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Man-made tornadoes could power the future

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posted on Jun, 25 2008 @ 06:53 PM
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Man-made tornadoes could power the future


www.msnbc.msn.com

The AVE structure is a 200-meter-wide arena with 100-meter-high walls. Warm humid air enters at the sides, directed to flow in a circular fashion. As the air whirls around at speeds up to 200 mph, a vacuum forms in the center, which holds the vortex together as it extends several miles into the sky.

The concept is similar to a solar chimney with the swirling walls of the vortex replacing the brick walls of the tower. But the AVE can reach much higher into the sky where the air is colder.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jun, 25 2008 @ 06:53 PM
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I think any chance at cheap clean energy should bee looked into fully. This is a new idea. I have not heard about any thing like this before. The inventor says it would be cheaper to operate then any other energy source being used. The two hundred megawatt plant would cost about sixty million, but thus far there are no takers. I hope that will change some time.

www.msnbc.msn.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jun, 25 2008 @ 06:56 PM
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Allow me to add this additional source of the same story to thread:


Friday, June 20, 2008
Artificial tornado plan to generate electricity
Most of us know that tornadoes are unpredictable, uncontrollable, and dangerous. But a Canadian engineer thinks they could be the future of electricity generation. He wants to make electricity from artificial tornadoes.

Louis Michaud, a retired petroleum engineer in Sarnia, Ontario, plans to use the waste heat from conventional power plants to create an "atmospheric vortex engine" - a small, controlled tornado that would drive turbines and generate electricity. "I'm confident that we could control these things," he says. Michaud also thinks solar powered tornados generated using the sun's heat could also work.

His latest design is a circular wall 200 meters across and 100 meters high without a roof. Air carrying the waste heat would be blown in from vents on the sides, spinning around the walls into a vortex that becomes just like a real tornado. Once started, the vortex would draw in more hot air from vents in the wall, pulling it past turbines and generating electricity.

Michaud calculates that a vortex engine of this size would create a tornado about 50 meters in diameter and generate between 50 and 500 MW of electricity.

He first patented the idea in 1975 and has kept working on the idea ever since - the diagram above comes from his most recent patent filed in 2001.

Michaud has made various working models to demonstrate the concept, you can see a video of one of the latest, 4 meters in size shown left and in a video here (.mpg format).

A recent assessment by an independent engineering consultant Clem Bowman and colleagues concluded the idea deserves more research. But for that to happen Michaud needs more funding, he hopes to interest a power plant operator.

Kurt Kleiner, New Scientist contributor



posted on Jun, 25 2008 @ 07:20 PM
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reply to post by schrodingers dog
 


Thanks for the info Schrod
I really do hope more people will take note of this. I would like to see it work.



posted on Jun, 25 2008 @ 07:30 PM
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the diagram above comes from his most recent patent filed in 2001.


Could we possibly get that diagram? It would be helpful to further understanding his design.


All in all, this sounds very feasible. The waste thermal energy from conventional plants could go toward much better use, this would take those exhaust emissions and put them to a more efficient use.

The solar option also shows promise, but that would ultimately depend on the design itself, and how much thermal energy you can obtain from the solar variant.

It's not a replacement for conventional reactors... but it certainly makes them efficient.



posted on Jun, 25 2008 @ 07:37 PM
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Originally posted by johnsky


the diagram above comes from his most recent patent filed in 2001.


Could we possibly get that diagram? It would be helpful to further understanding his design.


All in all, this sounds very feasible. The waste thermal energy from conventional plants could go toward much better use, this would take those exhaust emissions and put them to a more efficient use.

The solar option also shows promise, but that would ultimately depend on the design itself, and how much thermal energy you can obtain from the solar variant.

It's not a replacement for conventional reactors... but it certainly makes them efficient.



Ask and you shall receive!



posted on Jun, 25 2008 @ 07:44 PM
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Oh... I was hoping it would be a little more descriptive, with more than just one cross section.

Oh well. I guess we'll have to wait until they begin production.

Many thanks though schrodinger.

[edit on 25-6-2008 by johnsky]



posted on Jun, 25 2008 @ 07:45 PM
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Seems feasible from the little information there is. I assume there is no way the tornado can 'jump' out of the silo and take off on its own.

Sounds like this a variation of implosion technology. Nice to see it get some mainstream attention.

More info:

pesn.com...


Michaud has proposed to build his vortex engine to a diameter of 1300-feet and to a height of 330-feet (400-meters x 100-meters), even though that height could be increased to over 1000-feet. The angle between the air intakes and the tangent of the hollow tube would cause incoming air to swirl into a vortex as it enters the base of the engine. This is the basis by which Michaud’s vortex engine would operate.

The heat that will drive the engine could be applied upstream of the air intakes, at the center of the hollow tube or on the inner wall of the hollow tube. Insulated water pipes may carry the heat to the appropriate location. That heat would cause the swirling air mass air to accelerate inside the tube and propel it upward to an elevation of several thousand feet. While Michaud has proposed to place conventional axial-flow wind turbines in the air intakes, the vortex engine is a versatile concept that can allow for the installation of other designs of turbines. A circular array of vertical-axis turbines could be installed at the air intakes with the generating equipment being mounted overhead and outside the circumference of the tube.

The fact that the vortex engine generates a tornado inside the hollow tube lends itself to being modified to incorporate some of the vortex concepts that were initiated by Dr. Viktor Schauberger. The hollow tube could enclose a giant bladed or bladeless vertical-axis turbine with its axis placed at the center of the tube. The largest proposal for such a turbine originated in Russia and involved placing blades on carriages that rode on a circular track. It may be possible to use adjustable blades and adapt such a concept to a very large vortex engine.



posted on Jun, 25 2008 @ 07:47 PM
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reply to post by johnsky
 


Oh I'm sorry, let me get on that right away!
Would you like a magazine while you wait!

Let me see what I can find with this new thingie called google.
lol



posted on Jun, 25 2008 @ 07:48 PM
link   

Originally posted by schrodingers dog
Allow me to add this additional source of the same story to thread:


Friday, June 20, 2008
Artificial tornado plan to generate electricity
Most of us know that tornadoes are unpredictable, uncontrollable, and dangerous. But a Canadian engineer thinks they could be the future of electricity generation. He wants to make electricity from artificial tornadoes.

Louis Michaud, a retired petroleum engineer in Sarnia, Ontario, plans to use the waste heat from conventional power plants to create an "atmospheric vortex engine" - a small, controlled tornado that would drive turbines and generate electricity. "I'm confident that we could control these things," he says. Michaud also thinks solar powered tornados generated using the sun's heat could also work.

His latest design is a circular wall 200 meters across and 100 meters high without a roof. Air carrying the waste heat would be blown in from vents on the sides, spinning around the walls into a vortex that becomes just like a real tornado. Once started, the vortex would draw in more hot air from vents in the wall, pulling it past turbines and generating electricity.

Michaud calculates that a vortex engine of this size would create a tornado about 50 meters in diameter and generate between 50 and 500 MW of electricity.

He first patented the idea in 1975 and has kept working on the idea ever since - the diagram above comes from his most recent patent filed in 2001.

Michaud has made various working models to demonstrate the concept, you can see a video of one of the latest, 4 meters in size shown left and in a video here (.mpg format).

A recent assessment by an independent engineering consultant Clem Bowman and colleagues concluded the idea deserves more research. But for that to happen Michaud needs more funding, he hopes to interest a power plant operator.

Kurt Kleiner, New Scientist contributor




Lovely to hear about this, just as the principle of Hydro Electricity, this can be applied likewise, cost of generating the tornado and sustaining it may be the drawback, but lets wish them success




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