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The Influence of music on your mind ?

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posted on Jun, 29 2008 @ 02:13 PM
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reply to post by nine-eyed-eel
 


You are making ALOT of sense right there, i wouldn't mind you to collaborate a bit more on your thoughts a bit more!!!




posted on Jun, 30 2008 @ 05:28 AM
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reply to post by The Soldier Of Darkness
 


Sure you bet.
When I quote Burroughs, there, saying the writer is trying to turn his readers into his characters...I'm through homage oversimplifying my own view a little bit...cause when I write Babar I'm not trying to make everybody into elephants ...What the artist is really trying to do is refine his tool (and when I say "the artistic process" let me just treat it is a black box, here, I am an artist,writer,musician yaddayaddayadda, but I don't mean the same vague thing that most artists do, but a methodology, a process, a certain set of tricks (a la Oblique Strategies, for example) but that's a whole nother pile of discourse) the artistic process, to make it simultaneously more general and more specific (adding attachments to the Swiss Army knife) so that more and more of the stuff you encounter, the universe, is the raw material on which your process works...cause when you're an artist, you're the god of your particular area, and nobody else (not only does their opinion not matter) is even qualified to see what you're doing if they sat and watched you...what you have that they don't is the organizing tool...set up the machine and whatever conversations you overhear, machine makes novel play poem...whatever images like adverts or dead people's photos, they get washed and into the art...if you run a talking machine, you go from selling waffle mix to guru/messiah/revolutionary...from the musician point of view, this is why mistakes are original, why you tape every single moment of output, why you never play the same thing twice, why whatever is happening in the room at the show gets worked into the process and appears as part of the statement in the output
Is this the direction you was asking me of?
Sideways example, you know the guy who draws money? Photorealistic, he'll draw a twenty on a paper placemat and people take it as payment for food. Instead of being a consumer of the world's process in that restaurant area, he is taking his own stylized art response and making it efficacious over a wider area.
Anyways, advise me if your question ran elsewhere.



posted on Jan, 18 2009 @ 05:35 PM
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THIS IS INTERESTING uk.youtube.com...



posted on Jan, 18 2009 @ 08:08 PM
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I listen to a lot of classical music, orchestra and symphony - I particularly appreciate the violin. I like the escapism that I experience. I am able to escape the confines of my personality and reality. The music tends to take me somewhere that I can't go by myself. At the very least...music expands my horizons.

I tend to believe that we are mind, body, and soul. As to what the soul is, I can only speculate. If the soul is energy then it is plausible that musical tones reverberate in it. Perhaps music calibrates the soul or persuades it this way or that.

I am aware that several popular musicians (Madonna, Prince, Timberlake) use a 3121 tempo because humans are attracted to it for some reason. Apparently, we pay big money to hear that sequence. It seems to be some kind of auditory key.


[edit on 18-1-2009 by checkers]



posted on Jan, 18 2009 @ 08:38 PM
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reply to post by checkers
 


okay, you got me. (????)

what on EARTH is a "3121 tempo"?

i did a google search and got squat.

i have a degree in contemporary writing from Berklee College of Music, and i have never.....



posted on Jan, 18 2009 @ 08:44 PM
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reply to post by tgidkp
 


I studied music technology and have never heard of it either - funny considering the 'artists' mentioned are very relevant.



posted on Jan, 18 2009 @ 09:21 PM
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I recognize a common format or pattern in their music. I'm not a music expert though so I can't really explain it technically.

I believe that it may have something to do with this, particulary #4 and #5:
www.newscientist.com...


[edit on 18-1-2009 by checkers]



posted on Jan, 18 2009 @ 09:26 PM
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Personally speaking, I like all kinds of music and tend to choose what I listen too at any given moment based upon my mood. I have also noticed though that I can be channel surfing and come across a song that perhaps I haven't heard in a while and it can alter my mood...



posted on Jan, 18 2009 @ 09:34 PM
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Originally posted by checkers
I am aware that several popular musicians (Madonna, Prince, Timberlake) use a 3121 tempo because humans are attracted to it for some reason. Apparently, we pay big money to hear that sequence. It seems to be some kind of auditory key.


Not me, no offense meant.

I tend to engage in activities that requires intense concentration, endurance, and quick reflexes. Trance music seems to enhance it immensely. But still, not all trance, like for example, I have a thousand trance tracks, only 10 of those would be able to enhance my performance in intense activities.

You could say it's the tempo of music, but I found, it's not. The ones I've found to enhance my reflexes aren't really the fastest.

And about rock music, they aren't really good for enhancing your mind for intense activities as popularly depicted in movies, tv, etc... Though I love rock music, I actually listen to rock to get me to sleep



posted on Jan, 18 2009 @ 09:43 PM
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I found more relevant information here:


Both melodies and the musical scales on which they are based are all about differences in frequency - what musicians call the "intervals" - between the notes. Listen to pairs of randomly chosen frequencies played simultaneously and you'll find that some combinations sound pleasing while others can be unpleasant. What matters as far as our perception is concerned is the ratio of the frequencies: the ones we prefer tend to be simple ratios such as 2:1, 3:2 and so on.


www.newscientist.com...


Our brains learn a kind of musical grammar that is specific to the music of our culture, just as we learn to speak the language of our culture. This becomes the basis for our understanding of music, and ultimately the basis for what we like in music, what music moves us, and how it moves us.


www.newscientist.com...

books.google.com... #PPP1,M1

[edit on 18-1-2009 by checkers]



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