astronomers, as well as other professionals from other backgrounds.



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