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Can the "Average Joe" Speak on the Senate Floor?

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posted on Jun, 21 2008 @ 12:10 AM
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I have been contemplating the what it would be like to get the opportunity to speak to all of our Congress, to tell them just how stupid and babyish they have become, and to share some common sense answers to our problems. (not that I Know it all)

This made me think, would it take a petition? I mean, if I got 100,000 signatures, or 1,000,000, could I then speak on the floor? Could my Congressman be convinced and "sponsor" me?

Is there anyone who knows if this is possible? I mean, imagine doing that, and then spreading it via youtube; crazy, right?




posted on Jun, 21 2008 @ 12:11 AM
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reply to post by jasonjnelson
 


If you do it, make sure you do it in a professional manner and not a rant otherwise they would just laugh you off.

But, that is a great idea though.



posted on Jun, 21 2008 @ 02:22 AM
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reply to post by jhill76
 


Although I would hardly think a rant the best course of action, I do believe that someone needs to slap these morons in the head with logic, as well as inspire a new debate in our society that emphasizes the need for the common man to be heard. My Ideas are not new, nor am I the best person fort this job. However, if one was to want to, what would it take? What would they say? Since I hate open ended threads, hewre is what I would say,keeping in mind that I am Joe Nobody.

I for one have written a series of essays that are titled, (for lack of anything exciting)

"Things to change and make America stronger"

These things were, in no order of importance:

1)Prison Reform- Encompassing the investigative, judicial, rehabilitation and punishment issues that plague our current system. These changes would help to better address the crimes, and those that commit them, as well as providing a climate that encourages the actual development of those individuals who are now doomed to a criminal cycle. These changes also address the issue of funding, becoming a system that is self reliant and uses minimal budget funds.

2)Education reform- Uniforms, mandatory physical education and health & diet classes. Civics, ethics, and Government activism classes as a mandatory as well. School year round, (look at retention levels for lessons with these long breaks. You can't say you want to keep up with the world when we are the only ones doing this) with teachers working 2 years, and getting one half year off, and one half year paid schooling to stay current in their topics.

3)Mandatory service to the country- 2 years of military, or peace corp, or whatever. In return they are given a paid schooling, as well as some wage while working. Obviously, military and longer commitments would get much better benefits, but everyone would have to do something. (even disabled people can fill any job they can do, depending on the disability) We would send out farmers kids to third world countries, to train people in better farming. You could even let anyone who goes to college straight out of high school work after they graduate. Imagine sending thousands of teachers aides to inner city schools, and medical students to areas that need their help all over the world.

These are just some, and I have a much more in depth look at all of these, as there are ten total. My favorite is prison reform, as I have some rally good ideas. But I am no expert, and it might not be the ideas, as much as telling our leaders that they really, really, suck right now.



posted on Jun, 21 2008 @ 02:51 AM
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reply to post by jasonjnelson
 


I think...although I am not sure, that you must be invited by resolution or through a ranking committee in order to speak before the Congress or Senate. Either that, or the Speaker/party leader can get you in - but if you were to get in, no one really has to attend. They usually do though...but thats because the only people they end up inviting are heads of state and the like.

I'm pretty sure you can't because it would quickly turn into a political circus with as many people who would try to get in there and speak. Also, since some of the things you listed - like education reform and large portions of the prison system - are almost always the decision of individual states and the federal government has no or very little control, they wouldn't be likely to take you seriously.

[edit on 21-6-2008 by ALightinDarkness]



posted on Jun, 21 2008 @ 02:56 AM
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reply to post by ALightinDarkness
 


Yeah, maybe. Although, the issues I spoke of ARE under federal control, or have federal money tied into them. Besides, mine was merely an idea, but I was talking about anyone in general.

Do you rally think that congress would ignore a petition signed by 10,000,000 million registered voters?



posted on Jun, 21 2008 @ 03:03 AM
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reply to post by jasonjnelson
 


10 million signatures? Probably not, but it would take a while and I'm sure they'd make you pay to get the signatures verified. It would be a red tape nightmare.

I just recently contributed some research to a peer reviewed article about prison sitings, so I know that there is a huge portion of the prison system under state control. Your talk would only impact federal prisons.

I do have a graduate degree in public administration, and from what I can remember none of the education things you listed are under the discretion of the Department of Education. County or city school boards decide uniforms, state level education departments decide the rest, and both state and county/city school boards can make decisions on year round or traditional school year. It would be up to individual schools to decide on faculty pay.

You could of course attempt to tie requirements into federal funds, but the court cases would be slapped on so quick and so fast you wouldn't get anywhere. There is a very strong precedent set for giving state/local school boards autonomy, even with federal money being tied to it. At most, the DoE could issue non-binding guidelines and recommendations for some of these items.

[edit on 21-6-2008 by ALightinDarkness]



posted on Jun, 21 2008 @ 03:07 AM
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reply to post by ALightinDarkness
 


Hey, I appreciate your points and all, but those ten points are not, "What the federal Government could do to make America better".

I was giving an example of something I might say. Truth is, I would talk about energy reform, or a Billion dollar "X" prize (for energy), or Border issues, etc.

I am trying to talk about something else mate.

(MOF, only 6 of my ten points are controlled by the federal government. the point of that essay is policy for the whole country, not who institutes it)

[edit on 21-6-2008 by jasonjnelson]



posted on Jun, 21 2008 @ 03:10 AM
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I think my point was simply that talking about things that are almost exclusively left up to the state or local governments would not give you credibility with that crowd, since they have little control over it and in most cases don't want the political headache of trying to control it. Its like talking to the city council about foreign policy - not only are they not likely to care, they can't/won't ever be able to do anything about it.

More power to you if you were to try this though - although again, it would have to be very unique circumstances I think because anything else would set a precedent for a never ending political circus and political grand standing by citizens.

[edit on 21-6-2008 by ALightinDarkness]



posted on Jun, 21 2008 @ 08:28 AM
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*cough*
bump
*cough*



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