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The (not so) Smart Fortwo Car; and the MPG SHAM!

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posted on Jul, 28 2008 @ 02:42 PM
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reply to post by Corbin Dalus
 

All - I live in Germany and own a 2005 Smart Roadster. While I understand that I only have a 699cc turbocharged engine while the new Fourtwo is 1 liter, I consistently get 55 - 58 Mpg, to the US Gallon, at 60-70 Mph. I do not let the semi-automatic trans shift itself but upshift as soon as the computer lets me. The difference in self shifting and letting the car shift itself is about 10 Mpg. So if the US mileage tests are done strictly letting the car shift, I can understand why they say the mileage isn't great. Still, 55 Mpg isn't bad.




posted on Jul, 28 2008 @ 09:16 PM
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posted on Jul, 28 2008 @ 09:44 PM
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You may want to keep in mind with a car that small, what kind of safety issues the car company has consider to make it street legal.
So there would be alot of reinforcement for saftey issue's, which add's alot more weight. And with a small engine...., there goes the gas mileage.



posted on Sep, 20 2008 @ 12:01 PM
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reply to post by Corbin Dalus
 


I’m not impressed ether, my 2001 Toyota corolla S (Manual 5sp) got 36/42 MPG for the first 4 yrs I owned it. After driving it a week with no oil (try that with most cars) I’m “only” getting 31/36 (170,000 miles so far on it)



posted on Sep, 20 2008 @ 01:16 PM
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I owned a Rabbit diesel and 2 VW pickups. They were amazing and the 1st truck more than paid for itself in fuel savings. The Rabbit would get 54.7 mpg consistently and was pretty quick as well. I am now driving a Honda Fit that gets 33.5 to 38.9 mpg. The Fit is a much more refined car and much faster. I think that if it wasn't as heavy, due to safety regulations, it could possibly do a lot better. The Fits for the U.S. market are much heavier and geared lower than those sold elsewhere. I don't think heavier cars are doing anyone any good. The driving habits of the general public is what needs to be dealt with instead of building cars that allow people to survive crashes that shouldn't even occur.



posted on Sep, 20 2008 @ 01:51 PM
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What you are not taking into account for the Prius or a Jetta TDI, for example, is that not only do they get 40-something mpg, their resales are amazingly high. You can buy a new one and trade in two years less expensively than any other cars on the road (in the U.S.), ASSUMING you are able to make the investment in the first place. Even good used cars can be more expensive, considering the likelihood of very expensive repairs, while new cars are under warranty.

I am in sales, and I drive quite a bit, every working day, and believe me, I know my cost per mile. I have tried lots of options, and the least expensive car I have ever owned was a Prius.



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